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Singer Selena Gomez to Launch Mental Health Platform

A new mental health media platform meant to connect people with educational resources and reduce the stigma around mental illness is planned by pop star Selena Gomez and her partners.

Wondermind is set to launch in February 2022 and will include mental health experts sharing their expertise, and daily exercises that people can do to strengthen their mental health, CNN reported.

No Evidence Violent Video Games Lead to Real Violence: Study

Will boys fixated on gore-filled video games become violent in real life? Many parents may worry that's the case, but new and reassuring research finds violent video games don't trigger actual violence in kids.

The study included boys aged 8 to 18, the group most likely to play violent video games, and examined two types of violence: aggression against other people, and destruction of thi...

Death Threats, Trolling Common for Scientists Who Speak to Media About COVID

Doctors who discuss COVID-19 in the media frequently face abuse and harassment, including threats of death or violence, a new report reveals.

More than two-thirds of experts surveyed have experienced trolling or personal attacks after speaking about COVID-19 in media interviews, a worldwide survey of more than 300 scientists found.

Further, a quarter said such harassment is a freque...

As Kids Turned to Screens During Pandemic, Their Mental Health Suffered

Even in normal times, getting regular exercise and spending less time on screens can be good for kids. So it should come as no surprise that researchers discovered that kids who exercised more and used technology less during the pandemic had better mental health outcomes.

"Both as a pediatrician and as a mother, it was obvious that the circumstances of the pandemic -- school closures, res...

Facebook Became Emergency Network During Early Days of Pandemic

In a health emergency, social media giants like Facebook can be both quagmires of misinformation and sources of social support and reliable guidance, a small, new study suggests.

Researchers surveyed 32 Facebook users weekly for eight weeks. All were asked about their online experiences during March and April 2020, when COVID-triggered lockdowns unfolded.

The Facebook users -- ...

Too Much Screen Time Could Raise Your Odds for Stroke

You've heard the warnings about kids who are forever glued to their screens, but all that screen time can have devastating health effects for grown-ups.

If you're under 60, too much time using a computer, watching TV or reading could boost your risk for a stroke, Canadian researchers warn.

"Be aware that very high sedentary time with little time spent on physical activity can have a...

Online & Outraged? Facebook 'Likes' Stoke the Fire

Rewards such as "likes" and "shares" fuel expressions of moral outrage on social media because they reward people who post such messages, a new study suggests.

"Social media's incentives are changing the tone of our political conversations online," said first author William Brady, a postdoctoral researcher in psychology at Yale University in New Haven, Conn. "This is the first evidence th...

Use Facebook a Lot? You're More Likely to Be Unvaccinated

Americans who get their COVID-19 news and information solely from Facebook have much lower vaccination rates than the general population.

That's the takeaway from a new survey of nearly 20,700 people across the United States. The researchers asked them in June which of six sources they use for COVID-19 news and info. The six included: Facebook, CNN, Fox News, MSNBC, the Biden administrati...

How Trust in Science Can Make You Vulnerable to 'Pseudoscience'

Trusting science is good, but it could put you at risk for being duped by false science, or "pseudoscience," if you let your guard down, researchers warn.

Investigators found that people who trust science are more likely to believe and share false claims that contain scientific references than those who don't trust science.

"We conclude that trust in science, although desirable in m...

Addictive, Harmful Vaping Is Super Cool on TikTok

Watch videos on TikTok and you're likely to see plenty of positive portrayals of vaping, a new study shows.

And that's a problem, according to researchers, who call for tighter regulation of the platform popular with kids and teens.

"Viewing other young people, friends, acquaintances or influencers vaping in fun and entertaining contexts, is likely to normalize e-cigarette use and m...

1 in 20 College Students Has 'Internet Gaming Disorder,' Study Finds

Is it possible to become addicted to gaming on the internet?

Yes, warns new research that discovered when young people get too hooked it may trigger sleep difficulties, depression, anxiety and, in some cases, even suicidal thoughts.

Phone interviews conducted among nearly 3,000 American college students between 2007 and 2015 revealed that roughly one in 20 had "internet gaming disor...

Juul to Pay $40 Million in N.C. Case Over Vaping's Harm to Teens

Juul, the leading e-cigarette maker in the United States, has agreed to pay $40 million to settle a lawsuit by North Carolina that alleged the company intentionally got scores of teenagers hooked on nicotine.

North Carolina Attorney General Josh Stein, who sued the company two years ago, announced the settlement on Monday.

The company did not admit to any liab...

Fast-Food Companies Spending More on Ads Aimed at Youth

The U.S. fast-food industry has boosted spending on ads targeting kids, especially Black and Hispanic youth, new research shows.

For the study, the researchers analyzed data on ad spending and TV ad exposure for 274 fast-food restaurants and found that annual spending hit $5 billion in 2019, up more than $400 million between 2012 and 2019.

"Fast-food consumption by children and teen...

Most Editors at Leading Medical Journals Are White, Study Finds

The vast majority of editors at leading medical journals are white - with few of those influential spots going to Black or Hispanic professionals, a new study finds.

The study comes on the heels of a controversy that prompted the resignation of the editor-in-chief of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

It all started in February when Dr. Ed Livingston, a JA...

Your Teen's Smartphone Could Be Key to Unhealthy Weight

Your teens' route to a healthy or unhealthy weight may be in their hands -- literally.

New research out of South Korea shows that teens who spend too much time on their smartphones are also more prone to eating habits that increase their odds for obesity.

One nutritionist who helps treat obesity in the young wasn't surprised by the findings.

"Spending hours on end on your phon...

Tennis Star Naomi Osaka's 'Time Out' Highlights Common, Crippling Mental Health Issue

On Tuesday, tennis star Naomi Osaka announced her withdrawal from the French Open. The reason: An ongoing battle with depression and anxiety.

As the world's No. 2 woman's tennis player and a four-time Grand Slam tournament winner at the age of just 23, many fans may have been taken aback that someone so young and successful might nonetheless battle with mental health issues.

Bu...

Think You Can Spot Fake News? Many Can't

Most Americans mistakenly believe they can spot fake news, which makes them more vulnerable to the false information, a new study claims.

The research included nearly 8,300 people who were asked to evaluate the accuracy of a series of Facebook headlines and then rate their own abilities to identify false news.

About 90% of participants said they had an above average ability to tel...

Science Studies Most Likely to Be Wrong Are the Most Widely Read

Studies that can't be verified and may be untrue are much more likely to be cited in the media because they tend to be more interesting, researchers report.

They looked at studies in top psychology, economic and nature/science journals and found that only 39% of 100 psychology papers were successfully replicated. The replication rates were 61% for 18 economic studies, and 62% amo...

Too Much TV May Dull the Aging Brain

Mom always said too much TV would rot your brain, and as with so many other things it appears she was right.

Middle-aged folks who regularly turn to TV for entertainment appear to have a greater risk of decline in their reasoning and memory later in life, three new studies suggest.

Researchers found that even moderate amounts of TV viewing were associated with worse performance on c...

Can Some Movies Change Your Life? Maybe, Study Finds

FRIDAY, May 14, 2021 (HealthDay News) - A good movie can be more than mere entertainment: It can also help you feel more prepared to tackle life's challenges and be a better person, a new study suggests.

This may be why folks sometimes choose films with difficult subjects or those that make them sad, researchers say.

"Meaningful movies actually help people cope with difficulties in ...

Media, TV Time Doubled for Kindergartners During Pandemic

When the COVID-19 pandemic kept young kids indoors, their time spent watching TV and other screens rose dramatically.

That's the finding of a new study that investigated the screen time of kindergarteners from low-income families in Ohio. The researchers found that their use of television, video, movies, short clips, and apps or games on any electronic device topped six hours a day in May...

Debunking Social Media Myth, Study Finds COVID Vaccine Won't Harm Placenta

Contrary to misleading reports spread on social media, a new study finds the COVID-19 vaccine does no damage to the placenta in pregnancy.

In a study of placentas from patients who were vaccinated for COVID-19 during pregnancy, researchers found no evidence of any harm.

"The placenta is like the black box in an airplane. If something goes wrong with a pregnancy, we usually see chan...

Feeling Down? Support Via Social Media May Not Be Enough

Looking for a morale boost or some solid encouragement? If so, socializing the old-fashioned way -- live and in-person -- will likely do more to lift your spirits than online interactions, new research suggests.

It's the key takeaway from a survey of more than 400 college undergraduate students.

"We wanted to see if the social support provided over social media was associated with b...

High-Profile Police Brutality Cases Harm Black Americans' Mental Health: Study

As America awaits a verdict in the Derek Chauvin trial, new research finds that such high-profile police killings of Black people may take a big mental health toll on psyches across the country.

Researchers found that, on average, Black Americans reported an increase in "poor mental health days" during weeks where more than one deadly racial incident was in the news.

Those incidents...

4 in 10 Adults Over 50 Consult Online Reviews When Picking a Doctor

Finding a new doctor can be a daunting task. For help, many older adults turn to online reviews, a new study finds.

In fact, many people rate online reviews as highly as they would a recommendation from friends and family when picking a doctor, the new research found.

"Doctors and policymakers should know that many older adults are viewing and valuing online ratings and reviews when...

Making E-Cigs Cool: Singers, Models in Music Videos Get Teens Vaping

DJ Khaled, Halsey and other musicians are selling electronic cigarettes to young people through product placement in music videos that receive hundreds of millions of views, a pair of new studies report.

Overall, music videos identified as featuring e-cigarette product placements during a four-month period in 2018 received more than 1.6 billion total views on YouTube, researchers report i...

Boys Who Spend Lots of Time Online More Likely to Cyberbully

Here's yet another reason to keep your teenager from spending countless hours online and on popular social media: New research suggests it increases cyberbullying, particularly among teen boys.

"There are some people who engage in cyberbullying online because of the anonymity and the fact that there's no retaliation," said lead investigator Amanda Giordano. She is an associate professor...

More Guns on TV, More Gun Violence in Real Life: Study

When the proportion of gun violence on TV increases relative to other types of violence on television dramas, real-life gun violence among young people also grows, a new study suggests.

Researchers examined trends in the proportion of gun violence compared to other forms of violence in 33 popular TV dramas from 2000 to 2018. They compared this to trends in real-life firearm homicides in d...

When Facebook, Twitter Flag Posts as 'Unverified,' Readers Listen

Readers pay attention when social media sites label an article as "unverified" or "suspicious," a new study suggests.

But how an article is presented -- including author credentials and writing style -- doesn't affect readers' views about its credibility.

The findings show that big tech companies such as Facebook and Twitter have a responsibility to combat the spread of misleading a...

Social Media, Binge Eating Often Go Together for Kids

Could endless hours spent scrolling through social media and watching TV trigger binge eating in preteens?

Apparently so, new research suggests.

"Children may be more prone to overeating while distracted in front of screens. They may also be exposed to more food advertisements on television," said study author Dr. Jason Nagata. He is an assistant professor of pediatrics at the Unive...

Facebook Posts Big Drivers in Vaccine Resistance, Study Finds

As Americans await their COVID-19 shot, a new study of a different vaccine shows the power of Facebook posts in fueling "anti-vax" resistance to immunization.

The study included more than 10 years of public Facebook posts on the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine. It found that nearly 40% of 6,500 HPV vaccine-related posts from 2006 to 2016 amplified a perceived risk. The data suggest the...

1 in 4 Doctors Harassed Online, Study Finds

One in four doctors has been personally attacked or sexually harassed on social media, a new study finds.

Women are more likely to be sexually harassed, while both men and women are attacked based on religion, race or medical recommendations, researchers say.

Doctors received negative reviews, coordinated harassment, threats at work, public exposure of their personal information and...

As Social Media Use Rises, So Does Belief in COVID Misinformation

You can't believe everything you read on social media, but those who rely on it for their news tend to think otherwise.

A new study found that the more a person turned to social media as their main source of news, the more likely that person was to believe misinformation about the COVID-19 pandemic. Levels of worry about the coronavirus amplified people's belief in that misinformation.

Why COVID Lies on Social Media Are So Seductive

Nearly all cases of COVID-19 are completely harmless. Masks deprive people of oxygen. COVID-19 is a hoax, dreamed up by politicians to control your life.

None of these statements is true, and yet every one has spread like wildfire through social media at one point or another this year.

That's because such misinformation exploits specific vulnerabilities in people's ability to think ...

Junk Food, Booze Often Star in America's Hit Movies

If there was an Oscar for "most unhealthy food in a leading role," many of America's most popular movies would be serious contenders.

That's the conclusion of a new review of food content featured in 250 top-grossing U.S. movies. More often than not, the fictional food choices were so bad they wouldn't make the cut of real-world dietary recommendations, the study authors said.

"The ...

Pandemic Precautions: The TV News You Watch Might Matter

Masks or no masks? Social distancing or not?

New research suggests that the media Americans consume matters when these decisions are made. The study found that folks drawn to conservative-leaning TV news were much less likely to follow COVID prevention guidelines.

Researchers analyzed data from more than 4,800 U.S. adults who took part in a nationwide online survey between ...

Losing Some TV Ads Might Reduce Childhood Obesity

Limiting TV ads for sugary, salty and high-fat foods and drinks might help reduce childhood obesity, British researchers suggest.

They looked at advertising of these products between 5:30 a.m. and 9 p.m. If all such ads were withdrawn during those hours, the number of obese kids in the U.K. between the ages of 5 and 17 would drop by 5% and the number of overweight kids would fall...

Another COVID Hazard: False Information

Be careful that the COVID-19 information you're getting is accurate and not opinion masquerading as the real McCoy, says the American College of Emergency Physicians.

Watch out for bold claims and instant cures touted on social media or by friends. Get health and medical information from experts like the ACEP and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the physicians' gr...

Many Americans Pause Social Media as National Tensions Rise

The coronavirus pandemic and the Black Lives Matter movement have prompted some Americans to take a break from social media, new research finds.

The national survey by Ohio State Wexner Medical Center of 2,000 people found that 56% changed their social media habits because of tensions brought on by current U.S. events.

While 29% said their social media use increase...

'Trigger Warnings' May Do More Harm Than Good, Study Finds

Trigger warnings are meant to alert trauma survivors about unsettling text or content that they might find potentially distressing.

But these words of caution at the start of films or books may provide no help at all -- and might even hamper a traumatized person's ability to grapple with deep psychological scars, a new study reports.

"We found that trigger warnings did not ...

Did the Movie 'Joker' Reinforce Prejudice Against Mentally Ill?

The movie "Joker" won multiple awards and broke a box office record, but a new study is questioning whether it also fueled prejudices against people with mental illnesses.

Researchers found that shortly after viewing "Joker," moviegoers showed an uptick in negative feelings toward the mentally ill. In contrast, there was no such change among people who saw a film that was similarly vi...

Screen Time for Tiniest Tots Linked to Autism-Like Symptoms

Letting a baby watch a smartphone, tablet or TV at 12 months increases the odds the child will develop autism-like symptoms during the next year, new research suggests.

On the other hand, if parents spent active play time with their child every day, the odds of autism-like symptoms decreased.

"At 12 months, watching TV or DVDs was associated with more autism symptoms a...

Your Media Use & Coronavirus Precautions Are Probably Linked, Survey Shows

Americans who are young, liberal and heavy consumers of news are most likely to follow COVID-19 safety recommendations, a new online survey reveals.

Three-quarters of the 1,000 U.S. respondents said they followed a majority of recommended social distancing behaviors such as keeping 6 feet apart and limiting trips to stores, the University of Delaware researchers said.

Slight...

Beware of 'Media Overload' During Coronavirus Crisis, Experts Say

If you feel like the news about coronavirus is growing worse by the hour, then it might be time to take stock: How much do you really need to know?

As the pandemic unfolds, and people routinely wake up to uncertainty, it is necessary to stay informed, psychologists say.

At the same time, they caution, remember that media overload is real. And it may raise anxiety to a level...

An Expert's Guide to Fact-Checking Coronavirus Info Online

With bogus information about the new coronavirus spreading fast online, how can you separate fact from fiction?

A communications expert at Virginia Tech in Blacksburg said identifying reliable and useful sources of information is key. Here's her advice:

"Be skeptical of social media posts about the COVID-19 virus, even those that have the superficial look of news items, and...

Too Much 'Screen Time' Could Slow Your Toddler's Language Skills: Study

Everyone is glued to some sort of media these days, but for young kids, that screen time could delay or limit their language skills, a new research review suggests.

"Our findings are really consistent with the guidelines from the American Academy of Pediatrics [AAP], and the bottom line is that kids should use screens in moderation and parents should try to prioritize using screens t...

Celebrity Suicides Spawn 'Copycat' Tragedies, Study Shows

When the media report on a celebrity's suicide, especially in a sensationalist way, it may fuel "copycat" tragedies, a new review finds.

In an analysis of 20 studies from more than a dozen countries, researchers confirmed a phenomenon sometimes called "suicide contagion." It happens when vulnerable people identify with a person who died by suicide, and then see that route as a viable ...

Hit by Coronavirus Panic? Look for Data Not Drama, Experts Say

MONDAY, March 16, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Are you scared and confused over the threat of coronavirus? You're not alone: Every day, every hour, new media reports can have you worrying about worst-case scenarios.

Experts say panic is a natural -- if unhelpful -- response to major crises like COVID-19. But there are ways to stay both informed and calm.

It's not alway...

As Health Worsens, Facebook Posts Often Change

Could clues to future health emergencies be found in Facebook posts?

Maybe so, according to a new study that discovered there are changes in users' posts before they seek emergency care.

For the study, researchers analyzed the Facebook posts and medical records of more than 2,900 patients at a U.S. urban hospital, including 419 who'd had a recent emergency department visit f...

Skipping Sleep to Watch Sports Is the Real March Madness

No matter whether your favorite team wins or loses, March Madness will likely put a slam dunk on your sleep habits.

For many Americans, staying up late to watch NCAA basketball tournament games is a much-anticipated annual rite. But the American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) warns that those late-night games can cause problems.

"A lack of sleep can lead to trouble making ...