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28 Jun

1 in 4 Parents Worry Their Child Isn't Reaching Milestones

While the majority of parents worried about their child's development seek advice from healthcare providers, many still turn to the internet or family and friends, researchers say.

Health News Results - 340

Sex of Fetus May Matter When COVID Strikes in Pregnancy

When a pregnant woman is infected with COVID-19, the sex of the fetus may influence immune system activity, researchers say.

The new study included 68 mothers-to-be. Thirty-eight developed COVID-19 during their third trimester, while 30 remained virus-free. In both groups, half of the fetuses were male and half were female.

In the infected women, male placentas had significantly hig...

Most Kids Newly Diagnosed With ADHD Aren't Getting Best Care

Preschoolers with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) rarely receive the gold-standard treatment recommended by the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) for their condition, a new study reports.

The AAP recommends a behavioral therapy technique called "parent training in behavior management," or PTBM, as first-line treatment for ADHD kids ages 4 and 5.

But only 1 of eve...

State Spending on Poverty Really Pays Off for Kids: Study

When states spend money on programs that reduce poverty, fewer children are abused and neglected, fewer end up in foster care and fewer die, a new study reveals.

Researchers found that for every additional $1,000 that states spent on federal, state and local benefit programs per person living in poverty, there was a 4% reduction in substantiated child abuse, a 2% reduction in foster care ...

Pregnancy, Delivery Safe for Women Born With Heart Defects

Women who were born with heart defects may get some reassurance from a new study that finds they face no heightened risk to health during a pregnancy and delivery.

According to the researchers, doctors may often advise these women against getting pregnant due to the potential risks for them and their babies, but until now those risks have been unclear.

"The most important finding fr...

Abuse in Childhood May Shorten Adult Lives: Study

Child abuse and neglect can do significant and long-lasting damage, according to a six-decade review of British data.

The analysis of records dating to the late 1950s found that children who experienced physical or sexual abuse were more likely to die early as adults.

"Our work shows the long-lasting consequences that specific types of child abuse and neglect can have. The findings ...

'Income Inequality' Could Be Dragging Down Math Skills in U.S. Kids

The United States has the highest income gap in the developed world, and it's affecting how kids do in school, new research suggests.

A new study reports that 10-year-olds' scores on standardized math tests were lower on average between 1992 and 2019 in states with higher levels of income inequality — a measure of how unevenly income is distributed through a population.

And the s...

A Simple Way to Boost Kids' Reading Skills?

A small fix might make reading a bit easier for kids with dyslexia, as well as their classmates: Increasing the amount of space between printed letters.

That's the finding of a small study that tested the effects of "extra-large" letter spacing on school children's reading speed and accur...

Active Learning Best for Students: Study

Whether you're a kid or a college student, you'll learn more with interactive activities, discussions, movement and even AI-enhanced technologies than you will just sitting still and listening, a new study suggests.

Learning methods that work best are hands-on, as well as what the researchers called "minds-on" and "hearts-on," using emotional and social support, the findings showed.

...

Epidurals Not Linked to Autism in Children

Pregnant women who receive an epidural to ease their pain during labor aren't any more likely than others to have kids with autism, two new studies show.

Earlier research suggested this practice may increase autism risk in offspring, but the pair of studies should put this concern to rest for good, experts say.

"Parents can be reassured that there is no link between using epidurals ...

Pot Use by Pregnant Women Rose During Pandemic: Study

Marijuana use by mothers-to-be may have increased by as much as one-quarter during the pandemic, a new study suggests.

Researchers found a substantial increase in the number of women in Northern California using pot early in their pregnancies after the pandemic emerged compared to the previous year.

"Our previous research has shown that the prevalence and frequency of prenatal canna...

Babies Know Best When It Comes to Play

Spend time with babies and you'll see they pick up items, bang them together and, often, chew on them.

That play is key to learning and development, but most research on infant play has taken place in a lab and not on a living room floor — until now.

"At a time in development when infants must acquire information about what objects are and what they can do with them, massive amoun...

Low-Dose Aspirin Guards Against Preeclampsia: Task Force

Pregnant women at risk for a serious high blood pressure disorder called preeclampsia should take low-dose aspirin after their first trimester, according to the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF).

The recommendation, announced Sept. 28, updates and is consistent with the task force's 2014 sta...

Tough Choices: Chemo That Can Save Kids With Cancer Can Also Damage Hearing

The cancer drug cisplatin can save children's lives, but often with the side effect of hearing loss. Now a new study shows that young children are especially vulnerable, and the hearing damage may begin early in the course of treatment.

The researchers said the findings highlight the need to screen kids' hearing during each round of cisplatin treatment, to catch problems early.

Fruits, Veggies a Recipe for Mental Well-Being in Kids

Teens who eat lots of fruits and vegetables are likely to enjoy better mental health.

That's the key takeaway from a new study that also tied a nutritious breakfast and lunch to emotional well-being in kids of all ages.

"This study provides the first insights into how fruit and vegetable intake affects children's mental health and contributes to the emerging evidence around 'food an...

Weight Loss Surgery a Good Option for Severely Obese Kids: Study

Severely obese children who are unable to slim down should be eligible for weight loss surgery, a new study suggests.

The gastric sleeve procedure is safe and effective long-term, said a research team that followed participants as young as 5 for a decade.

"Lack of long-term data and some pediatricians' fears that bariatric [weight loss] surgery might affect children's linear g...

Over Half of American Children Have Detectable Lead Levels in Their Blood

More than 50% of American children have detectable blood lead levels, a new study reveals. And young children who live in places with lots of pre-1950s housing and low incomes have the greatest risk.

"Public health authorities have worked commendably to reduce lead exposure for decades, and yet, substantial risk remains," said study co-author Dr. Harvey Kaufman, head of health trends rese...

For Boys, Sports Key to Mental Health

Trying to fit soccer or Little League into your son's busy schedule? Canadian researchers offer some compelling reasons to do so.

Little boys who play sports are less apt to be anxious or depressed later in childhood and more likely to be active in their early teens, according to the University of Montreal study.

"We wanted to clarify the long-term and reciprocal relationship in sch...

Obesity a Threat to Adults With Autism, But There May Be Help

Eating well and exercising regularly can be a challenge for anyone. But for those with autism spectrum disorder or intellectual disabilities, that challenge is exponentially greater.

Many young men and women with autism and intellectual disabilities face a significantly higher risk for obesity, and all the health complications that follow.

Yet, a small, new pilot study suggest...

Weight Loss in Childhood May Protect Boys Against Future Infertility

Obese boys who lose weight may avoid fertility problems in adulthood, a preliminary study suggests.

Even short-term weight loss might partially reverse weight-related alterations in reproductive function, the researchers said.

Childhood obesity can have serious effects on adulthood health, including a risk of cancer, heart disease and type 2 diabetes. Obesity has also been linked t...

New Tricks to Turn Your Fussy Eater Around

If your children are picky eaters, bribing or pressuring them will probably backfire.

But there are other steps you can take to help them get over their fussiness, researchers report.

Australian scientists reviewed 80 studies to find out more about fussy eaters.

They found that pressuring a child to eat, offering rewards for eating and stricter parenting methods didn't help....

Diabetes Drug Might Help Women With Preeclampsia Prolong Their Pregnancy

Metformin, a commonly prescribed diabetes drug, may help stave off preterm birth among women who develop pregnancy-related high blood pressure.

Preeclampsia is marked by a sudden spike in blood pressure, protein in urine, or other problems during pregnancy. Preterm preeclampsia occurs between 26 and 32 weeks of pregnancy and often leads to early delivery, putting babies at risk. Preemies ...

Childhood Trauma Linked With Higher Odds for Adult Neurological Ills

Kids who suffer abuse, neglect or household dysfunction are more likely to have neurological problems like stroke or headaches as adults, researchers report.

"Traumatic events in childhood have been linked in previous studies to a higher risk of heart disease, diabetes, riskier health behaviors like smoking and drug use, and decreased life expectancy," said researcher Dr. Adys Mendizabal...

Witnessing Abuse of a Sibling Can Traumatize a Child

Seeing a parent abuse a sibling can be as traumatizing as watching a parent hurt another parent, a new study finds.

And it can lead to depression, anxiety and anger, researchers say.

"When we hear about exposure to family violence, we usually think about someone being the victim of direct physical abuse or witnessing spousal assault," said researcher Corinna Tucker. She is a profes...

Intervening in Infancy Might Help Prevent Some Cases of Autism: Study

Infants may show early signs of autism, but a diagnosis usually isn't made until age 3. Now, a new study suggests that jumpstarting therapy might stave off that diagnosis altogether.

Researchers say their preemptive, parent-led intervention could have a significant impact on children's social development and longer-term disabilities.

"What we found is that the babies who received ou...

Neighborhood Gun Violence Means Worse Mental Health for Kids

Living within a few blocks of a shooting increases the risk that a child will end up visiting the emergency department for mental health-related problems, researchers say.

The new study found significant increases in mental health-related ER visits in the two weeks after a neighborhood shooting, especially among kids who lived closest to it and those exposed to multiple shootings.

"...

Child Obesity Rose Sharply During Pandemic

Childhood obesity was a worrisome issue before the pandemic, and now it's alarmingly worse, new data shows.

A U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention study found a "profound increase in weight gain for kids" that is "substantial and alarming," Dr. Alyson Goodman, one of the study's authors, told the Associated Press.

For the study, researchers reviewed the medical r...

Why Are More U.S. Babies Being Born With Syphilis?

The number of U.S. infants born with syphilis is climbing at an alarming pace, reaching a high not seen since the 1990s, according to new government figures.

Newborn syphilis, a potentially fatal condition, was at one time nearly eliminated in the United States. But the disease has seen a resurgence in recent years — and 2020 was no exception, say researchers with the U.S. Centers for D...

Child Cancers Are Rare, But Here Are Signs to Look For

Most parents want their children to live carefree lives, so a diagnosis of childhood cancer is devastating. Fortunately, pediatric cancers are rare.

Yet it doesn't hurt to be watchful for the warning signs, suggest experts in childhood cancer from Penn State Health.

The best screening most parents can do is to stay on track with well-child visits, the doctors said.

"For e...

Getting Kids Eyeglasses Boosts School Grades: Study

New glasses are helping kids in Baltimore see more success in school.

A three-year clinical study found that students who got new eyeglasses through a school-based program had higher reading and math test scores.

"The glasses offered the biggest benefit to the very kids who needed it the most -- the ones who were really struggling in school," said Dr. Megan Collins, a pediatric opht...

Kids Who Grew Up With Smokers Have Higher Odds for Rheumatoid Arthritis

While breathing in secondhand smoke is known to harm kids' lungs, new research suggests that children whose parents smoked are also more prone to developing rheumatoid arthritis later in life.

"Our findings give more depth and gravity to the negative health consequences of smoking in relation to [rheumatoid arthritis], one of the most common autoimmune diseases," said lead author Dr. Kazu...

Only 1 in 10 Kids With ADHD Will Outgrow It

Struggling with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) as a child is heart-breaking enough, but now new research confirms what many have long suspected: These patients will often continue to be plagued by ADHD symptoms as adults.

Only about one in 10 kids with the disorder are likely to have a full and lasting remission of their symptoms, according to new data gleaned from tracki...

Diabetes in Pregnancy Tied to Eye Issues in Kids

Children whose mothers had diabetes during pregnancy are at increased risk for severe forms of common eye problems such as far- and near-sightedness and astigmatism, a long-term study suggests.

Collectively, they're known as refractive errors, conditions in which the eye is unable to properly focus images on the retina.

"As many [refractive errors] in young children are treatable, e...

Your Metabolism Changes As You Age, Just Not When You Think

Everyone knows that your metabolism peaks in your teenage years, when you're fit and active and feeling your oats.

And everyone knows that a person's metabolism slows down in middle age, as bodies start to expand and sag, and become less energetic.

But that's all wrong, it now appears -- fake news about how humans age that's gained the currency of truth over the years.

Your me...

'Preemie' Babies More Vulnerable to Autism Diagnosis Later: Study

Babies born prematurely, even just a couple weeks early, may be at increased risk of autism, a large new study suggests.

It's long been known that autism, a developmental brain disorder, is more common among children who were born preterm -- before the 37th week of pregnancy.

Researchers said the new study, of more than 4 million people, gives a clearer breakdown of the risks associ...

Pandemic Has Depression, Anxiety Rates Among Youth Climbing Worldwide

If you think the pandemic hasn't taken a toll on the mental health of young people, ponder these two facts from a new review: one in four are suffering from depression, while one in five are struggling with anxiety.

"Being socially isolated, kept away from their friends, their school routines and extracurricular activities during the pandemic has proven to be difficult on youth," said lea...

Could Kids Swim Their Way to Better Vocabularies?

Kids may be able to swim their way to a deeper vocabulary.

That's the takeaway from a study in which researchers taught 48 kids ages 6 to 12 a few new words before they swam, did CrossFit-type exercises or coloring.

The swimmers did 13% better in follow up tests of the new words -- an outcome that did not surprise study author Madison Pruitt, a former college swimmer who conducted t...

Premature Delivery Raises Odds for Cerebral Palsy

Extremely premature babies have a much higher risk of cerebral palsy and other neurological conditions than full-term infants, a large Israeli study affirms.

Cerebral palsy -- the name for a group of lifelong conditions that affect movement and coordination -- is the most common cause of severe childhood physical disability and motor impairment. It can also affect sensation, perception, t...

Kids With Autism Have Unique Gut 'Microbiomes'

Children with autism differ socially and developmentally from their typically developing peers. Now, researchers say there are also differences in their array of healthy gut bacteria or "microbiome."

The findings may lead to earlier treatment for kids with an autism spectrum disorder, suggested the authors of a new small study.

The gut microbiome can vary according to where people l...

Most Parents Clueless About Overuse Dangers to Young Pitchers

Before you sign your young pitcher up to play baseball in multiple leagues, familiarize yourself with guidelines that can protect them against overuse injuries.

Sound obvious? A new survey shows it isn't, because most parents have no idea what those guidelines are.

Players under age 18 are pitching more and more frequently, often for several teams year-round, which is prompting a ri...

Severe COVID in Kids: Rare, but Brain Issues Can Result

About one in 20 kids hospitalized with COVID-19 develop debilitating brain or nerve complications that could haunt some for a long time, a new British study reports.

Children with severe infections can suffer from brain inflammation, seizures, stroke, behavior changes, hallucinations and psychosis.

About one-third of the stricken kids had symptoms that didn't resolve in the short te...

How Your Kid's Education Could Make You Healthier

If you're a parent, here's another reason to encourage your kids to get a good education: Children's educational successes or failures can impact their parent's physical and mental health, new research suggests.

For the study, researchers at the University at Buffalo in New York analyzed data from the ongoing U.S. National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health that began in 199...

Remote Learning Hurt High School Students Academically, Emotionally

There were academic, social and emotional consequences for U.S. high school students who attended classes remotely during the COVID-19 pandemic, new research shows.

The study included more than 6,500 students in Orange County Public Schools in Florida, who were surveyed in October 2020, when two-thirds were attending school remotely and one-third were attending in person.

On a 100-p...

Pesticide Harmed Children's Brains: Lawsuits

Lawsuits claiming that the widely used bug killer chlorpyrifos caused brain damage in children were filed Monday in California.

Past research has shown that the pesticide harms the brains of fetuses and children, the Associated Press reported.

Chlorpyrifos is approved for use on more than 80 crops, but was banned for household use in 2001. The U.S. Environmental Protection ...

Why Handwriting Still Beats Typing, Videos at Helping Folks Learn

Want to learn something new? Pick up your pencil.

New research suggests that despite the ease of using a computer for typing notes or watching videos, people learn certain skills significantly better and faster when writing them by hand.

"The question out there for parents and educators is, why should our kids spend any time doing handwriting," said senior study author Brenda Rapp, ...

School-Based Mindfulness Program Gives Big Boost to Young Kids' Sleep

Children tend to sleep less as they approach early adolescence, perhaps because of the pressures of homework and the presence of social media.

Now, new research suggests that loss of precious slumber is not inevitable.

The researchers found that a school-based program in mindfulness training -- which involves being present in the moment, deep breathing and yoga movements -- helped ...

Telehealth: Tips for Helping Kids With Autism Take Part

Telehealth is increasing in popularity in the United States, partly due to the pandemic. But some children with autism have difficulty sitting through these virtual appointments.

Yet those visits can be a helpful part of a child's ongoing medical care, and their convenience may help limit time away from work and school, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics' Healthy Children web...

Key to Good Sleep for Toddlers Starts in Infancy

Introducing bedtime routines very early in life can improve sleep habits in the toddler years, according to a new study.

Almost 500 new mothers were first surveyed when their infants were 3 months old. They were questioned again when the children were 12 months, 18 months and 24 months.

The mothers were asked about their child's sleep habits, including bedtime and wake time...

Gene-Based Embryo Selection: Are 'Designer Babies' on the Horizon?

The notion of parents picking out genetically perfect babies may seem like science fiction, but bioethicists warn in a new report that some companies have already started to offer couples going through in vitro fertilization (IVF) the means to pick better embryos through polygenic scoring.

Polygenic scores are a "weighted average of the contributions of all of the genes we have informatio...

What Drives Preschoolers' Curiosity to Learn?

Want to hold a preschooler's interest in learning something new? Give them just enough information to make them want to know more, a new study suggests.

This creates the perfect mix of uncertainty and curiosity in children, said researchers from Rutgers University, in New Jersey.

"There is an infinite amount of information in the real world," said lead study author Jenn...

More Evidence Spanking Kids Doesn't Work, Can Cause Harm

Is spanking good for parents? Is spanking good for kids? Is spanking good for anyone? No, no and no, according to a big new review of prior research.

"Zero studies found that physical punishment predicted better child behavior over time," said study co-author Elizabeth Gershoff, a professor of human development and family sciences at the University of Texas at Austin.

She and her t...

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