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Results for search "Psychology / Mental Health: Misc.".

15 Jul

HealthDay Now: Insulin Access

As the American Diabetes Association celebrated the 100th anniversary of the discovery of insulin, HealthDay spoke to to Dr. Robert Gabbay, chief scientific and medical officer of the group. Dr. Gabbay shared his thoughts on how to make insulin affordable and accessible to everyone who needs it.

20 May

Should You Use a Smartphone App for Therapy?

In a HealthDay Now interview, we spoke with Dr. Vivian Pender, president of the American Psychiatric Association. Here's what she had to say about the explosion of apps that now offer therapy to people on their smartphones.

20 Apr

High-Profile Police Brutality Cases Affect Black Americans' Mental Health

Black Americans are reporting more poor mental health days when two or more incidents of anti-Black violence occur, researchers say

Health News Results - 653

The Bigger the City, the Lower the Depression Rates?

TUESDAY, Aug. 3, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Americans living in big cities have relatively low rates of depression, despite the hustle and bustle -- or maybe because of it, a new study suggests.

Researchers found that compared with smaller U.S. cities, big urban hubs generally had lower rates of depression among residents. And they think the pattern can b...

AHA News: Protecting Children's Mental Health as They Head Back to School

At-home schooling was no vacation for Francis Huang and her 11-year-old daughter, Cheyenne Kuo.

The COVID-19 pandemic thrust remote learning upon their family in spring 2020. With it came the stresses now familiar to millions of families. "I think the whole year, we just tried to survive," said Huang, who lives in suburban Dallas.

In August, they finally leave all that behind, when ...

Acne Can Take Big Emotional Toll on Women

MONDAY, Aug. 2, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Acne is more than skin deep.

This is the overarching message of a new study that looked at the mental and psychological toll that acne can take on adult women.

"Some felt that their acne made them appear less professional or qualified at work, and many described that having fewer peers with acne in adulthood magnified the i...

Loneliness Raises Opioid Dangers in Seniors: Study

Illustrating a heartbreaking cycle, new research finds that lonely seniors are much more likely to take opioid painkillers, sedatives, anti-anxiety drugs and other medications.

This puts them at increased risk for drug dependency, attention problems, falls, accidents and mental decline, the University of California, San Francisco researchers warned.

"There's a misconception that as ...

Testosterone's Ties to Success May Be a Myth

Higher levels of testosterone don't give men or women an edge in life, claims a new study that challenges a common belief.

"There's a widespread belief that a person's testosterone can affect where they end up in life. Our results suggest that, despite a lot of mythology surrounding testosterone, its social implication...

Pandemic Boosted Paranoia and Conspiracy Theories, Study Confirms

The COVID-19 pandemic upended life in the United States in many ways. Now, a new study confirms another effect: paranoia and belief in conspiracy theories, especially in areas with low adherence to mask mandates.

"Our psychology is massively impacted by the state of the world around us," said study author Phil Corlett, an associate professor of psychology at Yale University, in New Haven...

How Trust in Science Can Make You Vulnerable to 'Pseudoscience'

Trusting science is good, but it could put you at risk for being duped by false science, or "pseudoscience," if you let your guard down, researchers warn.

Investigators found that people who trust science are more likely to believe and share false claims that contain scientific references than those who don't trust science.

"We conclude that trust in science, although desirable in m...

Who's Most Likely to Get Bullied at School?

TUESDAY, July 27, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Bullying remains a threat to American teens, and a new study reveals which kids may be at highest risk.

Race-based bullying takes a heavy toll on teens, the research found, but minority kids who are picked on for other reasons — whether gender, sexual orientation, religion, disability or immigration status — suffer a double...

Worry, Depression, Burnout: Survey Finds College Students Stressed as Fall Term Nears

Like many of her peers, Ohio State University engineering student Mary Trabue spent much of the pandemic taking classes online. And she was struggling.

"I don't know what was wrong, but I just felt tired all the time because I wasn't sleeping," she said. "And I knew I couldn't continue down that path."

Whether a question of COVID-related depression, anxiety, burnout or all of t...

Drug Shows Promise in Easing Dementia-Linked Psychosis

FRIDAY, July 23, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- A drug that eases hallucinations in people with Parkinson's disease may be able to do the same for those with dementia, a new clinical trial finds.

The medication, called Nuplazid (pimavanserin), is already approved in the United States for treating hallucinations and delusions related to Parkinson's.

The new study, publis...

PTSD Common After Sexual Assault, But Eases for Most

Most sexual assault survivors have post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) immediately after the attack, but it tends to lessen over the following months, a new study finds.

"One of the main takeaways is that the majority of recovery from post-traumatic stress happens in the first three months," said study lead author Emily Dworkin, an assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral scienc...

Empty Stadiums, COVID Fears: How Will It Affect Olympic Athletes?

To do their best, Olympic athletes need to be both physically and mentally fit, but the COVID-19 pandemic and its restrictions at the Tokyo Olympics has made that a real challenge, experts say.

"This Olympics is unprecedented," said Dr. Michael Lardon, an associate clinical professor of psychiatry at the University of California, San Diego.

The Tokyo Olympics itself, which officiall...

Lockdowns' Effects on Health Still Less Than Harm From Pandemic: Experts

While there's been much talk about pandemic lockdowns being a burden on people's health, new research finds the effects of large COVID-19 outbreaks are typically worse.

"It is unlikely that government interventions have been worse than the pandemic itself in most situations," say the authors of an international study published July 19 in the BMJ Global Health.

There's been ...

Severe COVID in Kids: Rare, but Brain Issues Can Result

About one in 20 kids hospitalized with COVID-19 develop debilitating brain or nerve complications that could haunt some for a long time, a new British study reports.

Children with severe infections can suffer from brain inflammation, seizures, stroke, behavior changes, hallucinations and psychosis.

About one-third of the stricken kids had symptoms that didn't resolve in the short te...

How Your Kid's Education Could Make You Healthier

If you're a parent, here's another reason to encourage your kids to get a good education: Children's educational successes or failures can impact their parent's physical and mental health, new research suggests.

For the study, researchers at the University at Buffalo in New York analyzed data from the ongoing U.S. National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health that began in 199...

Do Women or Men Make the Best Doctors?

MONDAY, July 19, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- When you're hospitalized, you'll want qualified medical professionals treating you, but does it matter if your doctor is a man or a woman?

It might.

A new study in Canada found that patients cared for by female physicians had lower in-hospital death rates than those who had male doctors.

"Our study overall shows th...

Friends, Family Key to Turning a 'No' on Vaccination to a 'Yes'

Public health officials and government workers are trying everything they can to promote COVID-19 vaccination — advertisements, news releases, cash lotteries, and even incentives like free beer, joints or doughnuts in some places.

But nothing sways a vaccine-hesitant person more than a word with a family member, friend or their own doctor, a new Kaiser Family Foundation (KFF) poll revea...

Remote Learning Hurt High School Students Academically, Emotionally

There were academic, social and emotional consequences for U.S. high school students who attended classes remotely during the COVID-19 pandemic, new research shows.

The study included more than 6,500 students in Orange County Public Schools in Florida, who were surveyed in October 2020, when two-thirds were attending school remotely and one-third were attending in person.

On a 100...

Most Romantic Couples Started Out as Friends, Study Finds

WEDNESDAY, July 14, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Some think that romance begins when two strangers catch each other's eye across a crowded room. Others seek it out by swiping right.

But new research suggests that more than two-thirds of all romantic relationships begin as friendships.

It's a question that Danu Anthony Stinson and her collaborators have been asking for...

Growing Up in Lead-Contaminated Area Might Alter Personality: Study

TUESDAY, July 13, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Can childhood lead exposure affect personality into adulthood?

Yes, a big multi-decade study suggests.

The finding stems from an analysis of data on atmospheric lead levels across the United States and 37 European nations since 1960. Lead levels were stacked up against responses to a personality survey of roughly 1.5 mill...

Sleepless Nights Can Quickly Mess Up Your Emotions

FRIDAY, July 9, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Groggy? Grumpy? Depressed? Just a few nights of poor sleep can take a big toll on your mental health, a new study confirms

"Many of us think that we can pay our sleep debt on weekends and be more productive on weekdays," said lead author Soomi Lee, an assistant professor in the School of Aging Studies at the University of South Florida.

"However, r...

Scientists Track Spirituality in the Human Brain

Researchers have identified specific brain circuitry that is related to people's sense of spirituality — and it's centered in a brain region linked to pain inhibition, altruism and unconditional love.

The findings add to research seeking to understand the biological basis for human spirituality.

"It is something of a treacherous subject to navigate," said lead researcher Michael F...

Autism & Drinking, Drug Abuse Can Be Dangerous Mix

Teens and adults with autism may be less likely than others to use drugs and alcohol, but new research finds those who do are nearly nine times more likely to use these substances to mask symptoms, including those related to autism.

This is known as camouflaging, and it has been linked to mental health issues and increased risk for suicide among people with autism.

"Seeing such star...

Depression Plagues Many Coal Miners With Black Lung Disease

Mental health problems and thoughts of suicide are common among U.S. coal miners with black lung disease, a new study finds.

Black lung is a progressive illness caused by inhaling toxic coal and rock dust in coal mines. There are few treatment options.

"Although coal mining is on the decline, the rates of black lung in Southwest Virginia continue to increase. Coal miners in Central...

Urinary Incontinence Can Affect a Woman's Mental Health

Millions of women are plagued by the daily disruptions of urinary incontinence, and new research suggests it might also be harming their mental health.

For the study, researchers analyzed data from 10,000 adult women who took part in a Portuguese Health Ministry survey conducted every five years. Overall, one in 10 reported having urinary incontinence, but the rate was four in 10 among wo...

1 in 20 College Students Has 'Internet Gaming Disorder,' Study Finds

WEDNESDAY, July 7, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Is it possible to become addicted to gaming on the internet?

Yes, warns new research that discovered when young people get too hooked it may trigger sleep difficulties, depression, anxiety and, in some cases, even suicidal thoughts.

Phone interviews conducted among nearly 3,000 American college students between 2007 and ...

State Lotteries Don't Boost COVID Vaccination Numbers: Study

Lotteries that pay cash and prizes to Americans who get vaccinated sound like a sure-fire recipe for success, but a new study finds they don't actually boost vaccination rates.

After media reports suggested that Ohio's "Vax-a-Million" lottery increased vaccination rates, other states decided to use lotteries to reinvigorate slowing vaccination rates.

"However, prior evaluations of t...

1 in 4 People With Anxiety, Depression Couldn't Get Care During Pandemic

In the middle of a pandemic that sent many Americans into bouts of emotional distress, one-quarter of them couldn't get counseling when they needed it the most, new research shows.

"Social isolation, COVID-related anxiety, disruptions in normal routines, job loss and food insecurity have led to a surge in mental illness during the pandemic," explained lead author Dr. Jason Nagata, an assi...

What Drives Preschoolers' Curiosity to Learn?

Want to hold a preschooler's interest in learning something new? Give them just enough information to make them want to know more, a new study suggests.

This creates the perfect mix of uncertainty and curiosity in children, said researchers from Rutgers University, in New Jersey.

"There is an infinite amount of information in the real world," said lead study author Jenn...

New Insights Into How Eating Disorders Alter the Brain

Behaviors associated with eating disorders can make real changes to the brain, new research shows. The findings could help explain why these serious disorders are often chronic -- and may also point the way to new treatments.

Eating disorders — such as anorexia nervosa, bulimia and binge-eating disorder — can result in severe complications, including death. Related behaviors include ...

'Transmitted Down the Leash:' Anxious Owners, Anxious Dogs

Dog obedience trainer Cindy Leung has a very anxious client who loves a very anxious breed, the Shetland Sheepdog.

"My [human] student startles at loud noises," Leung said. "That's just part of her personality. Loud, sudden noises startle her. Something weird that shows up in the environment startles her. She's got a really strong startle reflex, and her dogs have a strong startle reflex,...

Body's 'Signals' May Feel Different in People With Anorexia, Depression

The brain interprets physical signals differently in people with depression, anorexia and some other mental health disorders, new research shows.

British scientists examined "interoception" -- the brain's ability to sense internal conditions in the body -- in 626 patients with mental health disorders and a control group of 610 people without mental illness.

"Interoception is somethi...

Pandemic May Have Created a 'Baby Bust,' Not Boom

The pandemic not only cost hundreds of thousands of American lives, but it also appears to have triggered a deep drop in births, U.S. health officials reported Wednesday.

Until 2020, the birth rate had been declining about 2% a year, but that rate dropped to 4% with the start of the pandemic, researchers from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found.

"When you tak...

Marijuana Use Tied to Higher Odds for Thoughts of Suicide

Young adults who use marijuana appear to have an increased risk of suicidal thoughts and attempted suicide, according to a new study from the U.S. National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA).

In fact, the risk that someone between 18 and 34 will think about, plan for or attempt suicide increases with the amount of marijuana they use, according to results published June 22 in the journal J...

When Is Your Very Earliest Memory?

Your earliest memories may stretch back to a younger age than previously thought, new research suggests.

The study found that people can recall back to an average age of 2½ years old, which is a year earlier than suggested by previous studies.

The findings from the 21-year study were recently published online in the journal Memory.

"When one's earliest memory occurs,...

Survey Finds Many Adults Don't Want Kids -- and They're Happy

Marriage and children may be the norm for most Americans, but a new study shows that many people are choosing to remain child-free -- and they're happy that way.

The study of 1,000 Michigan adults found that one-quarter had opted not to have kids. And, on average, their life-satisfaction ratings were no different from those of parents or people who planned to have children.

On one h...

Could Fish Oil Supplements Help Fight Depression?

Fish oil supplements are often touted as good for your heart health, but a new study finds they may also help fight depression.

"Using a combination of laboratory and patient research, our study has provided exciting new insight into how omega-3 fatty acids bring about anti-inflammatory effects that improve depression," said lead author Alessandra Borsini, a postdoctoral neuroscientist at...

Dads of 'Preemie' Babies Can Be Hit by Depression

Postpartum depression strikes fathers of premature babies more often than previously thought, and it can linger longer in fathers than in mothers, a new study finds.

The researchers screened for depression in 431 parents of premature infants in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) and identified depression symptoms in 33% of mothers and 17% of fathers.

After the babies were brou...

Even Good Weather Didn't Lift Lockdown Blues: Study

In normal times, a sunny day can lift your mood while a stormy one can darken it, but new British research shows that weather had little effect on people's spirits during the pandemic.

"We know that lockdown restrictions, and the resulting impact on social life and the economy, are linked to at least two major negative public health consequences -- a reduction in physical exercise, both i...

Looking for Love? Young People's Drinking Goes Up When Dating

When young adults are seeking a casual dating relationship, drinking is likely to follow, new research suggests.

Meanwhile, those who are already in a serious relationship are likely to drink less.

The study included more than 700 people in the Seattle area, aged 18 to 25, who filled out surveys every month for two years. The study used a community sample that was not limited to col...

Big Rise in U.S. Teens Identifying As Gay, Bisexual

More teens in the United States are reporting their sexual identity as gay, lesbian or bisexual, nationwide surveys show.

Between 2015 and 2019, the percentage of 15- to 17-year-olds who said they identified as "non-heterosexual" rose from 8.3% to 11.7%, according to nationwide surveys by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

"Although our analyses demonstrated that t...

Teasing People About Weight Can Help Bring on Eating Disorders

What can make a young person vulnerable to eating disorders? Teasing them about any extra pounds they may carry, researchers say.

"Our findings add to the growing evidence that weight-based mistreatment is not helpful and is often harmful to the health of young people," said study leader Laura Hooper, a PhD student at the University of Minnesota's School of Public Health, in Minneapolis.<...

Big Rise in Suicide Attempts by U.S. Teen Girls During Pandemic

The suicide attempt rate has leapt by as much as half among teenage girls during the coronavirus pandemic, a new government study shows.

Emergency room visits for suspected suicide attempts among girls between the ages of 12 and 17 increased by 26% during summer 2020 and by 50% during winter 2021, compared with the same periods in 2019, researchers from the U.S. Centers for Disease Contro...

It's a Myth That Promiscuous Women Have Low Self-Esteem

The old double standard lives on.

A new study finds that many people still believe -- incorrectly -- that women who engage in casual sex have low self-esteem. And they don't think the same is true of men.

"We were surprised that this stereotype was so widely held," said study first author Jaimie Arona Krems, an assistant professor of psychology at Oklahoma State University. "This st...

'Laughing Gas' Shows Promise Against Tough-to-Treat Depression

When antidepressants fail to rein in hard-to-treat depression, the common anesthetic most know as "laughing gas" might be a safe and effective alternative, new research suggests.

The finding follows work with 28 patients struggling with "treatment-resistant major depression," a severe condition that investigators say affects about one-third of all patients - an estimated 17 million Americ...

'Early Birds' May Have Extra Buffer Against Depression

Could getting out of bed just one hour earlier every day lower your risk for depression?

Yes, claims new research that found an earlier start to the day was tied to a 23% lower risk of developing the mood disorder.

The study of more than 840,000 people found a link "between earlier sleep patterns and reduced risk of major depressive disorder," said study author Iyas Daghlas.

T...

Tennis Star Naomi Osaka's 'Time Out' Highlights Common, Crippling Mental Health Issue

On Tuesday, tennis star Naomi Osaka announced her withdrawal from the French Open. The reason: An ongoing battle with depression and anxiety.

As the world's No. 2 woman's tennis player and a four-time Grand Slam tournament winner at the age of just 23, many fans may have been taken aback that someone so young and successful might nonetheless battle with mental health issues.

Bu...

'Boomerang Kids': When an Adult Child Moves Back Home

It's a scenario fraught with potential conflict: Moving back home as an adult can be tough - on both the grown children and their parents.

But it can also come with opportunities, as long as expectations are established early, say some "boomerang kids" who moved back in with mom and/or dad after reaching adulthood.

A new study interviewed 31 of those young adults, aged 22 to 31, who...

Do You Live in a U.S. Opioid OD Hotspot?

The United States has more than two dozen regional hotspots for opioid overdose deaths, according to researchers who also found a link between fatal overdoses and mental distress.

Ohio, Pennsylvania, Kentucky, West Virginia, Indiana and Tennessee have the highest percentage of opioid overdose deaths, but researchers identified 25 regional overdose clusters nationwide.

The findings h...

Telehealth Is Growing in Use, Acceptance Among Americans: Poll

Many Americans have used telehealth and would turn to it for mental health care, a new online poll shows.

Conducted by the American Psychological Association (APA) from March 26 to April 5, the poll found that 38% had used telehealth to consult with a health professional, up from 31% last fall.

In all, 82% have used it since the start of the pandemic, the poll found. Most consultati...

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