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20 Sep

Losing Weight or Gaining Muscle - Which Improves Heart Health More?

Losing weight appears to do more for your heart health than gaining muscle, researchers say.

Health News Results - 98

Pandemic Curbed Kids' Efforts to Lose Excess Weight

A new study is highlighting yet another consequence of the COVID-19 pandemic: It has likely made it even harder for kids with obesity to manage their weight.

The findings, researchers said, are no surprise. Many adults, faced with normal life being upended during the pandemic, have seen changes on the bath...

Weight-Loss Surgery Slashes Risk of Severe Liver Disease in the Obese: Study

Weight-loss surgery sliced the risk of severe liver disease or liver cancer in obese people with fatty liver disease, a new study finds.

It included more than 1,100 patients with an aggressive type of fatty liver disease. Patients who had weight-loss (bariatric) surgery had a nearly 90% lower risk of advanced liver disease, liver cancer or related death over the next decade, The New Y...

Obese? Lose Lots of Weight, Watch Your Heart Risks Drop

It's no secret that excess weight is bad for the heart. But a new study suggests that obese people who lose a substantial amount of weight may reverse the related cardiovascular risks.

Researchers found the odds for high blood pressure and elevated cholesterol were similar in formerly obese Americans who were now at a healthy weight and people who had always had a healthy weight.

Di...

Weight Loss Surgery a Good Option for Severely Obese Kids: Study

Severely obese children who are unable to slim down should be eligible for weight loss surgery, a new study suggests.

The gastric sleeve procedure is safe and effective long-term, said a research team that followed participants as young as 5 for a decade.

"Lack of long-term data and some pediatricians' fears that bariatric [weight loss] surgery might affect children's linear g...

Strength Training Is No Slouch for Shedding Pounds

Strength training can help you lose weight, Australian researchers report.

Their new study reports you can lose a percentage of body fat through strength training alone that is similar to weight loss through cardio or aerobics.

"A lot of people think that if you want to lose weight, you need to go out and run," said researcher Mandy Hagstrom, an exercise physiologist and senior lect...

Obesity a Threat to Adults With Autism, But There May Be Help

Eating well and exercising regularly can be a challenge for anyone. But for those with autism spectrum disorder or intellectual disabilities, that challenge is exponentially greater.

Many young men and women with autism and intellectual disabilities face a significantly higher risk for obesity, and all the health complications that follow.

Yet, a small, new pilot study suggests...

Weight Loss in Childhood May Protect Boys Against Future Infertility

Obese boys who lose weight may avoid fertility problems in adulthood, a preliminary study suggests.

Even short-term weight loss might partially reverse weight-related alterations in reproductive function, the researchers said.

Childhood obesity can have serious effects on adulthood health, including a risk of cancer, heart disease and type 2 diabetes. Obesity has also been linked to...

What Helps Your Heart More, Losing Fat or Gaining Muscle?

Shedding excess weight does much more for the long-term heart health of young people than building muscle, new research suggests.

It's not that gaining muscle while young proved to be a cardiovascular problem. It's just that losing fat offered bigger heart benefits.

"We absolutely still encourage exercise," said study lead author Joshua Bell, a senior research associate in epidemiol...

Weight Loss Can Help Cut Lung Risks in 9/11 First Responders

Twenty years on from the terrible event itself, weight loss may reduce the risk of lung disease among 9/11 first responders, a new study suggests.

"Our findings should reassure World Trade Center first responders that there are steps they can take to protect their lungs even decades after exposure," said co-lead author Dr. Sophia Kwon. She's a fellow in the Division of Pulmonary, Critical...

Just 250 Fewer Calories Per Day Brings Big Health Rewards for Obese Seniors

Seniors, it may be easier than you think to undo the damage of decades of bad eating and precious little exercise.

New research shows that cutting just 250 calories a day and exercising moderately could lead to not only weight loss but improved vascular health in older obese adults.

These lifestyle changes may help offset age-related increases in aortic stiffness, which is a measure...

Mom's Weight-Loss Surgery Lowers Many Pregnancy Complications, Raises Others

Weight-loss surgery can be a double-edged sword for obese women who want to shed pounds before becoming pregnant: New research shows it lowers the risk of some complications, but it may increase the risk of others.

Investigators followed more than 20,000 women in California who became pregnant between 2007 and 2018. Of those, 9.3% had weight-loss (bariatric) surgery before their pregnanc...

Some COVID Survivors Can't Regain Weight Lost During Illness

Some people severely ill with COVID-19 may struggle to regain lost weight for months afterward, a new study shows.

While COVID-19 is primarily a respiratory illness, it's become clear that the infection can wreak havoc on the body in many ways. Gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms -- like nausea, diarrhea and even bleeding in the digestive tract -- are among the manifestations.

In some ca...

Weekly Injected Drug Could Boost Outcomes for Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

People with type 2 diabetes face heightened risks for heart attack and stroke, as well as progressive kidney disease. But a new once-a-week injected drug called efpeglenatide could greatly reduce their odds for those outcomes, new research shows.

The clinical trial was conducted in over 28 nations and involved more than 4,000 patients with type 2 diabetes.

Over two years, patients ...

No Good Evidence Weight Loss Supplements Work: Study

Losing weight is hard, but many weight loss supplements promise to make the journey easy. Unfortunately, there's little high-quality research to back these claims, a new study shows.

Hundreds of weight loss supplements like green tea extract, chitosan, guar gum and conjugated linoleic acid are being hawked by aggressive marketers. And an estimated 34% of Americans who want to lose weight ...

Weight-Loss Surgeries Used Least in U.S. States That Need Them Most

The American South and Midwest are home to the highest obesity rates in the nation, but a new study reveals that severely obese residents of those regions are the least likely to choose lifesaving weight-loss surgery.

"Bariatric surgery has been shown to provide long-term weight loss, sustained improvements in cardiovascular and metabolic health, and even prolonged longevity," noted ...

Tai Chi Equal to 'Regular' Exercise in Trimming Your Tummy

Could exercise that uses slow movements and breathing, like tai chi, do as much for trimming belly fat in older adults as aerobic exercise?

It might. A new study found that individuals aged 50 and up who practiced tai chi for 12 weeks lost about as much waist circumference as older adults who did conventional exercise (such as aerobics and strength training).

Though tai chi is consi...

Losing Weight Can Beat Diabetes and Also Help the Heart

An aggressive weight-loss program not only achieves remission of type 2 diabetes, but may also end the need for blood pressure medications, new research shows.

"Our study shows that, in addition to possible remission from type 2 diabetes, there are other very important health benefits, as weight loss is a very effective treatment for hypertension [high blood pressure] and its associated s...

Lost Weight? One Factor Can Keep It From Returning

Losing weight is hard, and keeping it off can be even harder. Now, a new study suggests that sitting less might make all the difference.

People who maintained their weight loss spent about three hours less each day sitting than did folks who were obese and stayed that way.

"That's a quite a difference," said study author Suzanne Phelan, a professor of kinesiology and public health ...

'Yo-Yo' Dieting May Mean Sleepless Nights for Women

So-called yo-yo dieting may increase a woman's risk of insomnia, sleep apnea and other sleep problems, a new study suggests.

Yo-yo dieting -- formally called weight cycling -- is defined as losing and regaining 10 pounds or more when not pregnant.

The study included more than 500 women in every stage of adult life, including childbearing, premenopausal, menopausal and postmenopausal...

Weight-Loss Surgery Might Also Help Prevent Cataracts

Weight-loss surgery can trim waistlines, and new research suggests it could also protect aging eyes.

The study found that after bariatric (weight-loss) surgery, a person's odds for cataracts can drop significantly, especially among younger patients.

Why might that be so? According to Swiss researchers, weight loss in obese patients may lower oxidative stress on cells, cellular ...

Reviews Find No Evidence Weight-Loss Supplements Work

You're getting no real benefit from taking weight-loss supplements like garcinia cambogia, green tea extract, glucomannan, conjugated linoleic acid or chitosan, two new reviews show.

Most of the clinical trials studied didn't show these supplements producing any weight loss among users, the researchers said. In the rare cases where people did lose weight, they didn't drop enough pounds to...

Pregnancy Within 1 Year of Weight-Loss Surgery Carries Added Risks

Women who get pregnant within a year of having weight-loss surgery are more likely to have preterm and smaller-than-normal babies, a new study suggests.

Dutch researchers said their findings support current recommendations to avoid pregnancy for 12 to 24 months after weight-loss (bariatric) surgery.

"We should encourage women who wish to conceive after bariatric surgery to avoid pre...

Drug Saxenda Aids Weight Loss -- But You Should Exercise, Too

The weight-loss drug Saxenda can keep extra pounds off -- but combining it with exercise brings a bigger payoff, a new clinical trial finds.

The study found that some longstanding advice is valid: Prescription weight-loss drugs work best when used along with -- and not in place of -- lifestyle changes.

Saxenda (liraglutide) is a prescription drug approved in the United States for sp...

You Don't Have to Be Obese for Belly Fat to Harm You, Heart Experts Warn

Extra padding around the belly can spell trouble for the heart, even if you're not technically overweight.

That's among the conclusions of a new scientific statement from the American Heart Association (AHA), where experts lay out the heart risks of being "apple-shaped."

It encourages doctors to dust off those old-fashioned tape measures and make waist circumference part of patients...

Can Fitbits Be a Dieter's Best Friend?

Looking to shed some of those pandemic pounds? A new analysis says wearables like Fitbit and Apple Watch can help people slim down.

The researchers examined studies involving commercial health wearables and adults who were overweight/obese or had a chronic health condition.

After daily moderate-to-vigorous physical activity for a period between a month and a year, participants lost ...

Common Type 2 Diabetes Meds Won't Raise Breast Cancer Risk: Study

Widely used diabetes and obesity drugs don't increase the risk of breast cancer, a new study indicates.

The drugs -- called glucagon like peptide-1 receptor agonists or GLP-1 RAs for short -- are effective in treating type 2 diabetes and obesity and in reducing heart disease. But some previous studies have suggested a possible link between them and breast cancer.

GLP-1RAs include al...

Injected Drug Delivers Up to 20% Weight Loss in Trial

A new weight-loss drug is almost twice as effective as current medications, clinical trial results show, and experts say it could revolutionize the treatment of obesity.

Overweight and obese people lost an average 15% of their body weight using a weekly injectable 2.4 milligram dose of semaglutide (Ozempic), a new report reveals.

What's more, one-third of all participants lost 20% o...

For Rising Number of People, Obesity Is a Literal Headache

As worldwide obesity rates continue to soar, new research shows that growing numbers of people are developing a potentially blinding type of weight-linked headache that was once considered rare.

Though the study was conducted in Wales, one U.S. expert said the same surge in these headaches is likely happening in this country and elsewhere, but he cautioned that just because someone is obe...

Exercise Doesn't Boost Health If You Stay Obese, Study Finds

The harmful effects of obesity on the heart can't be undone by exercise, and it's not possible to be "fat but healthy," Spanish researchers warn.

"Exercise does not seem to compensate for the negative effects of excess weight," said study author Alejandro Lucia, a professor of exercise physiology at European University in Madrid.

The study findings "refute the notion that a physical...

Cold Weather Exercise Could Burn More Fat

If you want to burn fat this winter, take your exercise outdoors, researchers say.

A Canadian study suggests that vigorous exercise in cold weather may burn more fat than working out indoors.

Regular physical activity speeds metabolism and helps regulate fat in the blood ("lipids"), and high-intensity training is better for burning fat than moderate-intensity exercise, the rese...

5-Step 'Healthy Living' Plan May Ease Chronic Heartburn

For some people with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), also known as chronic heartburn, a switch to a healthier lifestyle could offer real relief from symptoms,.

New research shows that following a five-step plan -- not smoking, eating well, exercising, limiting coffee, tea and soda, and maintaining a healthy body weight -- may relieve reflux in many patients. Others may have less n...

Do Genes Doom Some Kids to Obesity? Probably Not, Study Finds

While childhood obesity is a significant challenge, German researchers have uncovered some hopeful news while investigating the impact of genes.

Though some "obesity genes" do play a minor role in the success of weight loss interventions, environmental, social and behavioral factors make the biggest difference, according to a new study from the Technical University of Munich.

Those ...

Common Weight-Loss Surgery Can Weaken a Teen's Bones

Sleeve gastrectomy, a procedure used to help obese people lose weight, may damage the bones of teen patients, a new study finds.

"Childhood obesity is a major public health issue that has increased over the last 10 years," said researcher Dr. Miriam Bredella, a professor of radiology at Harvard Medical School. "Sleeve gastrectomy is the most common bariatric surgery procedure performed in...

Calorie Count: Eating Early Doesn't Boost Weight Loss

If you're overweight, eating most of your calories early in the day won't boost the benefit of a healthy diet, new research suggests.

In a 12-week study, 41 people ate the same healthy diet, but one group ate 80% of their calories before 1 p.m. and the other group ate 50% of their calories after 5 p.m.

All participants consumed the same prepared, healthy meals. Weight and blood...

Nearly 1 in 5 Americans Follows 'Special' Diet

No doubt you've heard friends lament they couldn't eat bread because they were on the Keto diet, or maybe it was Paleo, or a low-carb plan or perhaps they were forgoing gluten. It's hard to keep track.

That's because lots of Americans are following a special diet. On any given day, about one in six Americans reports eating a "special" diet, a new U.S. government study finds.

A spec...

Could an Antibody Drug Help You Shed Pounds?

An experimental antibody drug that targets one of the body's key metabolism regulators may help obese people lose weight -- at least briefly.

That's one finding from an early study that tested the injection drug, which mimics the effects of a natural hormone called fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21). In the body, FGF21 helps govern metabolism, calorie-burning and food intake.

Resea...

Weight-Loss Surgery Lengthens Life Span, Study Shows

Obesity is tied to premature death, but researchers have found that weight-loss surgery can add a few years to your life.

In a study involving more than 4,000 obese people, those who had obesity, or bariatric, surgery lived three years longer on average than those who didn't. But life expectancy was nearly six years less than for non-obese individuals.

"Our finding will he...

Weight-Loss Surgery May Cut Pancreatic Cancer Risk in People With Diabetes

Weight-loss surgery significantly reduces the risk of pancreatic cancer in obese people with diabetes, a new study finds.

For the study, the researchers analyzed 20 years of data from 1.4 million people, including more than 10,000 who'd had weight-loss surgery. About three-quarters of those who had weight-loss surgery were women.

People who'd had weight-loss surgery were les...

Pancreas Size, Shape Can Return to Normal in Diabetes Remission: Study

Reversing type 2 diabetes can restore the pancreas to its normal size and shape, a new study finds.

Previous research found that with remission of type 2 diabetes through significant weight loss, natural insulin-production can return to levels similar to people who have never had diabetes.

The new study is the first to show that reversing diabetes can also affect the size an...

Do Fasting Diets Really Work? New Study Finds Little Benefit

More and more people are turning to "intermittent fasting" to lose weight, but the jury is still out on whether the tactic works.

In a new clinical trial, researchers found that one type of intermittent fasting did help overweight and obese adults drop a couple of pounds over 12 weeks. But they fared no better than a comparison group who ate whenever they wanted.

The finding...

Even If Hips, Legs Slim Down, Belly Fat Remains a Health Danger

Gaining weight around your mid-section may be the makings of much more than a wardrobe crisis: It may also signal the start of a serious health crisis.

So warns a team of Canadian and Iranian researchers who conducted an extensive review of 72 studies involving more than 2.5 million patients from all over the globe.

"We found that excess fat in the abdomen -- called central...

New Weight-Loss Program Shows Promise Among Low-Income Americans

Lifestyle interventions can help people lose weight, but experts have worried whether such programs can work in low-income communities where obesity rates can be high and access to health care can be limited.

Until now.

A new study found that when these programs are made accessible, meaningful weight loss can be achieved.

The research team, led by Peter Katzmarzy...

After a Heart Attack, a Joint Effort to Lose Weight Works Best

Heart attack survivors are more likely to lose weight if their spouses join them in shedding excess pounds, new research shows.

"Lifestyle improvement after a heart attack is a crucial part of preventing repeat events," said study author Lotte Verweij, a registered nurse and Ph.D. student at Amsterdam University of Applied Sciences, in the Netherlands. "Our study shows that when spous...

Don't Wait to Lose Weight: Shedding Obesity in Youth Extends Life

Obesity can kill, contributing to the development of cancer, heart disease and diabetes. But losing weight before middle age arrives can help prevent early death, a new study shows.

The researchers tracked health data for more than 24,000 people, considering obesity, weight loss and risk of early death. The study found that people who were obese at age 25 but lost weight between earl...

How Much Fasting Is Enough for 'Fasting Diet' to Work?

Limiting food to a narrow window of time each day may help people shed some extra pounds, a small study finds.

And restricting your eating to six hours may work as well as a stricter four-hour time frame, researchers found.

In an eight-week trial, researchers found that either of two "time-restricted" diets helped obese people drop some pounds -- about 3% of their star...

Working Off Your Quarantine Weight Gain

Life in lockdown has led many to overeat and gain weight, a phenomenon referred to as the "COVID-15."

But some small changes can get you back into shape, a weight management specialist suggests.

"COVID-19 changed how we eat, what we eat and how we spend our day," said Dr. Peter Jian, an assistant professor of family and community medicine at the Baylor College of Medicine ...

Telehealth May Help Rural Americans Keep the Weight Off

Although many people can lose weight, few maintain the loss. Could individual telephone support be the key to keeping extra pounds at bay?

New research suggests that telehealth counseling after weight loss may be just the support that people in rural areas need to maintain their weight loss long-term. At the 12-month point in the study, people who had individual telephone counseling ...

Eating Before Bedtime Might Pack on the Pounds

If you have a late dinner and then head to bed, beware: You may gain weight while you sleep, a new study suggests.

That's most likely because your metabolism slows, boosting blood sugar and other chemicals that contribute to weight gain and type 2 diabetes, researchers say.

"It's not just what you eat, but when you eat that may be a factor in promoting conditions like obes...

Obesity Is Biggest Type 2 Diabetes Risk Factor

Whether you have a low or a high genetic risk for type 2 diabetes, obesity seems to be the driving factor in developing the disease, Danish researchers say.

Their new study found that obesity increased the risk of type 2 diabetes by at least six times, no matter what a person's genetic risk was.

"Obesity and unfavorable lifestyle are associated with increased risk of type ...

Women in Their 50s Can Lower Their Stroke Risk - Here's How

If you're a middle-aged woman, it's not too late to make lifestyle changes that could significantly reduce your risk of stroke, researchers say.

"We found that changing to a healthy lifestyle, even in your 50s, still has the potential to prevent strokes," said lead author Goodarz Danaei, an associate professor of cardiovascular health at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

...

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