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High Medical Bills Tied to Worse Outcomes for Younger Cancer Survivors

U.S. cancer survivors under age 65 with medical-related financial struggles have an increased risk of early death, a new study finds.

"Our findings show the need to address financ...

Blood Type May Predict Which Cancer Patients Are Prone to Clots

Cancer patients' blood type may play a role in their risk for dangerous blood clots, researchers say.

Cancer and its treatments increase the risk for venous thromboembolism (VTE). That includes de...

More Than Half of Cancer Survivors Fear a Recurrence

You've battled and beaten back a bout of cancer, so now you can take comfort in your victory, right?

Wrong, claims new research that found most cancer patients and survivors fear their disease will return once treatment end...

Hints That Breakthrough CAR-T Therapy May Fight Solid Tumor Cancers

An immune system-based therapy that's proven effective against blood cancers also might prove useful in battling solid tumor cancers, early clinical trial data show.

A small group of patients with testicular and

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • April 11, 2022
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  • Black Cancer Patients Frailer Than Their Peers

    Older Black American cancer patients have higher rates of frailty and disability than their white peers, which may help explain why Black patients also have higher cancer death rates, new research suggests.

    The researchers noted that Black patients are more likely to die from cancer than most other groups, despite efforts to reduce

  • By Robert Preidt HealthDay Reporter
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  • April 11, 2022
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  • Some Sick Patients Get Cosmetic Surgery to Boost Appearance

    Some patients with serious illnesses get cosmetic surgery to look healthier and be more comfortable in social situations or at work, a small study finds.

    Researchers interviewed 12 patients who had cosmetic surgery at the start or during treatment for conditions such as stroke, advanced melanoma, prostate cancer, advanced cervical or thyroid cancer and Hodgkin’s lymphoma.

    "Patient...

    Out-of-State Residents Can Now Seek Medical Aid in Dying in Oregon

    Oregon will no longer require terminally ill patients to be residents of the state to use its law allowing physician aid in dying.

    A lawsuit that challenged the residency requirement as unconstitutional was settled Monday, with the Oregon Health Autho...

    Cancer Patients Vulnerable to Depression, Suicide

    Cancer can be a devastating diagnosis, and now two new studies show these patients are at increased risk for anxiety, depression and suicide.

    The fi...

    High-Tech Drug Infusion Pumps in Hospitals Vulnerable to Damage, Hackers

    You've probably seen an infusion pump, even though the name might make it sound like a mysterious piece of medical technology.

    These devices govern the flow of IV medications and fluids into patients. They help deliver extra fluids to people in the emergency room, administer monoclonal antibodies to folks with COVID-19, and pump chemotherapy drugs to cancer patients.

    "If you're watc...

    Crowdfunding Can Help Pay for Cancer Care, But Takes Emotional Toll

    Crowdfunding helps some U.S. cancer patients pay bills, but it can trigger shame and other negative feelings in some people, a new study finds.

    "Young adults are at that point in life where they are beginning to achieve financial independence and finding career employment," said study first author Lauren Ghazal, a postdoctoral nursing student at the University of Michigan, in Ann Arbor. "...

    Getting Rid of Meat in Your Diet May Lower Cancer Risk

    People who go meat-free, or at least put limits on it, may have lower risks of some of the most common cancers, a new, large study suggests.

    British researchers stressed that their findings do not prove definitively that vegetarian/vegan diets cut people's cancer risks. In fact, there ...

    Pandemic Put Brakes on Lifesaving Cancer Research, Care

    While the pandemic has undermined public health in countless ways, a new report warns that the pandemic has been particularly hard on cancer patients and cancer research alike.

    "As much as so many people have been vaccinated, and we continue to find new and exciting treatments [for COVID-19], it's been an exhausting and difficult year," Sen. Amy Klobuchar said in a videotaped message pres...

    FDA Panel Rejects Lilly’s Cancer Drug Tested Only in China

    A new lung cancer drug that has only been tested in China was soundly rejected by an advisory panel to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Thursday.

    Known as sintilimab, the treatment is a type of immunotherapy that unleashes the immune system to attack tumors. It was developed and tested in China by Innovent Biologics, which entered into an agreement with Eli Lilly that...

    White House's Top Science Advisor Resigns After Probe Into 'Disrespectful' Behavior

    Dr. Eric Lander, the director of the White House's Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP), has resigned after the findings of an internal investigation that he violated workplace policies became public.

    In a statement issued Monday evening, White House press secretary Jen Psaki said that, "The President accepted Dr. Eric Lander's resignation letter this evening with gratitude for ...

    Exercise Might Boost Outcomes for People Battling Esophageal Cancer

    Alan Holman didn't stop exercising when told he had cancer, and he's glad of it, now that U.K. researchers say moderate exercise may improve chemotherapy outcomes in esophageal cancer patients.

    Holman, 70, was diagnosed with esophageal cancer in December 2016, shortly after retiring from his job as a facilities manager at a shopping mall in Britain. Like many patients, he underwent

    Many Teens Don't Realize STD Risks From Oral Sex: Poll

    Many American teens and young adults underestimate the risk of sexually transmitted infections from unprotected oral sex, and that's especially true of young men, a new survey shows.

    Doctors say oral sex can transmit herpes, gonorrhea, chlamydia, syphilis, HIV and human papillomavirus (HPV), which can lead to cervical cancer, and head and neck cancers.

    While there is an

  • Robert Preidt
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  • February 2, 2022
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  • Shedding Pounds Might Help Stop Pre-Cancerous Colon Polyps

    Colon cancer rates are increasing for younger Americans, along with rates of obesity. Could slimming down reduce young people's risk for malignancy?

    A new study suggests that even a small amount of weight loss may cut your odds for benign growths in the colon known as adenomas, or polyps. Left unchecked, these growths can lead to

    Late-Stage Colon Cancers Increasing Among Young Americans

    Yet another study is chipping away at the idea that colon and rectal cancers are diseases of older age: In the past couple decades, Americans younger than 40 have shown the steepest rise in advanced cases of these cancers.

    The research adds to evidence of a disturbing, and not yet completely understood, increase in early-onset

  • Amy Norton HealthDay Reporter
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  • January 31, 2022
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  • Most Americans Don't Know Alcohol Can Raise Cancer Risk

    Most American adults don't know that alcohol boosts cancer risk, but a majority support steps to increase awareness of the link, a new nationwide survey shows.

    ""It is important that people are made fully aware of the potential harms of alcohol so that they may make informed decisions about alcohol consumption," said study author Kara Wiseman. She's an assistant professor of public health...

    Pre-Op Treatment May Be Advance Against Deadly Liver Cancers

    When delivering a liver cancer diagnosis, Dr. Thomas Marron pulls no punches: "Liver cancer is one of the deadliest cancers," he tells patients.

    Jeffrey Foster heard a similar message loud and clear when he was first diagnosed by another doctor with hepatocellular carcinoma -- the most common type of liver cancer

    Newer Rheumatoid Arthritis Drug Might Raise Heart, Cancer Risks

    Finding the right medication for rheumatoid arthritis isn't easy, and a newer pill against the disease carries higher risks of heart attack, stroke and cancer than older RA drugs, a new clinical trial confirms.

    The study was mandated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration after earlier safety signals about the drug, called tofacitinib (Xeljanz).

    In response to the findings, ...

    Extra 10 Minutes of Daily Activity Could Save 110,000 U.S. Lives Annually

    Americans, get up out of that chair and get moving.

    If everyone between 40 and 85 years of age were active just 10 minutes more a day, it could save more than 110,000 U.S. lives a year, a large study reports.

    "Our projections are based on an additional 10 minutes of moderate to vi...

    Side Effects From New Cancer Meds Have Silver Lining

    Skin side effects caused by cancer drugs called immune checkpoint inhibitors may be a telltale sign that the drugs are working, according to a new study.

    Immune checkpoint inhibitors, a type of immunotherapy, boost the body's immune response against tumor cells and have become standard care for many patients with advanced cancer. However, many experience skin side effects from the drugs.<...

    VA Study Shows Black Men Twice as Likely to Develop Prostate Cancer as Whites

    Even in a setting where white and Black people have equal access to medical care, Black Americans fare worse than whites in terms of prostate cancer, new research shows.

    A review of nearly 8 million men seen at America's Veterans Affairs (VA) hospitals found that Black veterans had nearly twice the incidence of localized and advanced

  • Steven Reinberg HealthDay Reporter
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  • January 19, 2022
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  • Newer Hormone Treatments for Prostate Cancer May Raise Risk of Depression

    TUESDAY, Jan. 18, 2022 (HealthDay Now) -- Advanced forms of hormone therapy are very effective at keeping prostate cancer in check, but they also can double a man's risk of falling into depression, researchers have found.

    Prostate cancer patients treated with the latest forms of hormone blockers were twice as likely to develop depression compared with men treated with older forms of hormo...

    Immune-Based Drug Fights Advanced Endometrial Cancer: Study

    A drug used to treat several types of cancer is also an effective treatment for aggressive forms of endometrial cancer, the second most common cancer in women worldwide, a new clinical trial shows. The endometrium is the inner lining of the uterus.

    "These findings suggest a long-term benefit to patients," said lead researcher Dr. David O'Malley, a gynecologic oncologist at the Ohio State ...

    Progress on Lung Cancer Drives Overall Decline in U.S. Cancer Deaths

    A new report offers hope on the lung cancer front: Patients are being diagnosed at an earlier stage in their disease and living longer due to better access to care, higher screening rates and improved treatments.

    And that is driving overall cancer rates down, researchers discovered.

    Still, lung cancer remai...

    Medicaid Rules May Affect Americans' Cancer Survival

    The chance of someone who is covered by Medicaid surviving cancer may depend in part on where they live, a new analysis finds.

    In states that had lower Medicaid income eligibility limits, cancer survival rates were worse for cancers both in early and late stages compared to states with higher Medicaid income eligibility limits, Amer...

    More Olive Oil May Bring Longer Life: Study

    Swapping out the butter or other artery-clogging fats in your diet for heart-healthy olive oil may add years to your life, researchers say.

    Folks who consume more than 1/2 a tablespoon of olive oil a day are less likely to die from heart disease, cancer, neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's or lung disease when compared to people who consume less of this

  • Denise Mann HealthDay Reporter
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  • January 11, 2022
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  • Too Much Sitting Could Mean Worse Outcomes for Cancer Survivors

    Beating cancer is a huge feat, but how survivors live their lives afterwards also influences their longevity. A new study shows those who sit too much and are not physically active are much more likely to die early from cancer or any other cause than those who are more active.

    Data on c...

    Drug Combo Boosts Outcomes for Advanced Melanoma

    For people newly diagnosed with advanced melanoma, a combination of two immunotherapy drugs can double the amount of time their cancer remains progression-free, a clinical trial has found.

    The treatment combines two drugs known as immune checkpoint inhibitors. One, called nivolumab (Opdivo), is already standard for advanced melanoma; the other, relatlimab, is not yet approved.

    But b...

    You Can Help Prevent Cervical Cancer

    Cervical cancer is the only gynecologic cancer that can be prevented, yet there were more than 4,000 deaths in the United States in 2021 and nearly 14,500 new cases, the American Cancer Society says.

    The best way to prevent this is to make sure you and your children get their human papillomavirus vaccines, experts noted.

    Nearly all cervical cancer stems from HPV, which will first c...

    Dirty City Air Killed More Than 1.8 Million People Globally in 2019

    Cities worldwide are shrouded with air pollution -- and it’s killing people.

    A new modeling study found that 86% of people living in cities throughout the world -- a total of 2.5 billion people -- are exposed to fine particulate matter at levels that exceed the World Health Organization’s 2005 guidelines.

    In 2019, this urban air pollution led to 1.8 million excess deaths, acco...

    Quitting Smoking Ups Survival After Lung Cancer Diagnosis

    For smokers, new research suggests it really is never too late to quit.

    The study found that folks who kick their habit after a lung cancer diagnosis will likely live longer than those who continue lighting up.

    Investigators from Italy concluded that lung cancer patients who stop smoking at or around the time of their diagnosis can look forward to survival times nearly a third (29%...

    Many Cancer Patients Face Mounting Bills Despite Having Insurance

    Many insured cancer patients still experience serious money problems linked to their illness, new research affirms.

    For example, nearly 3 out of 4 insured patients with colon cancer have major financial hardship in the year after their diagnosis, which affects their social functioning and quality of life, according to

  • Steven Reinberg HealthDay Reporter
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  • January 4, 2022
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  • More Than 10 Million People Died of Cancer Worldwide in 2019

    Cancer remains a major killer, with 10 million deaths reported worldwide in 2019.

    More than 23 million new cases were documented globally in 2019, according to researchers at the University of Washington School of Medicine.

    By comparison, in 2010 there were 8.29 million cancer deaths worldwide and fewer than 19 million new cases. Deaths were nearly 21% higher in 2019 than 2010, and...

    Black Men Get Better Outcomes From Radiation Rx for Prostate Cancer

    A new analysis uncovers a racial paradox in prostate cancer care: While Black men are often diagnosed later and with more aggressive disease than white men, radiation therapy seems to work better for them than for their white peers.

    To come to that conclusion, researchers reviewed seven trials comprising more than 8,800 men with

  • Denise Mann HealthDay Reporter
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  • January 3, 2022
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  • New Clues to How Ovarian Cancer Begins -- and Might Be Prevented

    Researchers say they may be closer than ever to detecting ovarian cancer earlier and improving the odds for women with this life-threatening disease.

    In a new study, scientists used stem cells created from the blood samples of women with BRCA mutations and ovarian cancer to fashion a model of fallopian tube tissue.

    There, they found first hints of ovarian cancer in the fallopian tu...

    'Breakthrough' COVID Infections Can Still Be Deadly for Cancer Patients

    MONDAY, Dec 27, 2021 (HealthDay News)-- When fully vaccinated cancer patients develop a breakthrough case of COVID-19, most will become seriously ill and end up hospitalized, a new study finds.

    The conclusion stems from the experience of 54 cancer patients who developed COVID-19.

    Sixty-five percent were hospitalized following infection, while nearly 1 in 5 (19%) were placed on a mec...

    Could a High-Fiber Diet Help Boost Cancer Survival?

    People undergoing immune-boosting therapy for advanced melanoma may respond better if they eat a high-fiber diet, a new study hints.

    Researchers said much more study is needed, but their initial findings -- in both melanoma patients and lab mice -- suggest that

    Genes 'Switched On' Much Earlier in Human Embryos Than Thought

    Genes in human embryos become active far sooner than once thought, according to a study that provides fresh insight into development.

    Contrary to the old view that gene activity begins two to three days after conception when the embryo is made up of four to eight cells, researchers found that it actually begi...

    Coping With Cancer and COVID During the Holidays

    Tempting as it is to mingle with friends and relatives, anyone with cancer should take extra precautions this holiday season to avoid COVID-19. Their families also need to be cautious to help protect them, experts say.

    Yale Cancer Center reminds people who are living with cancer that the disease and treatments can put a patient at risk for serious illness from the coronavirus, even if th...

    CT Lung Cancer Screening Saved His Life, and Could Do So for More

    Wolfgang Lehner always considered himself "a triple threat" when it came to cancer risk.

    One grandfather died of lung cancer in the 1970s. His other grandfather had his own bout with stomach cancer. And Lehner himself was a smoker.

    Although the New York City cinematographer quit smoking in 2010, at age 51, he never quit worrying about lung cancer.

    In 2017 his worst fear was r...

    HPV Vaccination Could Rid U.S. of Most Mouth, Throat Cancers in Men

    How do you prevent nearly 1 million cases of mouth and throat cancers in American men in this century? Find a way to reach an 80% HPV vaccination rate among adolescents, a new study suggests.

    HPV vaccination protects against the human papillomavirus (HPV), which is the leading cause of cancer in the oropharynx. It's...

    Program Aims to Get Lifesaving Drugs to Kids With Cancer in Poorer Countries

    A new program to boost the supply of cancer medicines for children in low- and middle-income countries has been announced by the World Health Organization (WHO) and St. Jude Children's Research Hospital.

    The hospital is making a six-year, $200 million investment to launch the Global Platform for Access to Childhood C...

    COVID Helps Drive Nearly Two-Year Decline in U.S. Life Expectancy

    WEDNESDAY, Dec. 22, 2021 (HealthDay News) - - COVID-19 is now the third leading cause of death for Americans and has shortened life expectancy by nearly two years, a drop not seen since World War II, a new government report shows.

    Life expectancy dropped from 78.8 in 2010 to 77 in 2020 as the age-adjusted death rate increased 17%, going from 715 deaths per 100,000 people in 2019 to 835 d...

    Throat Cancers Tied to HPV Are Rising Among U.S. Men, Women

    You might have heard a lot about the human papillomavirus (HPV) and its role in cervical cancer, but this sexually transmitted virus can also cause another type of cancer.

    Rates of oropharyngeal cancer, which occurs in the middle part of the throat, are rising rapidly among older men throughout the United States. They're also growing among women in the Southeast and Midwest.

    Investi...

    Proctor & Gamble Recalls Pantene, Herbal Essences Products Due to Benzene

    Proctor & Gamble has voluntarily recalled several dry shampoo sprays and hair conditioner spray products with brand names Pantene, Herbal Essences, Aussie and Waterless because of benzene contamination.

    This follows an earlier recall of some aerosol spray Old S...

    Supplements: Many Cancer Patients Think They'll Help, But Experts Urge Caution

    Many cancer patients take dietary supplements in hopes of keeping their disease at bay, but British researchers say there's little evidence it will pay off.

    In fact, they add, supplements may not only be ineffective, but harmful as well.

    "We found 1 in 5 people who had been treated for cancer mistakenly thought that taking vitamins or other supplements would help reduce the ris...

    Over 60? You Have Billions of Potentially Cancer-Causing Cells

    Have you just turned 60 and feel like you're in great health?

    Well, new research suggests that unseen dangers lurk: Scientists found that cancer-free people older than 60 have at least 100 billion cells with at least one cancer-associated mutation.

    But there's good news, too: The vast majority of these mutations won't do anything and most people (60%) will go their entire lives wit...

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