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Health News Results - 244

FDA Warns of Rare Cases of Certain Cancers Linked to Breast Implants

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Thursday warned doctors and their patients about rare cases of squamous cell carcinoma and various lymphomas developing in the scar tissue that forms around breast implants.

Too Little Exercise, Too Much Sitting Could Raise Breast Cancer Risk

Sitting on the couch or behind a desk could be increasing your risk of breast cancer, a new genetics-driven study suggests.

People more likely to engage in physical activity based on their DNA had a 41% lower risk of invasive breast cancer, researchers report.

Previous research also has shown a link betwe...

Efforts to Preserve Fertility Won't Affect Breast Cancer Outcomes

Fertility preservation procedures for women with breast cancer won't raise the risk of their cancer returning later, a new Swedish study shows.

Women who had eggs or embryos frozen before going through chemotherapy did not have any increased risk of cancer recurrence or de...

Olivia Newton-John, Singer and Actress, Dies at 73

Australian singer Olivia Newton-John, a major pop star and actress of the '70s and '80s known for her role in the blockbuster movie "Grease," died on Monday. She was 73.

"Dame Olivia Newton-John passed away peacefully at her Ranch in Southern California this morning, surrounded by family and friends. We ask that everyone please respect the family's privacy during this very difficult time,...

Breast Cancer Treatment Effects on Sex Life a Hidden Burden

Women with breast cancer commonly see their sexual health decline, yet their doctors aren't telling them what to expect -- or what to do about it.

Those are among the findings of a new study that asked breast cancer patients about their sexual well-being. It showed that most women had sexu...

When Genes Raise a Mom's Risk for Cancer, Is It OK to Tell Kids?

It's important to talk to kids about family health risks, but the impact of sharing this kind of information has been unclear.

It's probably safe, according to a new study, but how are you supposed to do it -- and when?

Researchers found that kids generally have no problem coping when cancer risk information is shared with them. But it's not uncommon for parents to struggle with com...

Keytruda Extends Survival for Women With an Aggressive Breast Cancer

Adding the drug Keytruda to standard chemotherapy can extend the lives of some women with an aggressive form of breast cancer, a new study finds.

The study involved women with advanced triple-negative breast cancer, a hard-to-treat form of the disease. Keytruda (pembrolizumab) is already approved in the Un...

Hormone Replacement Therapy Won't Raise Recurrence Rate for Breast Cancer Survivors

Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) for breast cancer survivors doesn't appear to increase the risk of cancer recurrence or death, Danish researchers report.

Although HRT has previously been linked to a rais...

Abortion Bans Could Put Lives of Cancer Patients in Jeopardy

The U.S. Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade will limit cancer treatment options for pregnant women and put lives needlessly at risk, America's leading cancer societies warn.

About one in every 1,000 women who are pregnant will wind up being diagnosed wi...

Motherhood Doesn't Lower Survival for Women Who've Had Breast Cancer

Breast cancer survivors who would like to have a baby can take some reassurance from a new study that finds motherhood doesn't lower their future survival chances.

Moreover, survival rates were no worse in younger women, those who had not been pregnant before or those with

  • By Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • July 7, 2022
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  • Why Do Black Women Have More Delays for Lifesaving Breast Biopsies?

    Women of color may face delays in getting a biopsy after a screening mammogram suggests they might have breast cancer, a large, new study finds.

    Researchers found that compared with white women, Asian, Black and Hispanic women were all more likely to wait over a month ...

    Breast Cancer May Spread Faster at Night

    When breast cancer patients sleep, tumor cells may "awaken" and spread through the bloodstream, a surprising study out of Switzerland reveals.

    Circulating cancer cells that later form new growths (metastases) do not arise continuously as previously assumed, according to researchers at ETH Zurich, the University Hospital Basel and the University of Basel.

    "When the affected person is...

    Plant-Based Diet May Help Keep Breast Cancer Away

    Women who follow a healthy plant-based diet after menopause appear to face a substantially lower risk for breast cancer, new French research indicates.

    After tracking more than 65,000 women for two decades, investigators found those who consumed a healthy, primarily plant-based diet saw their risk for developing any type of breast cancer drop by an average of 14%.

    But the accent is...

    Diabetes May Mean Worse Long-Term Outcomes for Breast Cancer Survivors

    Breast cancer is tough to beat, but if you also have diabetes and poor blood sugar control your long-term risk of death rises, researchers report.

    Their study included 488 women with metastatic breast cancer, which is cancer that has spread to other organs. Overall survival rates five year...

    Weight-Loss Surgery May Greatly Lower Odds for Many Cancers

    Dropping a load of pounds through weight-loss surgery can significantly decrease your risk of developing or dying from cancer, according to three new studies.

    Obese folks who underwent bariatric surgery were at least two times less likely to develop certain types of cancer and more than three times less likely to die of cancer than heavy people who didn't get the procedure, according to a...

    Some Younger Women With Early-Stage Breast Cancers Might Skip Radiation

    Tens of thousands of breast cancer patients could safely go without radiation therapy after their tumor has been removed, a new study argues.

    Gene testing helped doctors identify a group of women who skipped radiation therapy because their cancer showed very low...

    New Treatments Battle Advanced Breast Cancers

    Two "smart bomb" drugs are offering new hope to women with aggressive breast cancers, a pair of clinical trials show.

    Both medications are antibody-drug conjugates, consisting of a chemo drug that's been wedded to an antibody that delivers the chemotherapy directly to ca...

    Pandemic Caused Millions of U.S. Women to Skip Cancer Screenings

    Millions of U.S. women missed breast, cervical and colon cancer screenings due to the COVID-19 pandemic, according to a new study.

    It found that compared to 2018, the number of women in 2020 who said they had breast cancer screening in the past year fell by 2.13 million (6%). The number of women who ...

    Obesity Stigma Keeps Many From Life-Saving Cancer Screening: Study

    Many people who are overweight or obese avoid cancer screening for fear of stigma and judgment about their weight, British researchers report.

    In a review of 10 published studies, researchers found that many doctors around the world don't look kindly on patients with obesity, an attitude that can affect tre...

    Among Minority Women, Low Vitamin D May Raise Breast Cancer Risk

    Insufficient vitamin D may play a role in breast cancer, especially among minority women, new research indicates.

    Black and Hispanic American women with low vitamin D levels have a higher risk of breast cancer than those with sufficient vitamin D levels, researchers found.

    The findings sugge...

    Lumpectomy as Effective as Mastectomy for Young Women With Breast Cancer

    Breast cancers that arise before age 40 tend to be more aggressive. But young women who undergo "breast-conserving" surgery are just as likely to survive as those who have a mastectomy, a preliminary study finds.

    The study involved nearly 600 women under age 40 who were treated for breast cancer at one medical center....

    Half of Women Will Get False-Positive Mammogram Over 10 Years of Screening

    Fully half of all women who have annual mammograms to screen for breast cancer will receive a false-positive test result over a decade of screening, according to a new study.

    False-positive results call for further testing and eventually rule out cancer. False alarms can certainly increase anxiety.

    "Women undergoing screening mammography should be aware that being recalled for addit...

    Missed Cancer Screenings During Pandemic Could Raise Death Rate for Years

    The early months of the COVID-19 pandemic kept millions of Americans away from routine cancer screenings. Now a new study finds that many U.S. screening programs were still not back to normal by 2021.

    The study, of more than 700 cancer facilities nationwide, found that in January 2021 - a year after COVID's emergence in the United States - most still had not recovered their pre-pandemic s...

    Mammograms Can Also Highlight Heart Risks: Study

    Your annual screening mammogram may do more than spot breast cancer early - it may give you a heads up on your heart disease risk, too.

    Digital breast X-rays can also detect a build-up of calcium in the arteries of your breasts, an early sign of heart disease. These white ...

    Lymphedema in Legs Strikes 1 in 3 Female Cancer Survivors

    After surviving cancer, many older women suffer severe leg swelling that interferes with everyday life, a new study finds.

    About one-third of older women develop this chronic condition - called lymphedema - after treatment for colon, uterine or ovarian cancer, according to the study.

    "...

    Cancer Patients May Be at Higher Odds for Rare Neurological Disorder

    People with cancer may be at increased risk for a rare neurological disorder called Guillain-Barré syndrome, new research has found.

    "Previous studies have suggested there may be a link between cancer and Guillain-Barré syndrome, but just how often people develop

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  • March 3, 2022
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  • Fewer Breast Cancers May Be 'Overdiagnosed' by Mammograms Than Thought

    Screening mammograms can lead to overdiagnosis of breast cancer, but a new study finds it happens less often than experts have thought.

    Researchers estimated that about 15% of breast cancers caught through routine mammography screening are overdiagnoses -- meaning the tumors would never have caused h...

    Getting Rid of Meat in Your Diet May Lower Cancer Risk

    People who go meat-free, or at least put limits on it, may have lower risks of some of the most common cancers, a new, large study suggests.

    British researchers stressed that their findings do not prove definitively that vegetarian/vegan diets cut people's cancer risks. In fact, there ...

    Why Is Cancer-Linked Benzene in So Many Personal Care Products?

    Dozens of different spray products -- deodorants, shampoos, sunscreens, athlete's foot treatments -- have been recalled in recent months due to contamination with the cancer-causing chemical benzene.

    Most recently, six Brut and Sure aerosol antiperspirants

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  • February 24, 2022
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  • Women at Higher Odds for Side Effects From Some Cancer Treatments

    Gender differences extend to cancer treatments, with women having a higher risk of severe side effects from certain treatments than men, a new study finds.

    Previous research concluded women tend to have more side effects from chemotherapy, and this new paper shows the same is true for

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  • February 15, 2022
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  • Immune-Based Therapy Shows Promise Against Advanced Breast Cancers

    An experimental therapy that harnesses the body's tumor-fighting immune cells may be effective for some women with advanced breast cancer, early research suggests.

    The findings come from an ongoing trial at the U.S. National Cancer Institute (NCI). It is testing a new approach to treating women whose brea...

    Biden Relaunches Cancer Moonshot Initiative

    President Joe Biden announced Wednesday that he is giving a new push to the cancer moonshot initiative that he first led during the Obama administration.

    In his announcement, Biden said the program would aim to boost prevention, screening and research with a target of reducing the cancer death rate by 50% over the ne...

    Could a Pap Test Help Detect Breast, Ovarian Cancers, Too?

    Pap tests have long been used to detect cervical cancer early, but preliminary research suggests that cervical cells collected during those tests could also be used to catch other cancers, including deadly ovarian tumors.

    Researchers found that by analyzing a particular molecular "signature" in cervical...

    Most Americans Don't Know Alcohol Can Raise Cancer Risk

    Most American adults don't know that alcohol boosts cancer risk, but a majority support steps to increase awareness of the link, a new nationwide survey shows.

    ""It is important that people are made fully aware of the potential harms of alcohol so that they may make informed decisions about alcohol consumption," said study author Kara Wiseman. She's an assistant professor of public health...

    Did Your Gene Screen Turn Up Dangerous DNA? Study Finds Real Risk Is Low

    Most gene variants that have been labeled "pathogenic" may make only a small difference in a person's risk of actually developing disease, a new study suggests.

    Scouring genetic data on more than 72,000 individuals,

    Progress on Lung Cancer Drives Overall Decline in U.S. Cancer Deaths

    A new report offers hope on the lung cancer front: Patients are being diagnosed at an earlier stage in their disease and living longer due to better access to care, higher screening rates and improved treatments.

    And that is driving overall cancer rates down, researchers discovered.

    Still, lung cancer remai...

    Many Cancer Patients Face Mounting Bills Despite Having Insurance

    Many insured cancer patients still experience serious money problems linked to their illness, new research affirms.

    For example, nearly 3 out of 4 insured patients with colon cancer have major financial hardship in the year after their diagnosis, which affects their social functioning and quality of life, according to

  • Steven Reinberg HealthDay Reporter
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  • January 4, 2022
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  • More Than 10 Million People Died of Cancer Worldwide in 2019

    Cancer remains a major killer, with 10 million deaths reported worldwide in 2019.

    More than 23 million new cases were documented globally in 2019, according to researchers at the University of Washington School of Medicine.

    By comparison, in 2010 there were 8.29 million cancer deaths worldwide and fewer than 19 million new cases. Deaths were nearly 21% higher in 2019 than 2010, and...

    Supplements: Many Cancer Patients Think They'll Help, But Experts Urge Caution

    Many cancer patients take dietary supplements in hopes of keeping their disease at bay, but British researchers say there's little evidence it will pay off.

    In fact, they add, supplements may not only be ineffective, but harmful as well.

    "We found 1 in 5 people who had been treated for cancer mistakenly thought that taking vitamins or other supplements would help reduce the ris...

    Drug Combo May Fight a Tough Form of Breast Cancer

    An experimental drug, added to chemotherapy, may benefit women with an aggressive form of breast cancer, suggests an early study offering much-needed good news.

    The study involved women with "triple-negative" breast cancer, which accounts for about 15% to 20% of breast cancers among U.S. women. It is so called because the cancers lack receptors for the hormones estrogen and progesterone, ...

    New Hormonal Pill May Boost Outcomes for Older Breast Cancer Patients

    An experimental hormone therapy pill can effectively stall the progression of breast cancer, even in older patients whose tumors have mutated to make such therapy less effective, new trial results show.

    The drug elacestrant reduced the risk of breast cancer progression and death by 30% in postmenopausal patients whose cancers were fueled by the female hormone estrogen, compared to people ...

    Black Women Have Triple the Odds for Lymphedema After Breast Cancer Surgery

    A condition called lymphedema is a well-known side effect of breast cancer treatment that can lead to swelling in the arms and legs.

    New research suggests that Black women experience are at more than three times the risk of this painful issue compared to white women.

    "Lymphedema worsens quality of life for breast cancer patients," said the study's lead author, Dr. Andrea Barrio. S...

    Gene Test Spots Breast Cancer Patients Who Can Skip Post-Op Chemo

    A genetic test can identify older breast cancer patients who can forgo chemotherapy after surgery, even if the cancer has spread to nearby lymph nodes, a large international clinical trial shows.

    "For decades, women with breast cancer that had spread to the axillary [armpit] lymph nodes were treated with chemotherapy after surgery, to reduce the risk of recurrence," explained Dr. Francisc...

    Clinical Trials Are Becoming More Diverse, But There's Still Work To Do

    U.S. cancer clinical trial participants have become more diverse in makeup, but certain groups remain underrepresented, a new study finds.

    It's important to have a wide range of participants in clinical trials, to find out if treatments are safe and effective for people with different characteristics, according to the National Cancer Institute (NCI), which has a number of initiatives to b...

    Breast Cancer Diagnosis Linked to Higher Odds for Dangerous A-Fib

    Women with breast cancer are known to have heart problems related to treatment, and now a new study shows their odds of developing an abnormal heart rhythm known as atrial fibrillation (a-fib) may increase in the wake of a breast cancer diagnosis.

    Women who develop a-fib within a month of a breast cancer diagnosis are more likely to die from heart- or blood vessel-related problems within ...

    Drug Used to Prevent Miscarriage May Raise Lifetime Cancer Risk in Offspring

    People who were exposed to a particular hormonal medication in the womb may have a heightened risk of cancer later in life, a new study suggests.

    Researchers found the increased cancer risk among adults whose mothers had been given injections of a synthetic progesterone known as 17-OHPC, or 17P, during pregnancy. The study participants were born in the 1960s, when the drug was used to hel...

    Exercise Helps Ease Arm, Shoulder Pain After Breast Cancer Surgery

    Arm and shoulder pain are common for women after breast cancer surgery, and beginning a supervised exercise program soon afterwards can go a long way to easing the discomfort, new research suggests.

    As the team of British investigators explained, restricted shoulder movement and chronic pain or swelling in the armpit area can really impact a patient's recovery and quality of life.

    ...

    Will an Early-Stage Breast Cancer Spread? New Analysis Offers Some Answers

    It's a life-and-death prediction: How likely is early-stage breast cancer to spread throughout the rest of a patient's body?

    A new analysis that tried to make that call easier for doctors to predict found that a younger age at diagnosis was a strong indicator of spreading ("metastatic") cancer.

    To come to that conclusion, the researchers analyzed data from tens of thousands of women...

    Targeted High-Dose Radiation Helps Fight Advanced Lung Cancer

    High-dose radiation therapy may stall tumor growth in patients with advanced lung cancer who are not fully responding to drug therapies, a preliminary study suggests.

    The study involved patients whose lung cancer was considered "oligoprogressive." That means the cancer had spread to other sites in the body, and the patients were having a mixed response to standard systemic treatments -- i...

    Cancer Costs U.S. Patients $21 Billion a Year

    American cancer patients spent more than $21 billion on their care in 2019, a new report shows.

    That $21.09 billion included out-of-pocket costs of $16.22 billion and patient time costs of $4.87 billion. Patient time costs are the value of the time patients spend traveling for, waiting for and receiving care.

    "As the costs of cancer treatment continue to rise, greater attention to a...

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