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Prostate Cancer Treatment May Raise Heart Risks

WEDNESDAY, July 27, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- Hormone therapy is a common treatment option for prostate cancer, but it may increase the risk of death from heart disease, especially in older men, a new study finds.

Dr. William Dahut, a prostate cancer researcher and chief scientific officer for the American Cancer Society, said the study from Lithuania provides more evide...

Think You're at High Risk of Prostate Cancer? Healthy Living Can Slash Odds for Lethal Disease

Genes can put some men at heightened risk of prostate cancer, but a new study suggests they can undo much of that potential harm with a healthy lifestyle.

Researchers found that among men at increased genetic risk of prostate cancer, those who maintained a healthy lifestyle were much less likely to die of the disease over...

Could Milk Raise a Man's Odds for Prostate Cancer?

Men who drink lots of milk may be more likely to develop prostate cancer than men who don't, new research finds.

When compared to men who consumed just 1 or 2 teaspoons of milk every day, men who drank about 1¾ cups of milk daily were about 27% more likely to develop prostate cancer, a new study showed.

What's more, they had about a 60% increased risk for developing prostate cance...

Prostate Cancer May Raise Risk for Blood Clots

Doctors need to be aware that prostate cancer raises a man's risk of serious and potentially deadly blood clots by about 50%, researchers say.

All cancer patients are at increased risk for venous thromboembolism (VTE), a dangerous but treatable blood clot in the veins that is a leading cause of death in cancer patient...

Obesity Raises a Man's Odds for Fatal Prostate Cancer

Men with widening waistlines may be more likely to die from prostate cancer.

Specifically, a man's risk of dying from prostate cancer increases 7% for every 4-inch increase in belly fat, new research suggests.

"Our findings should encourage men to maintain a healthy weight," said ...

Black Patients Less Likely to Get High-Tech Prostate Cancer Therapy

Use of a high-tech radiation cancer treatment called proton beam therapy (PBT) has increased overall in the United States, but Black patients are getting it less often than white patients, two ne...

Scientists Pinpoint Five Bacteria Linked to Aggressive Prostate Cancer

Researchers have identified five types of bacteria associated with aggressive prostate cancer, and they say their findings could lead to new treatments for the disease.

The five types of bacteria were common in urine and tissue samples from men with aggressive prostate cancer, according to the team at the University of East Anglia (UEA) in the United Kingdom.

All of the bacteria ar...

As Use of PSA Test Fell, Rate of Advanced Prostate Cancers Rose

Ever since routine prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening tests have no longer been recommended, there has been a troubling rise in advanced prostate cancer cases in the United States, new research has found.

The tests measure the amount of PSA in the blood, and elevated levels can signal the presence of pros...

No Sign Common Steroid Spironolactone Can Cause Cancer: Study

The often-used steroid spironolactone is not linked to any increased risk of a range of common cancers, according to a new study.

The synthetic steroid is routinely used to manage heart failure, high blood pressure and edema, and also used off-label to treat acne, hair loss and excessive hair growth (hirsutism).

"Though the

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  • March 10, 2022
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  • VA Study Shows Black Men Twice as Likely to Develop Prostate Cancer as Whites

    Even in a setting where white and Black people have equal access to medical care, Black Americans fare worse than whites in terms of prostate cancer, new research shows.

    A review of nearly 8 million men seen at America's Veterans Affairs (VA) hospitals found that Black veterans had nearly twice the incidence of localized and advanced

  • Steven Reinberg HealthDay Reporter
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  • January 19, 2022
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  • Newer Hormone Treatments for Prostate Cancer May Raise Risk of Depression

    TUESDAY, Jan. 18, 2022 (HealthDay Now) -- Advanced forms of hormone therapy are very effective at keeping prostate cancer in check, but they also can double a man's risk of falling into depression, researchers have found.

    Prostate cancer patients treated with the latest forms of hormone blockers were twice as likely to develop depression compared with men treated with older forms of hormo...

    Progress on Lung Cancer Drives Overall Decline in U.S. Cancer Deaths

    A new report offers hope on the lung cancer front: Patients are being diagnosed at an earlier stage in their disease and living longer due to better access to care, higher screening rates and improved treatments.

    And that is driving overall cancer rates down, researchers discovered.

    Still, lung cancer remai...

    Many Cancer Patients Face Mounting Bills Despite Having Insurance

    Many insured cancer patients still experience serious money problems linked to their illness, new research affirms.

    For example, nearly 3 out of 4 insured patients with colon cancer have major financial hardship in the year after their diagnosis, which affects their social functioning and quality of life, according to

  • Steven Reinberg HealthDay Reporter
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  • January 4, 2022
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  • Black Men Get Better Outcomes From Radiation Rx for Prostate Cancer

    A new analysis uncovers a racial paradox in prostate cancer care: While Black men are often diagnosed later and with more aggressive disease than white men, radiation therapy seems to work better for them than for their white peers.

    To come to that conclusion, researchers reviewed seven trials comprising more than 8,800 men with

  • Denise Mann HealthDay Reporter
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  • January 3, 2022
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  • Supplements: Many Cancer Patients Think They'll Help, But Experts Urge Caution

    Many cancer patients take dietary supplements in hopes of keeping their disease at bay, but British researchers say there's little evidence it will pay off.

    In fact, they add, supplements may not only be ineffective, but harmful as well.

    "We found 1 in 5 people who had been treated for cancer mistakenly thought that taking vitamins or other supplements would help reduce the ris...

    More Evidence That Pandemic Delayed Cancer Diagnoses

    New research offers fresh proof that the COVID-19 pandemic delayed cancer diagnoses in the United States, increasing patients' risk for poor outcomes.

    For the study, researchers analyzed data from more than 9 million patients at over 1,200 Veterans Affairs (VA) medical facilities.

    Procedures to diagnose cancer were used less often and there were fewer new cancer diagnoses in 2020 t...

    Clinical Trials Are Becoming More Diverse, But There's Still Work To Do

    U.S. cancer clinical trial participants have become more diverse in makeup, but certain groups remain underrepresented, a new study finds.

    It's important to have a wide range of participants in clinical trials, to find out if treatments are safe and effective for people with different characteristics, according to the National Cancer Institute (NCI), which has a number of initiatives to b...

    Drug Used to Prevent Miscarriage May Raise Lifetime Cancer Risk in Offspring

    People who were exposed to a particular hormonal medication in the womb may have a heightened risk of cancer later in life, a new study suggests.

    Researchers found the increased cancer risk among adults whose mothers had been given injections of a synthetic progesterone known as 17-OHPC, or 17P, during pregnancy. The study participants were born in the 1960s, when the drug was used to hel...

    Black Men Less Likely to Get Follow-Up MRI When Test Suggests Prostate Cancer

    Black, Hispanic and Asian men in the United States are less likely than white men to receive a follow-up MRI after a screening suggests prostate cancer, a new study finds.

    "We can't say definitively if the reason Black, Hispanic, and Asian men did not receive this particular test is that physicians did not refer them for it, or if the patients opted themselves out of further testing," sai...

    Urine Test May Spot Aggressive Prostate Cancer

    A urine test might one day be able to tell which prostate cancer patients need immediate treatment and which don't, British researchers report.

    "Prostate cancer can be divided into low and high risk -- the low-risk men rarely require treatment, and the high-risk certainly do," said study author Jeremy Clark, a senior research associate at Norwich Medical School at the University of E...

    Shorter Course of Post-Op Radiation May Work Well for Prostate Cancer Patients

    After prostate cancer surgery, men can safely undergo fewer radiation treatments at higher doses, a new clinical trial shows.

    Researchers found that the shorter regimen -- given over five weeks, instead of seven -- did not raise patients' odds of lasting side effects.

    Safety has been a "major concern" because when patients have fewer radiation treatments, the daily dose needs to be ...

    Cancer Costs U.S. Patients $21 Billion a Year

    American cancer patients spent more than $21 billion on their care in 2019, a new report shows.

    That $21.09 billion included out-of-pocket costs of $16.22 billion and patient time costs of $4.87 billion. Patient time costs are the value of the time patients spend traveling for, waiting for and receiving care.

    "As the costs of cancer treatment continue to rise, greater attention to a...

    Cancer Care Costs U.S. $156 Billion Per Year; Drugs a Major Factor

    Private insurers paid out about $156.2 billion in 2018 for U.S. patients with the 15 most common cancers.

    Medication was the largest expense and drugs for breast, lung, lymphoma and colon cancers accounted for the largest chunk of those costs, according to a Penn State College of Medicine study.

    "The public often hears that the U.S. spends an inordinate amount of money on health car...

    New Tests for Colon, Prostate Cancer Show Promise

    A pair of experimental tests could help doctors detect colon or prostate cancer with just a sample of blood or saliva.

    One test examines a person's blood for four biomarkers linked to inflammation. In a small study, it outperformed the fecal blood test now used in colon cancer screening, said lead researcher Dr. Mona Eldeeb, of Alexandria University Medical Research Institute in Egypt.

    9/11 First Responders Face Higher Cancer Risk 20 Years Later

    Twenty years on, responders to the World Trade Center attacks in New York City are showing increased risks of certain cancers, two new studies confirm.

    Researchers found higher-than-average rates of prostate cancer among firefighters, medics and other workers who toiled at the disaster site on and after Sept. 11, 2001.

    And compared with firefighters from other major U.S. cities...

    Enlarged Prostate Doesn't Raise a Man's Odds for Cancer: Study

    Does having an enlarged prostate doom you to prostate cancer?

    Far from it, a new study suggests.

    Also called benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), the condition may actually provide some protection for men from developing prostate cancer, researchers report.

    "Men are often anxious about prostate cancer, as it is the second most common cancer in men, with some worrying BPH increa...

    Death of Spouse Could Raise Men's Odds for Prostate Cancer

    Widowers have a higher risk for advanced prostate cancer than men who are part of a couple, Canadian researchers say.

    The new findings are from an analysis of 12 studies comparing 14,000 men newly diagnosed with prostate cancer and 12,000 healthy men.

    The study -- recently published in the European Journal of Epidemiology -- suggests that social environment is an important ...

    Fatigue Before Treatment Starts Might Affect Cancer Survival

    Significant fatigue at the start of cancer treatment is associated with a greater risk of severe side effects and shorter survival, a new study finds.

    Researchers analyzed data from four clinical trials of lung cancer or prostate cancer treatments that were conducted by the SWOG Cancer Research Network, a cancer clinical trials group funded by the U.S. National Cancer Institute.

    The...

    Bogus Info on Cancer Common Online, and It Can Harm

    Don't believe everything you read on social media about cancer and cancer treatment.

    A new study finds that one-third of the most popular articles on social media about treatment for common cancers contains misinformation -- and most of it can be downright dangerous.

    "The worst-case scenario is when it leads to a person declining proven cancer treatments in favor of a treatment tha...

    Many Black Men Missed Out on Prostate Cancer Care During Pandemic

    Black men in the United States have higher rates of prostate cancer than white men, yet they were far less likely to have surgery for their cancer during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic, a new study finds.

    Researchers analyzed data from a Pennsylvania urologic database to compare prostate removal (prostatectomy) rates among Black and white patients who had untreated prostate cance...

    Obese Men May Have Better Survival With Advanced Prostate Cancer

    When men have advanced prostate cancer, obesity might offer something of a survival advantage, a preliminary study suggests.

    Researchers in Italy found that among men with prostate cancer that had spread throughout the body, those who were obese were less likely to die over the next few years.

    Roughly 30% were still alive after three years, versus 20% of normal-weight and overweight...

    Adding MRI to Screening Can Cut Prostate Cancer Overdiagnosis in Half

    One of the big issues in prostate cancer care is overdiagnosis -- men who are treated for low-risk, slow-growing tumors that might be better left monitored and untreated.

    Now, research out of Sweden suggests that having patients undergo MRI screening, along with targeted biopsies, could reduce the number of prostate cancer overdiagnoses by half.

    The new approach can detect just as...

    Black Men Less Likely to Get Best Prostate Cancer Treatments

    Black American military veterans with aggressive prostate cancer who would benefit from surgery or radiation are less likely to get those treatments than men of other races, despite equal access to health care, a new study finds.

    "Despite great strides in prostate cancer care over the past few decades, racial disparities in care persist, and there remains a lot to be done to better unders...

    Could a DNA Blood Test Spot a Range of Hidden Cancers?

    Could a new one-and-done blood test designed to detect as many as 50 different types of cancer become a diagnostic game changer?

    Yes, say researchers, who report the method appears accurate and reliable at identifying and locating cancer, including some kinds for which there are now no effective screening methods.

    "[The test] sets the stage for a new paradigm of screening individual...

    Targeted Radiotherapy Might Help Men Battling Advanced Prostate Cancer

    Patients with advanced prostate cancers may have newfound hope: Researchers identified a new potential treatment for men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer, which has no cure.

    Metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer means the disease continues to spread despite therapies that deplete male hormones (androgens) such as testosterone, which are thought to "feed" tum...

    Americans Missed Almost 10 Million Cancer Screenings During Pandemic

    Nearly 10 million cancer screenings have been missed in the United States during the coronavirus pandemic, researchers report.

    The investigators analyzed data on three types of cancer for which early screenings are most beneficial -- breast, colon and prostate -- and found that 9.4 million screenings for these cancers did not occur in the United States due to COVID-19.

    Screenings fo...

    Closely Monitor Heart Health in Cancer Patients Who Get Hormonal Therapies: AHA

    If hormones are part of your treatment for breast or prostate cancer, your heart health should be closely monitored, according to a new American Heart Association scientific statement.

    Hormonal therapies for breast and prostate cancer increase the risk of heart attack and stroke, the authors noted. This increased risk is greater in patients who already have two or more heart risk factors...

    Healthy Living Helps Ward Off Deadly Prostate Cancers in Men at High Risk

    A nutritious diet, regular exercise and other components of a healthy lifestyle may reduce the odds of lethal prostate cancer in men with a high genetic risk for it, researchers report.

    "The excess genetic risk of lethal prostate cancer could be offset by adhering to a healthy lifestyle," concluded co-lead author Anna Plym. She's a postdoctoral research fellow at Brigham and Women's Hospi...

    Why So Many New Cancer Diagnoses When Americans Turn 65?

    A few years ago, Dr. Joseph Shrager, a professor of cardiothoracic surgery at Stanford University School of Medicine, noticed that lung cancer diagnoses were noticeably higher at age 65 than at slightly older or younger ages.

    "There was no reason rates should differ much between the ages of 63 and 65," Shrager said.

    He discussed this with his colleagues, who said they were seeing so...

    Obesity Tied to Shorter Survival in Cancer Patients

    Obesity may shorten the lives of patients with certain types of cancers, but not others, a new research review concludes.

    The analysis, of more than 200 studies, found that across numerous cancers, obesity was linked to shorter survival. The list included breast, colon, prostate, uterine and pancreatic cancers.

    On the other hand, patients with lung, kidney or melanoma skin cancer al...

    Drug Used to Prevent Miscarriages May Be Upping Cancer Rates Decades Later

    Kids born to moms who took a drug widely used to prevent miscarriages in the 1950s and 1960s may be twice as likely to develop cancer in adulthood.

    The drug in question, hydroxyprogesterone caproate, also known as OHPC or 17-OHPC, is a man-made version of the hormone progesterone. It is no longer used to reduce the chances of miscarriage, but it's still prescribed to prevent preterm birth...

    Insight Into Why a Prostate Cancer Therapy Works Better for Black Men

    Higher levels of a certain type of immune cell may explain why immunotherapy for prostate cancer is more effective in Black men than in white men, researchers say.

    The finding could lead to immunotherapy-based precision treatment for localized aggressive and advanced prostate cancer in all races.

    For the study, the researchers analyzed 1,300 prostate tumor samples and found that, on...

    Could a Common Prostate Drug Help Prevent Parkinson's?

    While scientists still don't know what causes Parkinson's disease, new research shows an association between a drug that some men take for an enlarged prostate condition and a reduced risk of developing the illness.

    A team led by scientists at the University of Iowa, working in collaboration with researchers in Denmark and China, found that the drug terazosin and similar medications may h...

    Breast Cancer Surpasses Lung Cancer as Leading Cancer Diagnosis Worldwide

    Breast cancer has surpassed lung cancer as the world's most commonly diagnosed cancer.

    In 2020, there were an estimated 19.3 million new cancer cases and nearly 10 million cancer deaths worldwide, according to the Global Cancer Statistics 2020 report from the American Cancer Society (ACS) and the International Agency for Research on Cancer.

    Overall, 1 in 5 people get cancer during t...

    Men, Make Health Your Goal This Year

    The new year is the ideal time to focus on your health and one expert has some tips, especially for men, for doing that.

    According to Dr. Kevin McVary, director of Loyola Medicine Men's Health Center, in Maywood, Ill., "Men don't always focus on their health and, in fact, men are less likely to see a doctor or utilize health resources, and wait longer than women to seek care. Often, it's ...

    Fewer U.S. Cancer Patients Are Dying From Suicide, Study Finds

    New research reveals an encouraging trend: Despite the rate of suicide rising overall for Americans, U.S. cancer patients are actually less likely now to take their own life than in the past.

    Researchers at the American Cancer Society (ACS) tracked national data on causes of death among Americans for the years 1999 through 2018. They found "a decreasing trend of cancer-related suicide du...

    Cancer Screening Fell Sharply Early in Pandemic, But Has Rebounded

    As clinics closed for non-essential care and patients' COVID-19 fears kept them from check-ups, the United States saw a steep drop in cancer screenings and diagnoses during the first peak of the pandemic, a new report finds.

    Researchers analyzed data on how many patients underwent cancer screening tests -- procedures such as mammograms, colonoscopies, Pap tests, PSA blood tests for prosta...

    U.S. Cancer Death Rates Keep Falling: Report

    Improved lung cancer treatment is a major reason for the 31% decline in cancer death rates in the United States between 1991 and 2018, including a record 2.4% decrease from 2017 to 2018, the American Cancer Society says.

    How the COVID-19 pandemic will affect this downward trend is unknown, the society noted.

    "The impact of COVID-19 on cancer diagnoses and outcomes at the population ...

    Coffee Might Help Ward Off Prostate Cancer

    A cup of java may not be a bad idea for men's health: Drinking lots of coffee may reduce their risk of prostate cancer, researchers report.

    The investigators analyzed data from 16 studies conducted around the world. Together, the studies involved more than a million men, about 58,000 of who went on to develop prostate cancer. The team was led by urologist Dr. Kefeng Wang, of China Medic...

    Mediterranean Diet Could Help Stop Prostate Cancer's Spread

    Food as medicine: New research suggests that a healthy Mediterranean diet might lower the risk of prostate cancer progressing to a more advanced state.

    The relative lack of saturated fat in these diets might be a major reason why.

    The Mediterranean diet is "known for its lower consumption of saturated fats," said Dr. Phillip Vigneri, a prostate cancer specialist unconnected to the n...