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Health News Results - 13

Black Men Get Better Outcomes From Radiation Rx for Prostate Cancer

A new analysis uncovers a racial paradox in prostate cancer care: While Black men are often diagnosed later and with more aggressive disease than white men, radiation therapy seems to work better for them than for their white peers.

To come to that conclusion, researchers reviewed seven trials comprising more than 8,800 men with

  • Denise Mann HealthDay Reporter
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  • January 3, 2022
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  • Full Page
  • Black Men Less Likely to Get Follow-Up MRI When Test Suggests Prostate Cancer

    Black, Hispanic and Asian men in the United States are less likely than white men to receive a follow-up MRI after a screening suggests prostate cancer, a new study finds.

    "We can't say definitively if the reason Black, Hispanic, and Asian men did not receive this particular test is that physicians did not refer them for it, or if the patients opted themselves out of further testing," sai...

    Urine Test May Spot Aggressive Prostate Cancer

    A urine test might one day be able to tell which prostate cancer patients need immediate treatment and which don't, British researchers report.

    "Prostate cancer can be divided into low and high risk -- the low-risk men rarely require treatment, and the high-risk certainly do," said study author Jeremy Clark, a senior research associate at Norwich Medical School at the University of E...

    Shorter Course of Post-Op Radiation May Work Well for Prostate Cancer Patients

    After prostate cancer surgery, men can safely undergo fewer radiation treatments at higher doses, a new clinical trial shows.

    Researchers found that the shorter regimen — given over five weeks, instead of seven — did not raise patients' odds of lasting side effects.

    Safety has been a "major concern" because when patients have fewer radiation treatments, the daily dose needs to b...

    Enlarged Prostate Doesn't Raise a Man's Odds for Cancer: Study

    Does having an enlarged prostate doom you to prostate cancer?

    Far from it, a new study suggests.

    Also called benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), the condition may actually provide some protection for men from developing prostate cancer, researchers report.

    "Men are often anxious about prostate cancer, as it is the second most common cancer in men, with some worrying BPH increa...

    Mediterranean Diet Could Help Stop Prostate Cancer's Spread

    Food as medicine: New research suggests that a healthy Mediterranean diet might lower the risk of prostate cancer progressing to a more advanced state.

    The relative lack of saturated fat in these diets might be a major reason why.

    The Mediterranean diet is "known for its lower consumption of saturated fats," said Dr. Phillip Vigneri, a prostate cancer specialist unconnected to the n...

    Radiation Rx for Prostate Cancer Can Cause Financial Pain: Study

    People diagnosed with cancer often have many concerns, including "financial toxicity," the hardship and stress associated with the cost of treatment.

    New research found that for men with early-stage prostate cancer, choices about initial treatments can be a source of stress. And the cost is a big reason why.

    "Cost of treatment and the associated financial burden could be an importan...

    'Hidden' Prostate Cancer on Biopsy Usually Means Good Outcome: Study

    Negative biopsies among early-stage prostate cancer patients who've chosen active surveillance are associated with a low risk of disease progression, but they aren't a sign that their cancer has completely vanished, a new study indicates.

    Active surveillance refers to close monitoring for signs of cancer progression -- what's often called "watchful waiting." Patients sometimes get regula...

    'Watchful Waiting' OK for Black Men With Prostate Cancer

    A 'watchful waiting' approach to care may be safe for Black Americans with low-risk prostate cancer, a new study suggests.

    Black patients are less likely than whites to be offered watchful waiting, also called active surveillance. This may be because compared to whites, Black men are more likely to have aggressive prostate cancer and 2.4 times more likely to die from the disease.

    Pr...

    More Prostate Cancers Are Being Diagnosed at a Later Stage

    While men can take solace in a new government report that shows prostate cancer cases have been declining overall in the past two decades, the same analysis finds that the opposite is true for advanced prostate cancer cases.

    In fact, the number of cases of cancer that had already spread from the prostate to other parts of the body doubled between 2003 and 2017, going from 4% to 8&...

    With PSA Test Out of Favor, Cases of Advanced Prostate Cancer Are Rising

    Prostate cancer screening guidelines have been evolving for more than a decade, but new research suggests that recommendations against routine prostate cancer testing may have come at a steep price -- more men getting diagnosed with advanced prostate cancers.

    The study found that rates of advanced prostate cancers rose by about 5% per year through 2016.

    There was some ...

    'Watchful Waiting' Less Likely for Black Prostate Cancer Patients

    "Watchful waiting" is on the rise overall among U.S. men with low-risk prostate cancer, but black men remain less likely to opt for it, a new study finds.

    For the study, researchers examined 2010-2015 data on more than 50,000 low-risk prostate cancer patients in the United States. The investigators found that black men were 16% less likely than other men to decide on watchful wai...

    Use of Meds for Enlarged Prostate Might Delay a Cancer Diagnosis

    Men who take medicines for an enlarged prostate can have years-long delays in their diagnosis of prostate cancer and more advanced prostate cancer when they're diagnosed, a new study finds.

    The reason? Drugs in this class -- such as Proscar (finasteride) and Avodart (dutasteride) -- can drive down blood levels of prostate-specific antigen (PSA). That's the blood marker doctors period...