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MRI Might Boost Cancer Detection for Women With Dense Breasts

Nearly half of women have dense breast tissue, which can be a double whammy on their odds for breast cancer.

Not only are dense breasts a risk factor for cancer, but this glandular and fibrous connective tissue make it harder to detect cancers on a mammogram, the usual method for breast cancer screening.

New r...

Understanding Your Cholesterol Numbers

You might not think about your cholesterol very often, if ever, but it’s important to know your numbers.

It’s even helpful to get it checked at a young age, according to one heart expert.

“People in their 20s may never consider getting their cholesterol checked, but they should because it may uncover a genetic predisposition to high cholesterol that they didn’t know about,...

When Schools Ask Students About Suicide, Those At Risk Get Help Sooner

Could asking teens a simple, but pointed, question about their mental health reveal whether they are at risk for suicide?

It might, new research suggests.

Since suicide is now the second leading cause of death among American teens, any strategy that could lower that risk may be worth trying.

...

Childhood Autism Diagnosis Is Getting Better, But Not for Everyone

Autism cases are surging in the New York-New Jersey metro area, mainly fueled by the diagnosis of autistic children who don’t have intellectual disabilities, a new study reports.

The percentage of kids identified with autism spectrum disorder rose from about 1% in 2000 to 3% in 2016 in that region, said lead researcher

Only Half of Folks With Stool Test Positive for Colon Cancer Get Follow-Up Colonoscopy

Many people undergo a stool test to screen for colon cancer but a new study finds too few follow up with a colonoscopy when that test warns of a possible cancer.

Not following up undermines the point of screening, said study-co-author Jeff Mohl, director of research and analytics for the Amer...

Quick Scan Spots a Common Hormonal Form of High Blood Pressure

For people with a specific type of high blood pressure, British researchers led a new study on a particular CT scan that may enable a cure.

In about 5% to 10% of high blood pressure cases, the source is a gene mutation in the adrenal glands, according to earlier research. Tiny benign nodules in the glands lead to excessive production of the steroid hormone aldosterone, which causes salt t...

Many Women Over 65 Are Dying of Cervical Cancer. What Needs to Change?

A new study shows that many women diagnosed with and dying from cervical cancer are older than 65 -- a group for whom routine screening is usually not recommended.

Cervical cancer screening has been credited with a sharp drop in deaths from the disease in the decades since it was introduced in the United States. But current guidelines state that once a woman reaches 65, if she has been re...

For Seniors, Declining Sense of Smell Could Signal Frailty

Doctors already test seniors’ hearing and vision. Sense of smell could be added to screenings one day, according to researchers who found links between its loss and risk of frailty in older adults.

“We use our sense of smell to identify the threat of a fire or to enjoy the fragrance of flowers on a spring day. But just like vision and hearing, this sense weakens as we age,” said stu...

DNA Fragments in Blood Promise Cheap, Easy Test for Cancer

Researchers are reporting progress on a blood test that can detect multiple cancers in a relatively simpler, and potentially less pricey, way than other tests under development.

The test picks up certain cancer signals in the blood using a fairly straightforward method: counting bits of DNA that appear to be "broken" in unexpected places.

In the new study, scientists found that the ...

New Year: Time for Your Memory Screening Appointment

Many conditions cause memory issues, and early detection is essential for effective treatment, according to a national Alzheimer’s disease organization.

The Alzheimer’s Foundation of America (AFA) encourages people to get a memory screening in the new year.

The foundation offers free, confidential virtual memory screenings. It doesn’t set a minimum age and there are no insura...

Blood Test Might Warn of Dangerous Complication of Pregnancy

An experimental blood test could one day provide early warning for a life-threatening complication of pregnancy, a new study reports.

Placenta accreta occurs when the placenta — the food and oxygen source for a fetus — grows too deeply into the wall of a woman’s uterus.

The condition can cause a woman to bleed to death following delivery, especially if it hasn’t been detecte...

Only 1 in 7 Cancers Are Caught Through Cancer Screenings

Just 14% of all cancers diagnosed in the United States are detected through routine screening, a new analysis finds -- pointing to many missed opportunities to catch cancer early.

"It's surprising, but true," said Caroline ...

Women's Depression Symptoms May  Differ by Race: Study

Depression can be tricky to detect in some people, and Black women may exhibit different symptoms, leading to missed care, researchers say.

Black women report sleep disturbances, self-criticism and irritability more often than the stereotypical low mood, according to a new study.

As a result, standard screening tools may underdiagnose depression in Black women, the study authors sai...

Stop Screening Asymptomatic Hospital Patients for COVID, Experts Say

A nationwide group of infection control experts recommends U.S. health care facilities stop testing patients for COVID-19 before hospital admission or scheduled surgeries if they have no virus symptoms.

The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA) statement says facilities should rely instead on enhanced layers of infection prevention.

“The small benefits that could c...

Many U.S. Women Must Travel Far to Get Mammograms

Many American women have to travel long distances to reach the nearest mammography center, a new study finds -- raising questions about whether that keeps some from receiving breast cancer screening.

Researchers found that 8.2 million women had limited access to mammography screening in 2022 -- defined as living more than a 20-minute drive to the nearest facility. That was up from 7.5 mil...

CT Screenings Can Dramatically Improve Lung Cancer Outcomes

Annual lung cancer screening for heavy smokers can provide a big boost in lung cancer survival over the long term, a new study shows.

When low-dose CT screening identifies early-stage lung cancer, patients have an 80% chance of surviving 20 years, researchers found. And for some, the odds are as high as 100%.

But only 16% of lung cancers are caught early, and more than half of...

Anyone Can Get Lung Cancer. Detecting It Early Is Crucial

Too few people are getting screened for lung cancer.

This is the message from the American Lung Association's 2022 "State of Lung Cancer" report. Less than 6% of eligible Americans have been screened for lung cancer, and in some states, lung cancer screening rates are as...

Doctor's Office Stress Test Could Gauge Your Heart Risk

Evaluating a person's psychological stress can be a good way to gauge their risk of heart and blood vessel disease, new research suggests.

And a brief questionnaire could help with the assessment, the study findings showed.

“Our study is part of the accumulating evidence that psychological distress is a really important factor in a cardiovascular diagnosis, such as the other healt...

How the Pandemic Affected Americans' Blood Pressure

Although blood pressure levels among Americans rose during the COVID-19 pandemic, new research suggests things could have been far worse.

"We expected blood pressure control to be worse due to decreased physical activity, stress, poor sleep and other cardiovascular disease risk factors that worsened during the pandemic," said study leader

  • Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • November 3, 2022
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  • Top Medical Groups, Hospitals Urge Better Access to Lung Cancer Screening

    Screening tests routinely catch cases of breast and colon cancer early, but a screening test for lung cancer is sorely underused in high-risk people and that needs to change, more than 50 cancer organizations said in a joint statement issued Tuesday.

    What prompted the move? Low-dose CT screening is recommended for people who are more likely to develop lung cancer, yet only 5....

    Did the Decline in PSA Testing Lead to More Cases of Advanced Prostate Cancer?

    A large new study of U.S. veterans suggests that when prostate cancer screening rates go down, the number of men diagnosed with advanced cancer then rises.

    Researchers found that across 128 U.S. veterans health centers, the rate of PSA screening for prostate cancer declined between 2008 and 201...

    Not Just for Glasses: Eye Exams Could Save Your Life

    Eyes may be your window to good health.

    Patient Barbara Krupar, a 65-year-old Ohio retiree, learned this firsthand.

    Krupar made an appointment with her ophthalmologist after experiencing disturbing vision changes.

    Dr. Nicole Bajic detected possible early warning signs of a stroke. She advised Krupar to go to the emergency room immediately to have her head and neck imaged.

    <...

    As Clinics Providing Abortions Closed in Iowa, STD Rates Started Rising

    Even before the U.S. Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade last summer, many states had already moved to limit abortion access by defunding family planning health centers.

    Unfortunately, these very same clinics offer a broad range of essential primary care services beyond abortion, including access t...

    Screen Kids 8 and Older for Anxiety, Expert Panel Recommends

    Children aged 8 and up should be screened for anxiety, the influential U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommended on Tuesday. Kids aged 12 and up should also be screened for

  • By Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • October 12, 2022
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  • New Test of Pancreatic Cysts Might Boost Cancer Detection

    Pancreatic cancer is often fatal, but a molecular test that can accurately distinguish benign cysts from those that could become cancerous may be a key to saving lives.

    Researchers tested the technology — called PancreaSeq — to see if it could work in a clinical setting and found success.

    “Based on the results of this study, molecular testing of pancreatic cysts is poised to e...

    1 in 5 Young Women Has No Plans to Get a Mammogram

    Terlisa Sheppard knows the value of tracking changes in her body.

    The Orlando Health patient was eight and a half months pregnant and just 31 years old when she felt a lump under her arm. She left work to get it checked out and "didn't return back to work because that is the evening that I found out I had breast cancer," Sheppard said.

    Now, 23 years later -- and long after deliveri...

    Not Enough Older Americans Are Checking Blood Pressure At Home

    Regular home monitoring can help with blood pressure control, but only half of people who have hypertension or other related conditions actually do it, a new study found.

    Of Americans ages 50 to 80 who take blood pressure me...

    Too Few Kids With Sickle Cell Anemia Get Screened for Stroke Risk

    Too few children with sickle cell anemia are getting the recommended screening tests for stroke, a common complication of this disease, a new government report finds.

    What's more, many aren't receiving

  • By Denise Mann HealthDay Reporter
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  • September 21, 2022
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  • Task Force Recommends Anxiety Screening for All Adults Under 65

    In what amounts to a public acknowledgement that anxiety disorders have run rampant during the pandemic, an influential expert panel is recommending for the first time that all Amer...

    COVID Home Test Kits Less Effective With Omicron Variant: Study

    Rapid at-home COVID tests have become less reliable with the emergence of the Omicron variant, new research suggests.

    Only one of three widely used rapid antigen tests met World Health Organization (WHO) standards for accuracy, Dutch researchers report.

    For the study -- published Sept. 14 in The BMJ

    Blood Test Shows Promise at Catching Cancers Early

    A single blood test that can screen for more than 50 cancers seems to work fairly well in the real world, a preliminary study reveals.

    Researchers found that of over 6,600 apparently healthy people aged 50 and older, the blood test detected a possible cancer "signal" in roughly 1%. When those individuals had more extensive testing, cancer was confirmed in 38%.

    Experts called

    CT Lung Cancer Screening Catches More Tumors Early

    Lung cancer CT screening scans can catch tumors at an earlier and more treatable stage, a new study indicates.

    The number of stage 1 lung cancers detected by doctors increased 8.4% after low-dose CT screening scans were implemented across four different health care sy...

    Blood Test Shows Promise for Quick Diagnosis of ALS

    Patients suspected of having amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) may soon be able to get a diagnosis much more quickly, not wasting the precious time many have left, new research suggests.

    In 20...

    There's More MS in Northern Countries. Now, Researchers Find New Reason Why

    Vitamin D exposure, or lack of it, has long been thought to influence the risk of developing multiple sclerosis (MS) because the disease is diagnosed more often in people in northern countries.

    However, new research suggests there might be an additional reas...

    Cheap, Same-Day Test Could Help Spot Miscarriage Risk

    A new and inexpensive same-day test could help pregnant women learn if their developing fetus has genetic problems that increase their risk of miscarriage.

    The Short-read Transpore Rapid Karyotyping (STORK) test can detect extra or missing chromosomes using samples collected from standard prenatal tests like

  • By Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • August 18, 2022
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  • Can Your Smartphone Spot a Narrowed Neck Artery?

    A smartphone video could detect a blocked blood vessel in your neck that could cause a stroke, a new study suggests.

    The American Heart Association says videos may provide a non-invasive way to screen people who are at risk of stroke.

    Nearly 87% of strokes are the ischemic type, which happens when fatty depos...

    Hearing Loss, Tinnitus Can Strike Cancer Survivors

    People who've had chemotherapy to treat a range of common cancers should also have a hearing test.

    In a new study of 273 cancer survivors, researchers found more than half experienced significant hearing loss even if they didn't realize it.

    “While hearing loss associated with the admin...

    Race Plays Role in How Soon Babies With Cystic Fibrosis Get Care

    Babies who are white appear to get diagnostic appointments for cystic fibrosis earlier than babies of several other races and ethnicities, new research shows.

    This can cause gaps in care and outcomes.

    While it is recommended that infants who have an initial positive screening for cystic fibrosis be furt...

    Myths, Ignorance Persist Around Lung Cancer: Poll

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States, but doctors have had access to a screening tool for nearly a decade that can catch it for early treatment.

    Unfortunately, neither of those facts has sunk in for many Americans, according to a new survey from the American Lung Association (ALA).

    Only 29% of Americans know that

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • August 1, 2022
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  • Texas Court Case Could Threaten Americans' Health Care Nationwide

    A federal lawsuit out of Texas could end access to free lifesaving preventive health care services for nearly 168 million people in the United States with private insurance, a new report suggests.

    Kelley v. Becerra seeks to overturn the

  • By Robin Foster and Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporters
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  • July 27, 2022
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  • Black Patients More Likely to Lose Vision After Glaucoma Diagnosis

    Black patients should start screening early for glaucoma, because they have a high risk of vision loss caused by elevated pressure levels inside the eye, researchers say.

    A team from New York Eye and Ear Infirmary of Mount Sinai found that African heritage was an independent risk factor for

  • By Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • July 26, 2022
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  • Regular Screening Pays Off for People at High Risk for Pancreatic Cancer

    Pancreatic cancer often has a dismal prognosis, but a new study finds that screening high-risk people can catch the disease early and extend lives.

    Researchers at eight U.S. medical centers found that annual screening tests paid off for patients at high risk of pancreatic cancer due to genetics. Of those diagnosed with the cancer through screening, most had it caught at an early stage, an...

    Why Do Black Women Have More Delays for Lifesaving Breast Biopsies?

    Women of color may face delays in getting a biopsy after a screening mammogram suggests they might have breast cancer, a large, new study finds.

    Researchers found that compared with white women, Asian, Black and Hispanic women were all more likely to wait over a month ...

    HIV Testing Plummeted During Pandemic

    Testing for HIV suffered a sharp setback during the first year of the pandemic, new government data shows.

    The number of HIV tests funded by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and administered in health care settings dropped 43% between 2019 and 2020, the study showed. Tests administered in non-he...

    New Approach Cuts Odds for Anal Cancer in People With HIV

    Treating precancerous anal growths in people with HIV slashes their risk of anal cancer by more than half, according to a new study.

    Researchers found that treating these growths - called high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL) - is a safe a...

    COVID Testing Requirement Lifted for Travelers Flying to the U.S.

    A requirement for all international travelers flying to the United States to take a COVID-19 test within a day of departure will be lifted on Sunday, a senior Biden administration official said Friday.

    The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has determined the regulation is no longer necessary, but will reevaluate the need for a COVID-19 testing requirement every 90 days, the ...

    Pandemic Caused Millions of U.S. Women to Skip Cancer Screenings

    Millions of U.S. women missed breast, cervical and colon cancer screenings due to the COVID-19 pandemic, according to a new study.

    It found that compared to 2018, the number of women in 2020 who said they had breast cancer screening in the past year fell by 2.13 million (6%). The number of women who ...

    U.S. Hospitals Are Facing Shortage of Dye Needed for Life-Saving Scans

    U.S. hospitals are running low on contrast dye injected into patients undergoing enhanced X-rays, CT scans and MRIs.

    The fluid, which makes the routine but potentially life-saving scans readable, helps doctors identify clots in the heart and brain. The shortage is expected to last until at least June 30, t...

    Obesity Stigma Keeps Many From Life-Saving Cancer Screening: Study

    Many people who are overweight or obese avoid cancer screening for fear of stigma and judgment about their weight, British researchers report.

    In a review of 10 published studies, researchers found that many doctors around the world don't look kindly on patients with obesity, an attitude that can affect tre...

    Nearly Half of High-Risk Patients Delay Follow-Up After Lung Cancer Screening

    Annual lung cancer screenings are strongly encouraged for men and women in danger of developing lung cancer. But new research finds that among those who do get assessed, nearly half fail to seek prompt follow-up care when the CT scans pick up a potential problem.

    The stats are troubling, said study author Dr. Matthew Triplette, who stressed "that the whole point of

  • Alan Mozes HealthDay Reporter
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  • May 18, 2022
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