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Health News Results - 30

COVID Booster Shot Helps Cancer Patients

A COVID-19 vaccine booster shot gives cancer patients -- especially those with blood cancer -- much-needed protection, new research reports.

"Our study demonstrates in clear terms how the booster shot can make all the difference for some people with compromised immune systems, such as people with cancer," study co-author Dr. Balazs Halmos said in a news release from Montefiore Health Syst...

Drug Used to Prevent Miscarriage May Raise Lifetime Cancer Risk in Offspring

People who were exposed to a particular hormonal medication in the womb may have a heightened risk of cancer later in life, a new study suggests.

Researchers found the increased cancer risk among adults whose mothers had been given injections of a synthetic progesterone known as 17-OHPC, or 17P, during pregnancy. The study participants were born in the 1960s, when the drug was used to hel...

Many Blood Cancer Patients Get Little Protection From COVID Vaccine

Anti-vaxxers felt their suspicions confirmed when former U.S. Secretary of State Colin Powell died from COVID-19 complications in mid-October despite being fully vaccinated.

But Powell, 84, was being treated for blood cancer at the time of his death, and a new study reports that the COVID vaccines are producing little to no protection for some cancer patients.

Nearly 3 out of 5 bloo...

Blood Cancer Patients Could Benefit From COVID Booster Shot: Study

Patients with B-cell blood cancers who did not make antibodies to COVID-19 after two shots of vaccine may find that a third shot does the trick, new research finds.

More than half the patients who had failed to respond to the first two shots had a positive response to the third, or booster, shot, according to the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society study.

"The additional COVID-19 vaccine do...

Mixed Progress Against Cancers in Teens, Young Adults

There's some encouraging news for U.S. teens and young adults with cancer.

Survival rates have improved for several types of cancer, though gains have been limited for some common kinds, according to a long-term study published online July 26 in the journal Cancer.

The researchers used a wealth of accumulated data "to piece together a larger part of the cancer survival st...

For People With Heart Failure, Statins May Lower Cancer Risk Too

Many people with heart failure take a cholesterol-lowering statin, and new research suggests those pills might also lower their odds for cancer.

Researchers analyzed data from more than 87,000 people in Hong Kong who had no history of cancer and were hospitalized for heart failure between 2003 and 2015.

They were followed until they were diagnosed with cancer, died or until the end ...

Survivors' Plasma Helps Blood Cancer Patients Battle COVID-19

Giving COVID-19 survivors' blood plasma to blood cancer patients hospitalized with COVID-19 significantly improves their chances of survival, a new study finds.

"These results suggest that convalescent plasma may not only help COVID-19 patients with blood cancers whose immune systems are compromised, it may also help patients with other illnesses who have weakened antibody responses to th...

Study Pinpoints Cancer Patients at Highest Risk From COVID

Hospitalized patients with active cancer are more likely to die from COVID-19 than those who've survived cancer and patients who've never had cancer, a new study shows.

Researchers analyzed the records of nearly 4,200 patients hospitalized at NYU Langone Medical Center in New York City who tested positive for SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. Of those patients, 233 had an active...

Young, Immune-Compromised Patients Are Hotspots for Coronavirus Mutations: Study

COVID-19 infections may last longer in young people with weakened immune systems, and that extended period could lead to more mutations in SARS-CoV-2, according to the authors of a new case study.

The study included two children and a young adult who had weakened immune systems due to treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. For months, they tested positive for SARS-CoV-2, the virus th...

COVID Vaccines Might Not Protect Certain Cancer Patients

People with cancers of the blood, bone marrow or lymph nodes are at an increased risk of not making protective coronavirus antibodies after COVID-19 vaccination, a new study warns.

The risk is particularly high for those with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). The researchers urged these patients and those who interact with them to get vaccinated but to keep wearing masks and practicing...

She's Beating Leukemia With a Healthy Change to Her Diet

Angie Gaytan never cared much for beets, but beets sure do love her -- doctors say that veggie shakes, fruits, beet juice and other healthy foods likely helped the 16-year-old defeat her life-threatening leukemia.

Such a healthy diet helped more than Angie: A new study found that adopting a low-fat, low-sugar diet appeared to boost the effectiveness of chemotherapy in a group of 40 childr...

Adding in Stem Cell Therapy Helps Beat a Common Childhood Leukemia

Combining stem cell transplants with cutting-edge immunotherapy prevents leukemia relapses in young people and improves their chances of survival, new research suggests.

Acute lymphoblastic leukemia is the most common childhood cancer.

This study included 50 patients (ages: 4 to 30) with acute lymphoblastic leukemia who received CAR T-cell therapy. The treatment genetically modifies...

When Heart Attack Strikes, Cancer Patients Often Miss Out on Lifesaving Treatment

Too few cancer patients who have a heart attack are receiving emergency angioplasties that could save their lives, a new study finds.

"This is an important study, which underscores the broader issue in cardio-oncology of cancer patients too often being passed over for potentially beneficial procedures," said Dr. Robert Copeland-Halperin, a cardiologist unconnected to the new research.

...

Why Do Black Patients Fare Worse With Blood Cancer Than Whites?

A pair of studies shed new light on why a relatively rare blood cancer -- acute myeloid leukemia (AML) -- is more deadly among Black patients.

The takeaways: Where patients live and their access to quality health care matter. And even when Black people with AML have the same access to treatment as white patients, their survival is shorter -- something genetic differences might explain.

Should Cancer Survivors Be Prioritized for COVID Vaccine?

Cancer survivors have higher odds of dying from seasonal flu, suggesting they may also be at increased risk from COVID-19 and may need to be among the first in line for vaccination against both diseases.

Researchers from the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine analyzed medical data from more than 630,000 people in the United Kingdom between 1990 and 2014, including more than 10...

Drug Combo May Be Safe, Effective Therapy for Rare Leukemia

A combination of two "targeted" therapies can beat back a rare form of blood cancer -- without the toxic effects of chemotherapy, a new study has found.

In a trial of 63 patients, researchers found that the drug regimen frequently wiped out all signs of the cancer -- a subtype of the blood cancer acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). And at 18 months, 95% of patients were still aliv...

Almost 90,000 Young American Adults Will Get Cancer This Year: Report

Nearly 90,000 Americans between 15 and 39 years of age will be diagnosed with cancer this year and more than 9,200 will die, a new report projects.

One hematologist who deals with younger cancer patients said the shock of a diagnosis at this point in their lives can be overwhelming.

"This population is unique, they're in the prime of their lives," said Dr. Tina Bhatnagar, w...

Fewer Kids in Cancer Trials, Which Might Not Be a Bad Thing

There's been a sharp decline in the number of U.S. children taking part in cancer clinical trials over the past few decades, but researchers say that might be good news.

Why? Having more effective treatments available now may be one reason for that decrease, they explained.

The researchers, from the University of Colorado Cancer Center, analyzed national data and found that ...

Health Risks Persist for Young Cancer Survivors

Teen and young adult cancer survivors are nearly twice as likely to be hospitalized as those who haven't had cancer, a new study finds.

"Few studies have investigated health risk in adolescents and young adults after cancer treatment," said study author Chelsea Anderson, a postdoctoral fellow at the American Cancer Society.

She and her colleagues from the University of Utah ...

Bone Marrow Transplants Less Risky Now

The risks faced by U.S. bone marrow transplant patients have dropped sharply, a new study shows.

While this type of transplant can be lifesaving for patients with blood cancers (such as leukemia) and other diseases, there are potentially life-threatening risks, the researchers noted.

But the new analysis of 1,148 patients who had bone marrow transplants at the Seattle Cancer...

Fewer Childhood Cancer Survivors Getting Hit by Heart Troubles

Since the 1970s, serious heart disease among childhood cancer survivors had declined remarkably, a new study finds.

The decline suggests that efforts to make cancer treatments, including radiation, less toxic are paying off, researchers say.

For the study, researchers led by Dr. Daniel Mulrooney, from St. Jude Children's Research Hospital in Memphis, Tenn., collected data ...

Nearly 20 Years Later, Cancer Rates Higher in 9/11 First Responders

Nearly two decades after terrorists attacked New York's World Trade Center, certain cancers are striking police and recovery workers who saved lives, recovered bodies and cleaned up the wreckage.

This particular group of responders appears to have an increased risk of developing thyroid cancer, leukemia and prostate cancer, as well as a slightly elevated overall risk of cancer, resear...

Cancer Drug Shows Promise for Parkinson's Patients

A drug used to fight chronic myeloid leukemia might also relieve symptoms of Parkinson's disease, a new study finds.

In a phase 2 clinical trial, researchers found that the drug nilotinib (brand name: Tasigna) increased production of dopamine and halted decline in motor function. It was well-tolerated by most participants.

"We found that nilotinib is reasonably safe using d...

Can More Exercise Improve Thinking Skills in Cancer Survivors?

Boosting exercise capacity may protect the mental functioning of childhood leukemia survivors, according to a new study.

Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common childhood cancer. Due to their disease and treatment, childhood ALL survivors are at increased risk for problems with thinking and memory, as well as reduced exercise capacity, researchers said.

"Our re...

Drug Offers Hope Against a Tough-to-Treat Blood Cancer

Patients with a form of blood cancer known as multiple myeloma who haven't responded to other therapies might have a new weapon against the disease, researchers say.

A drug called selinexor appeared to help patients with the blood and bone marrow cancer, according to a clinical trial involving 122 people.

"This study proved that a novel, first-in-class drug with a new mechan...

New Study Finds a Family Risk for Blood Cancer

If a close relative has had blood cancer, you're more likely to get it, a large new study reports.

The researchers analyzed data from 16 million people in Sweden, including more than 153,000 diagnosed with blood cancer and more than 391,000 of their first-degree relatives: parents, siblings or children.

Patients with a family link accounted for 4.1% of all blood cancer ...

Drug Duo May Be an Advance Against a Common Leukemia

A two-drug combo helps patients with a common form of leukemia survive longer than the current standard of care, a new clinical trial finds.

The phase 3 trial of more than 500 U.S. patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) found that a combination of rituximab and ibrutinib extended patient survival.

Specifically, 89.4% of the patients who received the experimenta...

Millions of Life Years, Billions of Dollars Lost to Cancer Each Year

More than 8.7 million years of life and about $94 billion in earnings were lost to cancer in the United States in 2015, researchers say.

Cancer is the nation's second-leading killer and is expected to cause nearly 607,000 deaths this year. These premature deaths and the lost productivity they cause impose a significant economic burden, the study authors explained.

In this s...

Ancestry Matters When Seeking Matched Bone Marrow Donors

The chances of finding an unrelated bone marrow donor are higher for U.S. patients of European descent than for those of non-European descent, a new study finds.

A bone marrow transplant can sometimes help people with life-threatening blood cancers by replacing the patient's cells with healthy ones from a donor. A brother or sister with the same genetic markers as the recipient is the...

Fertility Treatments Don't Raise Cancer Risk for Offspring

All expectant parents worry, and for those undergoing fertility treatments, there are additional concerns about the health of their child.

But a new study finds one less thing they need to stress over -- their children don't appear to be at greater risk of cancer than other children.

"These results provide reassuring evidence that children conceived as a result of fertility ...