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25 Jan

More Kids Suffering Eye Injuries From Hand Sanitizers

And a significant number are undergoing surgery for severe eye lesions, researchers say

Health News Results - 931

The Bigger the City, the Lower the Depression Rates?

TUESDAY, Aug. 3, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Americans living in big cities have relatively low rates of depression, despite the hustle and bustle -- or maybe because of it, a new study suggests.

Researchers found that compared with smaller U.S. cities, big urban hubs generally had lower rates of depression among residents. And they think the pattern can b...

Use Facebook a Lot? You're More Likely to Be Unvaccinated

Americans who get their COVID-19 news and information solely from Facebook have much lower vaccination rates than the general population.

That's the takeaway from a new survey of nearly 20,700 people across the United States. The researchers asked them in June which of six sources they use for COVID-19 news and info. The six included: Facebook, CNN, Fox News, MSNBC, the Biden administrati...

How Did the Pandemic Affect Cancer Clinical Trials?

MONDAY, Aug. 2, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- The pandemic widely disrupted medical care across the United States, but a new study reports that clinical trials testing cancer treatments were able to carry on.

Researchers found that U.S. cancer trials quickly responded to the pandemic in the early months, allowing the studies to get back on track after an initial — and stee...

Leading U.S. Ob-Gyn Groups Urge COVID Vaccines for All Pregnant Women

All pregnant women should be vaccinated "without delay" against COVID-19, two leading groups of U.S. obstetric specialists recommend.

That advice — from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) and the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine (SMFM) — is based on tens of thousands of cases over the past several months showing that vaccination during pregnancy is safe....

Take This Refresher on Skin Safety in Summer Sun

Sun protection is essential as you enjoy the outdoors this summer, a skin expert stresses.

"Skin cancer is the most common cancer in humans so it's important that we do what we can to protect ourselves," Dr. Ida Orengo, a professor of dermatology at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, said in a school news release.

Here are some of her tips:

  • Wear a sunscreen with SPF ...

Biden Reverses Trump Policy Limiting U.S. Nursing Home Fines

The Biden administration has reversed a Trump policy that limited the size of fines that U.S. nursing homes could be slapped with for violating safety standards.

The Trump policy was adopted in 2017 and prevented the U.S. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) from hitting a nursing home with a fine for each day it didn't comply with federal standards.

That reduced many pe...

Severe Opioid Overdoses Rose by Nearly a Third During Pandemic

Opioid overdose-related visits to U.S. emergency departments rose by nearly one-third during the COVID-19 pandemic last year.

That's the key finding in a new analysis of data from 25 emergency departments in Alabama, Colorado, Connecticut, North Carolina, Massachusetts and Rhode Island.

"COVID-19, and the disruptions in every part of our social and work lives, made this situation ev...

CDC Now Says Vaccinated Should Be Tested After COVID Exposure, Even Without Symptoms

People fully vaccinated against COVID-19 should be tested for the virus if they come into contact with infected people, whether or not they have symptoms, say updated testing guidelines from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The agency previously said that fully vaccinated people did not need to be tested after exposure to the virus unless they had symptoms, The New...

McCormick Recalls Seasonings Over Salmonella Risk

McCormick & Co. on Wednesday announced the recall of several of its popular seasonings because of potential salmonella contamination.

Included in the recall are McCormick Perfect Pinch Italian Seasoning, McCormick Culina...

'Moderate' Drinking May Be Heart-Healthy

WEDNESDAY, July 28, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Here's a reason to not feel guilty about drinking a glass of wine every evening: A new study suggests that people who drink moderately may have lower risks for both heart attack and stroke than teetotalers — even when they have a history of heart issues.

The researchers found that among over 48,000 people with previous card...

Bogus Info on Cancer Common Online, and It Can Harm

Don't believe everything you read on social media about cancer and cancer treatment.

A new study finds that one-third of the most popular articles on social media about treatment for common cancers contains misinformation -- and most of it can be downright dangerous.

"The worst-case scenario is when it leads to a person declining proven cancer treatments in favor of a treatment tha...

Severe COVID for People Under 45: Who's Most at Risk?

TUESDAY, July 27, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Young people aren't immune from severe COVID-19, and a new study warns that some are more at risk than others.

Folks under 45 have more than triple the risk for severe COVID-19 if they have cancer or heart disease, or blood, neurologic or endocrine disorders, according to Mayo Clinic researchers.

"One of the surprising fi...

The Heat Is On: Staying Safe When Temperatures Soar


Midsummer heat and high humidity aren't just uncomfortable -- they're a combo that can cause serious illness and even death.

"Whenever you walk or do outdoor activity, take a friend with you who can help you if you run into trouble," Dr. Eleanor Dunham advised. She's an emergency medicine doctor at Penn State Health Milton S. Hershey Medical Center in Hershey, Pa.

Babies and sen...

U.S. to Stick With International Travel Restrictions

The rapid spread of the highly contagious Delta variant around the world means that the United States will continue with COVID-19 international travel restrictions for now, a White House official said Monday.

The Delta variant now accounts for 83% of all U.S. coronavirus cases, according to the U.S. Ce...

Survey Finds U.S. Parents Split on COVID Vaccination for Kids Under 12

As a new school year approaches, U.S. parents are nearly evenly split on whether they'll vaccinate their young kids when a COVID-19 vaccine is approved for their age group, a new survey finds.

"It's important that parents and providers don't wait for full COVID vaccine approval to begin discussions about vaccination," said Sarah Clark, co-director of the C.S. Mott Children's Hospital Nati...

Kids Still Dying From Accidental Exposure to Fentanyl Pain Patches

Accidental exposure to fentanyl pain patches is putting children's lives at risk, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration warns.

Fentanyl is a powerful opioid pain reliever; so powerful that fentanyl patches are typically only prescribed to patients who require round-the-clock, long-term pain relief, such as cancer patients. They're generally replaced every three days.

Kids can overdo...

Regulators Pressure AirBnB, Vrbo After Another Child Dies in Elevator Accident

The death of another child between a residential elevator's inner and outer doors had prompted the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) to call on Airbnb and other vacation rental ...

Money Can Buy Americans Longer Life: Study

Money may not buy happiness but new research suggests it may at least help Americans live longer.

"Our results suggest that building wealth is important for health at the individual level, even after accounting for where one starts out in life," said Greg Miller, a faculty fellow at Northwestern University's Institute for Policy Research, in Chicago. "So, from a public health perspective,...

'Superbug' Fungus Spreads Among Vulnerable in Two U.S. Cities

An untreatable "superbug" fungus is spreading in a Washington, D.C., nursing home and two Dallas-area hospitals, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Thursday.

There were 101 candida auris cases at the nursing home and 22 cases at the hospitals from January to April, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, which did not identify the f...

As Olympics Begin, Tokyo Posts Highest Number of New COVID Cases in Six Months

One day before the official start of the Tokyo Olympics, the city has recorded its highest number of new COVID-19 cases in six months.

The 1,979 cases reported on Thursday are the most seen since 2,044 cases were recorded on Jan. 15, according to the Associated Press.

Japan has reported about 853,000 cases and 15,100 deaths since the pandemic began, most of them this year....

Even at Same Hospital, Black Patients Face More Complications Than Whites

THURSDAY, July 22, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Black Americans admitted for inpatient hospital care are far more likely than white patients to experience safety-related health complications -- even when both are treated in the same facility, a new report warns.

And having good insurance didn't appear to bridge racial differences in patient safety, investigators found: Even...

Empty Stadiums, COVID Fears: How Will It Affect Olympic Athletes?

To do their best, Olympic athletes need to be both physically and mentally fit, but the COVID-19 pandemic and its restrictions at the Tokyo Olympics has made that a real challenge, experts say.

"This Olympics is unprecedented," said Dr. Michael Lardon, an associate clinical professor of psychiatry at the University of California, San Diego.

The Tokyo Olympics itself, which officiall...

Could Coffee, Veggies Lower Your Odds for COVID-19?

Coffee delivers the boost that many people need to start their day. Now, new research suggests this breakfast powerhouse may also provide some protection against COVID-19.

Consuming vegetables and having been breastfed might also reduce your COVID-19 risk, according to the new study from Northwestern University in Chicago. Conversely, processed meats may increase your susceptibility to th...

1.5 Million Kids Worldwide Lost Parent or Other Caregiver to COVID-19

In yet another finding that illustrates the tragic toll the pandemic has taken on families around the world, a new study shows that 1.5 million children have lost a parent, grandparent or other caregiver to COVID-19.

"For every two COVID-19 deaths worldwide, one child is left behind to face the death of a parent or caregiver. By April 30, 2021, these 1.5 million children had become the tr...

Double Trouble: Wildfire Smoke Could Boost Odds for COVID's Spread

Breathing in smoke from wildfires may significantly increase the spread of COVID-19, researchers say.

The warning, from a new study of links between smoke-caused air pollution and SARS-CoV-2 infections, comes as firefighters battle 80 large wildfires in the western United States. The largest — 300 miles south of Portland, Ore. — covers over 500 square miles.

For this study, rese...

Pediatricians' Group: All School Kids, Staff Should Continue to Wear Masks

All U.S. students, teachers and staff should wear masks when in school, regardless of their vaccination status, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) said Monday.

That guidance runs counter to recommendations released by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention earlier this month: Those guidelines said teachers and students who are vaccinated can enter schools without masks,...

Shock Therapy Safe, Effective for Tough-to-Treat Depression

MONDAY, July 19, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- "Shock" therapy often helps lift severe depression, but fear and stigma can deter patients from getting it. Now a large new study is confirming the treatment's safety.

Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), as it's medically known, has been around for decades. For almost as long, it's been seen in a bad light -- fueled by disturbing m...

Monkeypox Case Confirmed in U.S. Resident, Threat of Spread Is Low

A case of monkeypox has been confirmed in an American who had recently traveled to Nigeria, U.S. health officials reported. Officials believe the threat of the virus spreading to others is low.

Monkeypox is a rare but potentially serious viral illness that's in the same family of viruses as smallpox, but causes a milder infection, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prev...

High-Dose Withdrawal Drug in ER Can Help Battle Opioid Addiction

Giving high doses of buprenorphine in the emergency department is a safe and effective way of treating withdrawal symptoms in patients battling opioid addiction, according to a new study.

"Emergency departments are at the front lines of treating people with opioid use disorder and helping them overcome barriers to recovery such as withdrawal," said Dr. Nora Volkow, director of the U.S. Na...

Make Summer Camp Safe for Your Child With Asthma, Allergies

With many summer camps open again this year, parents of kids with asthma and allergies need to make sure the one they choose is safe for their youngsters.

While federal health officials have issued guidelines to protect campers and staff from COVID-19, "camps still need to make sure measures are in place in case a camper has an allergic reaction or an asthma flare," said Dr. Luz Fonacier,...

It's BBQ Season, Prime Time for Grill Fires

If you're not careful, your grilling season could go up in flames, an expert warns.

Each year, U.S. fire departments respond to about 5,700 residential barbecue fires, according to the Federal Emergency Management Agency's U.S. Fire Administration. Those fires result in thousands of emergency department visits and $37 million in damages a year.

"The best way to prevent damages and i...

FDA to Prioritize Full Approval for Pfizer COVID Vaccine

Pfizer Inc. announced on Friday that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has granted priority review to its COVID-19 vaccine, positioning the vaccine for full approval by January.

The Pfizer vaccine has been administered to more Americans than any other shot so far in the U.S. vaccination campaign. According to data from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, some 85 milli...

Friends, Family Key to Turning a 'No' on Vaccination to a 'Yes'

Public health officials and government workers are trying everything they can to promote COVID-19 vaccination — advertisements, news releases, cash lotteries, and even incentives like free beer, joints or doughnuts in some places.

But nothing sways a vaccine-hesitant person more than a word with a family member, friend or their own doctor, a new Kaiser Family Foundation (KFF) poll revea...

Chinese Man Hospitalized With H5N6 Bird Flu

A man in China has been hospitalized with the H5N6 strain of avian flu, which is one of several potentially dangerous strains that can infect humans.

The 55-year-old man came down with a fever and tested positive for the virus on July 6. He was hospitalized in Bazhong, a city in the province of Sichuan, according to the state-run China Global Television Network, The New York Times

Drowning Deaths for U.S. Kids Have Fallen 38% Since 1999

There's some good news as millions of American children head back to the nations' lakes, beaches and pools: Newly released numbers for 1999 through 2019 show steady progress in reducing the number of young lives lost to drowning.

"Over the past two decades, the rate of unintentional drowning deaths among children aged 0 to 17 years declined 38%, from 1.6 per 100,000 in 1999 to 1.0 in 2019...

Antibiotic-Resistant Pneumonia Is Killing Children in Bangladesh — Could It Spread?

Antibiotic-resistant bacteria is causing deadly pneumonia infections among large numbers of children in the South Asian nation of Bangladesh, a rising threat that could one day reach American shores, experts warn.

Doctors found these "superbug" bacteria in more than three of four children with a positive blood culture for bacterial pneumonia while being treated at a major Bangladesh hospi...

Half of U.S. Teens Plan to Get COVID Shot, But Can Numbers Go Higher?

Vaccine advocate Ethan Lindenberger, now 20, had to wait until age 18 to get the vaccinations that he knew he needed to protect his health.

"I knew growing up my mom was very anti-vaccine. Because of the legal restrictions, I really wasn't trying to fight her on getting me vaccinated," Lindenberger recalled. "She believed vaccines could kill me, and so it was not going to be an easy time....

Five Neutrogena and Aveeno Spray Sunscreens Recalled Due to Benzene

Five Neutrogena and Aveeno spray sunscreen products have been recalled because they may contain small amounts of benzene, Johnson & Johnson announced Wednesday.

Benzene is a human carcinogen and can get into the body through the skin, through the mouth and by inhalation, the company said in a statement.

"Out of an abundance of caution, we are recalling all lots of these specific aer...

Extreme Heat Hits Poorer Neighborhoods Harder

Extreme heat strikes poor and minority neighborhoods in U.S. cities harder than those that are wealthier and mainly white, a new study finds.

"The distribution of excess urban heat varies within cities, and as a result, communities do not share a city's extreme heat burden equally," said study co-author Jennifer Burney. She's chair of global climate policy and research at the University o...

Pandemic Delays in Screening Mean More Breast Cancer Deaths Ahead: Study

WEDNESDAY, July 14, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- The COVID-19 pandemic could leave a grim legacy for women's health.

New research suggests that disruptions in breast cancer screening and treatment in the United States during the COVID-19 pandemic could lead to an increase in deaths from the disease.

While mammography rates have accelerated in 2021, "facilities should ...

Get COVID-19 Vaccines to Poor Nations Instead of Making Booster Shots: WHO

COVID-19 vaccine makers such as Pfizer should focus on getting shots to poor countries instead of trying to persuade wealthy nations to give their citizens booster shots, World Health Organization (WHO) officials said at a press briefing held Monday.

Despite a lack of evidence that third doses of vaccines are necessary, drug companies are lobbying the United States and other Western coun...

Average Soda Fountain Serving Exceeds Daily Recommended Added Sugars

You'll get more than a day's worth of added sugars when you pour a soda fountain drink at most U.S. restaurant chains, a new report finds.

Even small-sized drinks exceed recommended guidelines, said researchers at the Center for Science in the Public Interest (CSPI).

For the study, CSPI researchers examined levels of added sugar in full-calorie soda fountain drinks at the top 20 re...

She Got Her Shots and Is Helping Other Seniors Rejoin Society

Before the COVID-19 pandemic, Sandra Banner was an active octogenarian. She enjoyed going to movies, traveling from her Palm Desert, Calif., home to Los Angeles for Dodgers baseball games and having friends over for happy hours.

Early on, she avoided isolation by teaching outdoor tai chi classes and staying engaged online, but once she was fully vaccinated, Banner, 85, was ready to get ba...

Black Churches Could Be Key to Boosting Vaccination Rates

Black churches could prove crucial in improving COVID-19 vaccination rates among Black Americans, a new study suggests.

The COVID-19 death rate among Black Americans is three times higher than among white Americans, and health officials had hoped that vaccines would narrow that gap.

However, Black communities are disproportionately affected by barriers to vaccination, such as limite...

Woman Infected With Two COVID-19 Variants at Once

An elderly woman in Belgium was simultaneously infected with two COVID-19 variants of concern, according to a report describing one of the first documented cases of co-infection.

The authors said their findings highlight the need for health care providers to be watchful for double infections and the emergence of new variants.

The 90-year-old woman was hospitalized in Aalst, Belgium,...

DIY Projects Can Be Prime Time for Foot Injuries

When you tackle home and yard projects this summer, be sure to protect your feet and ankles.

"Feet may be the last thing people think about while working on home-improvement projects, but we see so many different types of foot and ankle injuries in our office -- many of which can be avoided with proper shoe wear and extra caution," said Dr. Amber Shane, a foot and ankle surgeon in the Orl...

Vaccinated Teachers, Students Can Skip Masks This Fall: CDC

When schools open their doors this fall, teachers and students who are vaccinated can enter without masks, according to a new guidance issued Friday by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The relaxed recommendation comes as a national vaccination campaign in which children as young as 12 can get COVID-19 shots unfolds, accompanied by a general decline in coronavirus hospi...

COVID Cases Surge in Los Angeles County as Delta Variant Spreads

There is "exponential growth" of coronavirus cases in Los Angeles County as the Delta variant becomes the dominant strain, health officials there reported Thursday.

Even though 60% of people older than 16 in the county have been fully vaccinated, the case rate rose from 1.74 cases to 3.5 cases per 100,000 people in one week, according to a Los Angeles County Department of Public Health ne...

Chinese CoronaVac Vaccine 83.5% Effective Against Symptomatic COVID

A double dose of China's CoronaVac vaccine is 83.5% effective against symptomatic COVID-19, researchers say.

Their phase 3 trial included more than 10,000 people, aged 18 to 59, in Turkey who received either two doses of CoronaVac 14 days apart or an inactive placebo.

An immune response analysis of 981 participants who got the vaccine found that it triggered a strong immune response...

Your Job Could Put You at Much Higher Risk for Flu

Your job may significantly increase your risk of catching the flu, with potential implications for the spread of other infectious diseases including COVID-19, according to new research.

On average, working folks are 35% more likely to get the flu than those without jobs, but an analysis of U.S. federal data found sharp differences between certain jobs and industries.

The more work-r...

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