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13 May

Alarming Increase in Esophageal Cancer in Middle-Aged Americans, Study Finds

The rate of esophageal cancer in adults ages 45 to 64 nearly doubled over an 8-year span, researchers say.

12 May

High Blood Pressure During Pregnancy Linked to Heart Disease Later in Life

Pregnant women who experience gestational hypertension or preeclampsia at increased risk for heart disease later in life, researchers say.

11 May

Injections of Your Own Fat Could Help Arthritic Hands

A new, nonsurgical treatment for finger arthritis called lipofilling significantly relieves pain and improves hand function, study finds.

Arthroscopy: A Viable Treatment Option for Painful Hip Joints

Arthroscopy: A Viable Treatment Option for Painful Hip Joints

College basketball player Joey Liedel suffered years of debilitating hip pain that limited his ability to play.

As a freshman at University of Detroit-Mercy, he was in constant discomfort. Eventually, the Erie, Mich., athlete underwent hip surgery and took some time off to get comfortable on the court again.

The 6-foot-1 guard had a...

  • By Robert Preidt HealthDay Reporter
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  • May 15, 2022
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Warm Water Danger: What to Know About Flesh-Eating Bacteria

Warm Water Danger: What to Know About Flesh-Eating Bacteria

If heading back into the water this summer has you concerned about flesh-eating bacteria, an expert offers some advice.

"Flesh-eating bacteria refers to an infection that spreads so rapidly that the skin and surrounding soft tissue starts to die," explained Dr. Stacey Rose, an assistant professor of infectious diseases at Baylor College o...

  • By Robert Preidt HealthDay Reporter
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  • May 14, 2022
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AHA News: Improved Fitness Gave Man Chance to Walk Daughter Down the Aisle After Heart Attack

AHA News: Improved Fitness Gave Man Chance to Walk Daughter Down the Aisle After Heart Attack

Justin Ballard of Prairie Grove, Arkansas, stared at the photos in disbelief.

"Do I really look that big?" he thought.

The pictures came from a joyous occasion – Christmas Day 2019, when Kelsey, the oldest of his three children, had gotten engaged.

The couple set a wedding date in October 2021. Justin vowed to be in much bett...

  • By American Heart Association News HealthDay Reporter
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  • May 13, 2022
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AHA News: Black, Hispanic Adults Less Likely to Receive CPR, Especially in Public

AHA News: Black, Hispanic Adults Less Likely to Receive CPR, Especially in Public

Black or Hispanic adults who experience a witnessed cardiac arrest outside the hospital are substantially less likely than their white peers to receive lifesaving care from a bystander, preliminary new research shows.

CPR was least likely for Black and Hispanic adults in a less personal setting, such as on the street or in a public transpo...

  • By American Heart Association News HealthDay Reporter
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  • May 13, 2022
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Kidney Transplant Safe When Organ Donor Has COVID: Study

Kidney Transplant Safe When Organ Donor Has COVID: Study

Even before the pandemic, the demand for donor kidneys far exceeded supply. That shortfall only worsened when hospitals started refusing to use kidneys from COVID-positive donors.

However, new research now suggests that kidneys from deceased COVID-19 patients have almost zero risk of viral transmission to the recipient:

In the new s...

  • Alan Mozes HealthDay Reporter
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  • May 13, 2022
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Big Rise in Esophageal Cancers Among Middle-Aged Americans

Big Rise in Esophageal Cancers Among Middle-Aged Americans

FRIDAY, May 13, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- Esophageal cancer tends to be a "silent killer," and it's on the rise among middle-aged Americans, new evidence suggests.

The rate of this cancer nearly doubled among people aged 45 to 64, and the prevalence of Barrett’s esophagus -- a precancerous condition -- rose by about 50%...

  • Denise Mann HealthDay Reporter
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  • May 13, 2022
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Gallstones Can Warn of Pancreatic Cancer Risk

Gallstones Can Warn of Pancreatic Cancer Risk

A diagnosis of pancreatic cancer may feel like a death sentence because this fast-moving disease is often discovered at a later stage, when it's harder to treat.

Now, a new study offers hope for earlier diagnosis, finding an association between recent gallstone disease and pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC).

Patients diagnosed...

  • Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • May 13, 2022
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Too Few People Treated for Opioid Use Get Anti-Overdose Med

Too Few People Treated for Opioid Use Get Anti-Overdose Med

A potentially lifesaving drug that reduces overdose risk is prescribed to less than half of Americans treated for opioid addiction, a new study finds.

This underuse of buprenorphine is "equivalent to giving those with advanced cancer a less aggressive treatment," said senior investigator Dr. Laura Bierut. She is a professor of psychiatry ...

  • By Robert Preidt HealthDay Reporter
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  • May 13, 2022
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In Animal Studies, Gene Therapy Shows Promise for Spinal Cord Injury Pain

In Animal Studies, Gene Therapy Shows Promise for Spinal Cord Injury Pain

An experimental gene therapy for spinal cord pain shows promise in mice, researchers say.

About half of spinal cord injury patients have neuropathy, which is chronic or debilitating pain, tingling, numbness or muscle weakness caused by damaged or malfunctioning nerves.

Treatment of neuropathy can be challenging. For example, medica...

  • By Robert Preidt HealthDay Reporter
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  • May 13, 2022
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Is Telemedicine Closing the 'Race Gap' in Primary Care?

Is Telemedicine Closing the 'Race Gap' in Primary Care?

Here's one way in which the pandemic did not exacerbate health care disparities: A new study shows that telemedicine has closed the gap in access to primary care between Black and non-Black Americans.

The use of telemedicine boomed during the pandemic, so University of Pennsylvania researchers decided to examine how that affected Black pa...

  • By Robert Preidt HealthDay Reporter
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  • May 13, 2022
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Heavy Antibiotic Use Tied to Development of Crohn's, Colitis

Heavy Antibiotic Use Tied to Development of Crohn's, Colitis

The more antibiotics that seniors take, the greater their risk of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), a new study suggests.

The findings could help explain some of the increase in Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis (common types of IBD) among older adults, according to the study authors.

"In older adults, we think that envi...

  • By Robert Preidt HealthDay Reporter
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  • May 13, 2022
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Nurses Key to Spotting Postpartum Depression in New Moms

Nurses Key to Spotting Postpartum Depression in New Moms

Nurses can be trained to detect postpartum depression in new mothers and could be crucial in spotting the condition early, researchers report.

Postpartum depression affects about 15% of new moms and can cause persistent sadness, fatigue, feelings of hopelessness and worthlessness, and trouble sleeping or eating. Some women with the condit...

  • By Robert Preidt HealthDay Reporter
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  • May 13, 2022
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'Human Cell Atlas' Maps 1 Million Cell Types in 33 Organs

'Human Cell Atlas' Maps 1 Million Cell Types in 33 Organs

An international research effort has unveiled the most extensive reference map yet of individual cells within the human body, knowledge that could revolutionize the study of health and disease.

The massive Human Cell Atlas contains detailed maps of more than one million individual cells across 33 organs and systems, researchers announced t...

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • May 12, 2022
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Nerve Gas Sarin Probably Caused Gulf War Syndrome

Nerve Gas Sarin Probably Caused Gulf War Syndrome

THURSDAY, May 12, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- After 30 years, researchers believe they finally have definitive evidence of the primary cause of Gulf War syndrome: exposure to low levels of the nerve gas sarin.

Gulf War syndrome is blamed for leaving a quarter million veterans of the 1991 conflict with a disabling array of l...

  • Amy Norton HealthDay Reporter
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  • May 12, 2022
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Underwear That Guards Against STDs During Oral Sex? FDA Says Yes

Underwear That Guards Against STDs During Oral Sex? FDA Says Yes

The first underwear meant to protect against sexually transmitted infections during oral sex was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Thursday.

Lorals -- which are available as bikinis or shorties -- are made of vanilla-flavored latex about as thin as condom material and form a seal on the inside of the thigh to keep fluid...

  • By Robert Preidt HealthDay Reporter
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  • May 12, 2022
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'Tragic Milestone': 1 Million American Lives Lost to COVID-19

'Tragic Milestone': 1 Million American Lives Lost to COVID-19

It's a number many Americans have grimly expected but may still find hard to comprehend: Over one million of their fellow citizens killed by COVID-19.

"Today, we mark a tragic milestone: one million American lives lost to COVID-19," President Joe Biden remarked in a speech posted Thursday morning on the White House website. "One million em...

  • Ernie Mundell HealthDay Reporter
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  • May 12, 2022
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AHA News: College Athletes Rarely Develop Heart Problems One Year After Having COVID-19

AHA News: College Athletes Rarely Develop Heart Problems One Year After Having COVID-19

College athletes who contract COVID-19 and return to playing sports have a low risk of developing life-threatening heart problems, according to new research that suggests stringent cardiac testing isn't necessary.

The research, published Thursday in the American Heart Association journal Circulation, followed up on a related 2021 study tha...

  • By American Heart Association News HealthDay Reporter
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  • May 12, 2022
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Long COVID May Be Chronic, Require Anti-Inflammatory Meds: Study

Long COVID May Be Chronic, Require Anti-Inflammatory Meds: Study

New evidence suggests that long COVID patients suffer rampant inflammation that wracks the entire body -- and that easing that inflammation could be key to saving their lives.

Severe systemic inflammation during hospitalization for COVID increases the risk of dying within a year after the patient seemingly recovers, University of Florida r...

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • May 12, 2022
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Are 'Climate-Friendly' Options on Restaurant Menus Coming Soon?

Are 'Climate-Friendly' Options on Restaurant Menus Coming Soon?

THURSDAY, May 12, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- Is there a way to make eating out more environmentally friendly? A team of German researchers thinks the answer is a bright green yes.

They'd like restaurants to offer menus that clearly label the environmental impact -- or "carbon footprint" -- of specific meal options.

...

  • Alan Mozes HealthDay Reporter
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  • May 12, 2022
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Major Head Trauma May Up Risks for Dementia

Major Head Trauma May Up Risks for Dementia

People who've had a major traumatic brain injury (TBI) may be at increased risk for dementia, according to a new study.

"Approximately 1 in 10 people in our study who had major TBI did develop dementia," said study co-author Dr. Rahul Raj, of the University of Helsinki in Finland.

A major TBI was defined as bleeding in the brai...

  • By Robert Preidt HealthDay Reporter
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  • May 12, 2022
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