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20 Oct

Teenagers Are Quitting HS Sports Due to Body Image Concerns Driven by Social Media

More teens are quitting HS sports saying they don’t look right for the sports based on what they see in the media and social media, according to a new study.

19 Oct

COVID-19 Linked to Increased Risk of Guillain-Barré Syndrome, a Rare but Serious Autoimmune Disorder, New Study Finds

In a new study, participants recently infected with COVID-19 were six times more likely to develop Guillain-Barré syndrome, where the immune system attacks the nerves.

18 Oct

Adult ADHD Linked to Increased Risk of Dementia

A new study finds adults with ADHD are nearly 3 times more likely to develop dementia compared to those without the condition.

Colon Cancer Under 50: Know Your Risks and How to Prevent It

Colon Cancer Under 50: Know Your Risks and How to Prevent It

SATURDAY, Feb. 24, 2024 (HeathDay News) -- Colon cancer rates are on the rise among young Americans and Americans of color, so much so that the disease is now the leading cause of cancer death for men under 50 and the second most deadly cancer for women under 50.

The American Cancer Society released those statistics in its 2024 Report, cau...

  • Ernie Mundell HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 24, 2024
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Young Workers' Injuries Rise After Recreational Marijuana Sales Made Legal

Young Workers' Injuries Rise After Recreational Marijuana Sales Made Legal

After states legalize the sale of weed for recreational use, on-the-job injuries rise among younger workers, new research shows.

U.S. Bureau of Labor statistics for 2006 through 2020 show that legal “recreational marijuana sales were associated with a 10% increase in workplace injuries among individuals aged 20 to 34 years,” the study ...

  • Ernie Mundell HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 23, 2024
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How to Keep the 'Ozempic Effect' Going: Exercise

How to Keep the 'Ozempic Effect' Going: Exercise

An open question for weight-loss drugs like Ozempic, Wegovy and Zepbound has been whether folks will keep the pounds off when they stop taking them.

Regular exercise could be the key to quitting the drugs without regaining weight, a new Danish study says.

“It is actually possible to stop taking the medication without large weight r...

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 23, 2024
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Florida Surgeon General Defies CDC Guidance Amid School Measles Outbreak

Florida Surgeon General Defies CDC Guidance Amid School Measles Outbreak

Amid an outbreak of measles at a Florida elementary school, the state's surgeon general has defied federal health guidance and told parents it's up to them whether they want to keep their unvaccinated child home to avoid infection.

In a letter to parents of children attending Manatee Bay Elementary school in Weston, where six cases of meas...

  • Robin Foster HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 23, 2024
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Poll Shows Strong Support Among Black Voters for Menthols Ban

Poll Shows Strong Support Among Black Voters for Menthols Ban

Black voters support a ban on menthol cigarettes by a wide margin, refuting claims that such a ban would be strongly opposed by Black Americans, a new survey shows.

Black voters support by a 37-point margin the menthol ban proposed by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, with 62% in favor and 25% against.

That’s even greater than...

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 23, 2024
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Is a 'Universal' Snake Venom Antidote Near?

Is a 'Universal' Snake Venom Antidote Near?

A “universal” antivenom can block the lethal toxins in the venoms of a wide variety of poisonous snakes found in Africa, Asia and Australia, researchers report.

The antibody protected mice from the normally deadly venom of snakes like black mambas and king cobras, according to findings published Feb. 21 in the journal Science Tran...

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 23, 2024
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AI Outperforms Eye Docs in Managing Glaucoma

AI Outperforms Eye Docs in Managing Glaucoma

FRIDAY, Feb. 23, 2024 (HealthDay news) -- Artificial intelligence can match and even outperform human eye doctors in diagnosing and treating glaucoma, a new study finds.

The GPT-4 system from OpenAI did as well or better than ophthalmologists in assessing 20 different patients for glaucoma and retinal disease, researchers report Feb. 22 in...

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 23, 2024
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Microplastics Found in Human Placentas

Microplastics Found in Human Placentas

Microscopic bits of plastic have been found lodged in tissues in much of the human body, and new research shows they are also infiltrating the placenta.

All samples of placental tissue take from 62 women were shown to contain microplastics, a team at the University of New Mexico (UNM) reports.

Concentrations ranged widely -- anywher...

  • Ernie Mundell HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 23, 2024
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1 in 3 Trans Masculine People Taking Testosterone Can Still Ovulate: Study

1 in 3 Trans Masculine People Taking Testosterone Can Still Ovulate: Study

A third of trans masculine people who have undergone testosterone therapy and have stopped menstruating are still ovulating, a new study suggests.

That means they remain at risk for an unwanted pregnancy, despite the absence of periods, Dutch researchers concluded.

It's not clear why ovulation ceases for some transgender people under...

  • Ernie Mundell HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 23, 2024
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School Lockdown Drills Help Students Feel Safer: Study

School Lockdown Drills Help Students Feel Safer: Study

Lockdown drills have become a shudder-inducing part of American life, preparing kids to lie low and keep quiet if a gunman chooses to roam their school.

But a new study finds these drills help children who’ve been exposed to violence, helping them feel safer at school.

The findings contradict claims that drills traumatize children ...

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 23, 2024
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Food-Focused Toddlers at Higher Risk for Eating Disorders as Teens

Food-Focused Toddlers at Higher Risk for Eating Disorders as Teens

Toddlers who are really into their food might have a higher risk of developing an eating disorder once they enter adolescence, a new study shows.

Kids ages 4 and 5 with a strong urge to eat when teased with tasty food appear more likely to report a range of eating disorder symptoms by ages 12 to 14, researchers report Feb. 20 in The La...

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 23, 2024
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Wendy Williams Diagnosed With Frontotemporal Dementia

Wendy Williams Diagnosed With Frontotemporal Dementia

Former talk show host Wendy Williams has been diagnosed with primary progressive aphasia and frontotemporal dementia, her representatives announced in a statement on Thursday.

The conditions are the same diagnoses actor Bruce Willis received in 2022; his aphasia later progressed to frontotemporal dementia.

Williams' team said the ...

  • Ernie Mundell HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 22, 2024
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U.S. Safety Protocols Stopped TB in Imported Lab Monkeys From Spreading to Humans

U.S. Safety Protocols Stopped TB in Imported Lab Monkeys From Spreading to Humans

Rigorous safety protocols prevented an outbreak of tuberculosis last year in lab monkeys imported to the United States from spreading to humans, a new report shows.

Overall, 26 cynomolgus macaque monkeys flown in from Southeast Asia to the United States for research purposes were confirmed to be infected with the Mycobacterium orygis <...

  • Ernie Mundell HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 22, 2024
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Protecting Yourself From Winter Weather Injuries

Protecting Yourself From Winter Weather Injuries

Falls, frostbite, fractures: They are all potential hazards of icy winter conditions. But experts say there's a lot you can do to avoid injury when snowflakes fall.

First, stay warm.

According to the New York City Department of Health, people lose the bulk of their body heat through their heads, so scarves, hats and ...

  • Ernie Mundell HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 22, 2024
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Don't Use Smartwatches That Claim to Measure Blood Sugar, FDA Warns

Don't Use Smartwatches That Claim to Measure Blood Sugar, FDA Warns

Some Americans living with diabetes are using smartwatches and smart rings that claim to be able to track their blood sugar.

However, such claims from any device that does not pierce the skin are fraudulent and potentially dangerous, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration warned in an advisory issued Wednesday.

Don't be fooled, the ...

  • Ernie Mundell HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 22, 2024
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Jill Biden Announces $100 Million for Research on Women's Health

Jill Biden Announces $100 Million for Research on Women's Health

First Lady Jill Biden on Wednesday announced $100 million in federal funding to fuel research into women's health.

“We will build a health care system that puts women and their lived experiences at its center,” Biden said in a White House news release announcing the initiative. “Where no woman or girl has to hear that ‘it’s all i...

  • Robin Foster HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 22, 2024
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Want to Boost Your Preschoolers' Language Skills? Reminisce With Them

Want to Boost Your Preschoolers' Language Skills? Reminisce With Them

Talking about the “good old days” might elicit eye rolls from teenagers, but it could be the key to boosting a preschooler’s language skills, a new study finds.

Reminiscing about past events with preschoolers presents young kids with high-quality speech as good as or better than sharing a book or playing with toys, researchers discov...

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 22, 2024
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Families of Infertile Men Face Higher Cancer Risks

Families of Infertile Men Face Higher Cancer Risks

A deficiency or absence of viable sperm in a man's semen could spell danger for him and those closely related to him, new research suggests.

Cancers are more likely to occur in these men and their families, reports a team led by Dr. Joemy Ramsay, an assistant professor at Utah University in Salt Lake City.

The exact link between canc...

  • Ernie Mundell HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 22, 2024
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Dirty Air Could Be Raising Your Alzheimer's Risk

Dirty Air Could Be Raising Your Alzheimer's Risk

People exposed to high levels of traffic-related air pollution are more likely to have more amyloid plaques in their brain, a condition associated with Alzheimer’s disease, a new study finds.

Seniors were nearly twice as likely to have more amyloid plaques if, in the year before their death, they lived in places with high concentrations ...

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 22, 2024
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Nearly 4 in 10 Americans Know Someone Who's Died From Drug Overdose

Nearly 4 in 10 Americans Know Someone Who's Died From Drug Overdose

More than two in every five Americans know someone who’s died from a drug overdose, a new study shows.

The study highlights the heavy toll that the U.S. opioid epidemic has taken on the nation, researchers say.

“The experiences and needs of millions of survivors of an overdose loss largely have been overlooked in the clinical and...

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 22, 2024
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