Get Healthy!

Results for search "Aging: Misc.".

Health News Results - 301

Another Pandemic Harm: Seniors May Have Higher Risk of Falling

Older Americans already face a higher risk of falls, but the decline in physical activity during the pandemic may have made matters worse, a new survey suggests.

More than a third of the 2,074 U.S. adults aged 50 to 80 who took part in the online survey in January reported a decline in physical activity in the first 10 months of the pandemic, and 27% said their physical conditioning -- fl...

Just 250 Fewer Calories Per Day Brings Big Health Rewards for Obese Seniors

Seniors, it may be easier than you think to undo the damage of decades of bad eating and precious little exercise.

New research shows that cutting just 250 calories a day and exercising moderately could lead to not only weight loss but improved vascular health in older obese adults.

These lifestyle changes may help offset age-related increases in aortic stiffness, which is a measure...

Deaths From Alzheimer's Far More Common in Rural America

FRIDAY, July 30, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Death rates from Alzheimer's disease are particularly high in the rural United States, a preliminary study finds, highlighting a need for health care resources in traditionally under-served areas.

Researchers discovered that over the past two decades, rural areas in the Southeast have seen the highest death rates from Alzheimer'...

Seniors Rarely Discuss Their Drinking With Their Doctors

Plenty of seniors may struggle with problem drinking, but a new study shows that less than half of them discuss their alcohol use with their health care providers.

"Older adults are at high risk for the harms of alcohol use, especially for those with existing chronic disease and who take prescribed medications," said lead study author Pia Mauro. That makes "discussions about alcohol with ...

Want to Avoid Dementia? Add Some Color to Your Plate

THURSDAY, July 29, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Something as simple as having a glass of orange juice in the morning or an apple at lunch could be one of the keys to protecting your brain health.

People who consumed just a half serving a day of foods high in a naturally occurring compound called flavonoids had a 20% lower risk of mental decline, according to a ne...

More Than Half of Americans Plagued by Back, Leg Pain

There's much Americans may disagree on, but many share one thing in common: chronic pain.

More than half of U.S. adults suffer from pain, with backs and legs the most common sources, according to researchers from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS).

Overall, the investigators found that nearly 59% of American men and wo...

Money Can Buy Americans Longer Life: Study

Money may not buy happiness but new research suggests it may at least help Americans live longer.

"Our results suggest that building wealth is important for health at the individual level, even after accounting for where one starts out in life," said Greg Miller, a faculty fellow at Northwestern University's Institute for Policy Research, in Chicago. "So, from a public health perspective,...

1 in 20 Cases of Dementia Occurs in People Under 65

WEDNESDAY, July 21, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Dementia is largely a disease of old age, but a new study finds that up to 5% of all cases are among people in the prime of their lives.

Looking at 95 international studies, researchers estimated that nearly 4 million people worldwide are living with young-onset dementia -- cases that strike between the ages of 30 and 64.

...

How Long Do People Want to Live?

What's better -- a long life or quality of life?

New research suggests that people balance both when thinking about their desired life span, and fears of suffering dementia or chronic pain in old age tend to limit how long they want to live.

"Dementia tops the list of conditions where people would prefer to live shorter lives -- which is a particular challenge given the rapid incr...

Reading, Puzzles May Delay Alzheimer's by 5 Years: Study

THURSDAY, July 15, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- An active mind in old age may delay Alzheimer's disease by up to five years, a new study suggests.

Activities like reading, writing letters, playing cards or doing puzzles may prolong brain health even for those in their 80s, researchers say.

"The key element is that you're processing information," said lead researcher R...

Urinary Incontinence Can Affect a Woman's Mental Health

Millions of women are plagued by the daily disruptions of urinary incontinence, and new research suggests it might also be harming their mental health.

For the study, researchers analyzed data from 10,000 adult women who took part in a Portuguese Health Ministry survey conducted every five years. Overall, one in 10 reported having urinary incontinence, but the rate was four in 10 among wo...

Missing Teeth, Higher Odds for Dementia?

Brushing and flossing is good not only for your teeth: It might also benefit your brain, a new study suggests.

The findings showed that tooth loss is tied to an increased risk of dementia, though getting dentures may help reduce that risk.

For the study, New York University researchers analyzed 14 studies that included more than 34,000 older adults and nearly 4,700 with diminished t...

Living to Age 130:  New Study Projects It Could Happen

How long can a human live? New research predicts there's a chance that someone in the world will celebrate a 130th birthday in this century.

There's been a steady rise in the number of people living beyond 100 years in recent decades, with up to nearly half a million worldwide, researchers noted.

The world's oldest known person was Jeanne Calment of France, who was 122 when she died...

Most Cases of Dementia in U.S. Seniors Go Undiagnosed: Study

Most Americans with dementia are undiagnosed, which shows how important it is to screen and assess seniors for the disease, researchers say.

Their new analysis of data from a nationwide survey of about 6 million Americans aged 65 and older revealed that 91% of people with cognitive impairment consistent with dementia did not have a formal medical diagnosis of dementia or Alzheimer's disea...

On Father's Day, Give Dad Tips to Keep Healthy

Men tend to put their health care last, but Penn State Health offers some tips this Father's Day for ensuring guys stay healthy in the future.

"Men tend to take care of their cars more frequently than they do themselves. But when men wait to see the doctor once their 'check engine' light comes on, they suffer major health problems that could've been prevented," said Dr. Eldra Daniels. He...

Could a Type of Statin Raise Dementia Risks?

Certain cholesterol-lowering drugs might speed dementia in some older adults whose memories are starting to fail, a small, preliminary study suggests.

The researchers found that of 300 older adults with mildly impaired thinking and memory, those using "lipophilic" statins were more likely to develop dementia over the next eight years.

Lipophilic statins include such widely used medi...

Old Age No Bar to Successful Heart Transplant, Study Finds

People over 70 are far less likely to be considered for or to receive a new heart -- even though new research suggests their survival rates after transplant are similar to those of younger patients.

For the study, the researchers analyzed data on more than 57,000 adults (aged 18 and older) listed as heart transplant surgery candidates in the United States between January 2000 and August 2...

Are Adults With Cerebral Palsy Getting the Therapies They Need?

U.S. adults with cerebral palsy aren't getting adequate physical therapy, according to a new study.

While they're more likely than other adults in community-living situations to have debilitating pain from musculoskeletal disorders, those with cerebral palsy receive significantly less physical therapy, a Michigan Medicine-University of Michigan team found.

For the study, the researc...

Amazon Tribe Could Hold Key to Health of Aging Brains

A native South American population that lives a pre-industrial lifestyle may have a slower rate of brain aging than the typical Westerner, a new study finds.

The study focused on the Tsimane population, whose roughly 16,000 members dwell in a remote part of the Bolivian Amazon. They live by farming, hunting, gathering and fishing - a lifestyle devoid of processed food, couch time and stre...

Osteoporosis Might Also Raise a Woman's Odds for Hearing Loss

It's a connection most women may not be aware of, but a new study suggests osteoporosis may raise your risk of hearing loss, and the drugs often used to treat thinning bones won't lower that risk.

According to researcher Dr. Sharon Curhan, data from her team's new study suggests that "osteoporosis and low bone density may be important contributors to aging-related hearing loss."

Tha...

Too Much TV May Dull the Aging Brain

Mom always said too much TV would rot your brain, and as with so many other things it appears she was right.

Middle-aged folks who regularly turn to TV for entertainment appear to have a greater risk of decline in their reasoning and memory later in life, three new studies suggest.

Researchers found that even moderate amounts of TV viewing were associated with worse performance on c...

A Healthier Heart Might Make You Smarter

In new evidence that illustrates that health issues rarely exist in a vacuum, a new study finds a link between heart health and brain function.

Existing evidence suggests that having heart disease raises one's risk of dementia, and vice versa, but a team of researchers based in London wanted to find out if this connection could be seen in a healthier population.

For the study, nearl...

Should There Be 'Gun Retirement' for the Elderly?

Just as some elderly drivers need to give up their car keys, older gun owners may eventually face "firearm retirement." And a preliminary study suggests they are open to the idea.

In focus-group interviews with older gun owners, researchers found that many had considered putting limits on their firearm access -- though they usually hadn't yet laid out plans for when and how.

It's an...

Boys Born Very Prematurely May Age Faster as Men

Boys who weigh less than 2 pounds at birth don't age as well as their normal-weight peers, a long-term study finds.

Canadian researchers have followed a group of extremely low birth weight (ELBW) babies and their normal-weight counterparts since 1977.

When participants were in their early 30s, researchers compared the genes of 45 who were ELBW babies with those of 47 whose birth w...

Feel Younger Than Your Age? You Might Live Longer

Can feeling young at heart, or at least younger than your actual age, help older people live healthier, longer lives?

Yes, according to researchers in Germany.

"Individuals who feel younger than they chronologically are seem to benefit from their younger subjective age in various aspects," explained study lead author Markus Wettstein.

Surveying more than 5,000 middle-aged adu...

Road to Healthy Middle-Aged Brain May Begin in Childhood

Could having heart disease risk factors in childhood sow the seeds of thinking declines in middle-age?

It looks like it might, new research claims.

"I think it was not so big of a surprise for us, but maybe for the scientific community who have been focusing mainly on the midlife risk factors and old-age cognition," said study co-author Suvi Rovio. She is senior researcher of cardio...

Failing Kidneys Could Bring Higher Dementia Risk

Chronic kidney disease may carry an increased risk of dementia, according to a Swedish study.

In people with chronic kidney disease, the bean-shaped organs gradually lose their ability to filter waste from the blood and eliminate fluids.

"Even a mild reduction in kidney function has been linked to an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and infections, and there is growing evide...

Dementia Risk Rises as Years Lived With Type 2 Diabetes Increases

The younger people are when they develop type 2 diabetes, the higher their risk of dementia later in life, a new study suggests.

Many studies have pointed to links between diabetes and higher dementia risk. Experts say it's likely because diabetes can harm the brain in a number of ways.

Now, the new findings suggest that younger people with diabetes may be at particular risk down th...

'Light Therapy' Could Help Brain-Injured Veterans Struggling With PTSD

A popular treatment for the seasonal depression that strikes during dark winter months may also benefit veterans with traumatic brain injuries and post-traumatic stress disorder, a small pilot study suggests.

Results from 16 older veterans found that bright light therapy alongside traditional treatments for these problems improved physical and mental symptoms.

The therapy, in which...

Higher Education Won't Help Preserve the Aging Brain: Study

That college degree may be useful in many ways, but new research suggests it probably won't keep your brain from shrinking with age.

Over the years, a number of studies have suggested that education might buffer people against age-related declines in memory and thinking. But those findings did not prove a cause-and-effect relationship.

In the new study, researchers asked whether peo...

Common Complication of Pregnancy Tied to Higher Stroke Risk Later

Having preeclampsia during pregnancy significantly increases a woman's future risk of stroke, researchers say.

Preeclampsia happens when a woman with previously normal blood pressure suddenly develops high blood pressure, protein in her urine or other problems after 20 weeks into pregnancy. The condition occurs in about one in 25 pregnancies in the United States, according to the U.S. C...

Your Zip Code Could Help or Harm Your Brain

Where you live could affect your brain health as you age, a new study claims.

Specifically, it found that middle-aged and older people in poorer neighborhoods showed more brain shrinkage and faster mental decline than those in affluent neighborhoods.

""Worldwide, dementia is a major cause of illness and a devastating diagnosis," said study author Dr. Amy Kind, of the University of W...

Assisted Living Centers Can Do More for Dementia Patients, Experts Say

U.S. assisted living facilities often have activities to keep seniors socially engaged -- but a new study says they need to ensure that residents with dementia are not left out.

Researchers observed residents and staff at four assisted living communities over the course of a year.

They found that a few factors stood out as key to keeping residents with dementia socially and mentally...

Why So Many New Cancer Diagnoses When Americans Turn 65?

A few years ago, Dr. Joseph Shrager, a professor of cardiothoracic surgery at Stanford University School of Medicine, noticed that lung cancer diagnoses were noticeably higher at age 65 than at slightly older or younger ages.

"There was no reason rates should differ much between the ages of 63 and 65," Shrager said.

He discussed this with his colleagues, who said they were seeing so...

Will High-Protein Diets Help the Middle-Aged Build Muscle?

Middle-aged adults looking to boost their muscle mass do not need to bulk up on protein, a new study suggests.

Researchers found that 10 weeks of strength training plus a moderate amount of protein were enough to build muscle in previously sedentary middle-aged people. And extra protein brought no added gains.

The findings run counter to a common belief among exercisers, said resear...

Nearly All Seniors Take Meds That Raise Their Odds of Falling

Among older Americans, deaths from falls are up sharply, dovetailing with a surge in use of medications that increase the risk of falling, researchers say.

Two decades ago, about 57% of U.S. seniors took medications that increased their risk of falls. By 2017, that number had risen to 94%, and deaths caused by falls had more than doubled, a new study found.

The medications are meant...

Some Folks Do Age Slower Than Others

People really do vary in how fast they age, and the divergence starts in young adulthood, a new study suggests.

The researchers found that by the tender age of 45, people with a faster pace of "biological aging" were more likely to feel, function and look far older than they actually were. And that relative sprint toward old age began in their 20s.

The findings, the study authors sa...

Alzheimer's Patients Are Being Given Too Many Meds

Many older adults with dementia are prescribed dangerous combinations of drugs that raise their risk of overdose, falls and further mental deterioration, a new study finds.

About 1 in 7 people with dementia living outside of nursing homes are taking three or more drugs that act on their brain and nervous system, researchers reported.

The most troubling combinations involved opi...

The Skinny on Wrinkle-Free Skin

Wrinkles may be a natural part of getting older, but you can slow your skin's aging with changes to your lifestyle and environment, a skin expert says.

"Daily activities, such as protecting your skin from the sun and eating healthy foods, can go a long way in preventing your skin from aging more quickly than it should," dermatologist Dr. Michele Green said in an American Academy of Dermat...

Mediterranean Diet Could Keep Aging Brains Sharp

Helping your brain stay sharp with age may be as simple as changing up the food on your plate at dinnertime, a new study suggests.

The study focused on the healthy "Mediterranean" diet, a regimen reliant on olive oil, beans, nuts, fruits, vegetables and whole grains, with chicken and fish largely replacing red meat. Dairy products and eggs are only used in "low to moderate amounts," accor...

History of Mental Illness Tied to Earlier Onset of Alzheimer's Disease

People with Alzheimer's disease often have a history of depression or anxiety, which might mean an earlier emergence of memory and thinking problems, a preliminary study suggests.

Researchers found that of 1,500 Alzheimer's patients at their center, 43% had a history of depression, while almost one-third had a history of anxiety disorders.

Those patients also tended to be diagnosed ...

'Night Owls' Perform Worse at Work, Study Finds

"Early to bed, early to rise" may be good advice for your career. New research finds that, compared to night owls, folks with earlier bedtimes perform better at work and are less plagued by disabilities that lead to early retirement.

Overall, "night owls" were twice as likely as "early birds" to underperform at work, the new study found. Folks who stayed up late also ran a heightened risk...

Guys, Exercise Will Boost Your Aging Hearts, Testosterone Won't: Study

Testosterone levels tend to fall in older men, but a new study shows that exercise -- and not supplemental testosterone -- is the way to rejuvenate the aging male heart.

Australian researchers found that without exercise, testosterone replacement therapy offered patients no improvement at all in cardiovascular health. But exercise alone -- absent any testosterone supplementation -- di...

Why Some 'Super Ager' Folks Keep Their Minds Dementia-Free

Researchers may have uncovered a key reason some people remain sharp as a tack into their 80s and 90s: Their brains resist the buildup of certain proteins that mark Alzheimer's disease.

The study focused on what scientists have dubbed "super agers" -- a select group of older folks who have the memory performance of people decades younger.

Compared with older people who had average b...

New Hope for Better Treatments Against Macular Degeneration

A number of new treatments for age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a progressive eye disease, are under development. AMD is a leading cause of vision loss in older people.

About 11 million Americans have AMD, which affects part of the eye that allows you to see fine detail. There are two types: wet and dry. Wet AMD is treated with eye injections every month or two, and dry AMD with an...

Too Little Sleep Could Raise Your Dementia Risk

Older adults who get little sleep each night may be at heightened risk of dementia or earlier death, a new study suggests.

Researchers found that among 2,600 older Americans, those who were deemed "short sleepers" -- catching no more than five hours of sleep at night -- were more likely to develop dementia or die over the next five years.

Their risks were double that of older people...

Does 'Prediabetes' Lead to Full-Blown Diabetes? Age May Be Key

Few older adults with prediabetes will actually go on to develop type 2 diabetes, new research concludes.

The surprising finding suggests that while prediabetes is a useful predictor of diabetes risk in young and middle-aged adults, that's not the case in older folks.

"Our results suggest that for older adults with blood sugar levels in the prediabetes range, few will actually devel...

Being Frail Greatly Raises COVID-19 Death Risk: Study

Severe frailty significantly increases the risk of death in COVID-19 patients, British researchers say.

In their new study, the investigators analyzed data from more than 5,700 COVID-19 patients at 55 hospitals in 12 countries. They found that those who were severely frail were three times more likely to die than those who weren't frail.

That increased risk was independent of age, a...

Why Adding on a Few Pounds as You Age Might Be Good for You

Putting on a few extra pounds in your 50s may add years to your life -- if you start off at a normal weight and your weight gain doesn't tip into obesity, a new study suggests.

But two outside experts cautioned that the findings are not a license to pack on the pounds, as study participants who started off obese and continued to gain weight over the years were actually least lik...

Fat Loss in Face Does Make Folks Look Older: Study

It's not just sagging that ages a face, but loss of fat under the skin as well, according to a new study.

The findings could help plastic surgeons give their patients a more natural look, the study authors said.

For the study, researchers analyzed CT scans of the faces of 19 people, taken at least a decade apart.

The study participants were an average age of 46 at the time of ...