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01 Mar

Social Media Linked to Increase in Tic Severity During COVID-19 Pandemic

Increased social media use may be causing more severe tics in young people, researchers find

Health News Results - 105

'Virtual' Museum Visits Are Good Medicine for Seniors

By combining technology with interactive art activities, older people at home can have museums come to them -- and this can support their physical, mental and social well-being, a new study reports.

"This participatory art-based activity could become a model that could be offered in museums and arts institutions worldwide to promote active and healthy aging," said lead author Dr. Olivier...

Looking for Reliable Hay Fever Advice? It's Probably Not on YouTube

Need information about hay fever? Steer clear of YouTube, a new study advises.

Researchers found misinformation about allergic rhinitis, the medical name for the disorder, in a large numbers of posts on the popular video-sharing site.

That's significant, because 7 in 10 patients wi...

Skip the Texts: Face-to-Face Meetings Make College Students Happier

In a world where everyone spends more and more time with eyes fixed on their phones, new research suggests young people feel happier after socializing with friends in person rather than virtually.

The conclusion is an outgrowth of nearly four years spent analyzing how social habits of more than 3,000 college students affected their state of mind.

"The findings of

  • Alan Mozes HealthDay Reporter
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  • August 4, 2022
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  • 'Social Contagion' Isn't Causing Adolescents to Become Trans, Study Finds

    A "social contagion" theory that suggests teens, and girls in particular, are being influenced by their peers to become transgender is baseless, a new study finds.

    “The hypothesis that

  • By Robin Foster and Cara Murez HealthDay Reporters
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  • August 4, 2022
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  • Tweets Show Americans Eating Healthier in Pandemic

    Whether it's fact or brag, tweets suggest people ate healthier during COVID lockdowns and restaurant closures, a new study finds.

    Tweets about healthy foods rose 20% between May 2020 and January 2021, while those about fast food and alcohol dropped 9% and 11%, respectively, researchers found.

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    Social Media Has Big Impact on People Taking Up Smoking, Vaping

    The potent influence of social media may include tobacco use.

    By analyzing 29 previously published studies, researchers found that people who viewed social media that contained tobacco content were more than twice as likely to report using tobacco and were more likely to use it in the future, compared to those who never v...

    Facebook, Instagram Take Down Posts Offering Abortion Pills

    Facebook and Instagram have started taking down posts that offer abortion pills to women who may not be able to get them after the Supreme Court's reversal of Roe v. Wade.

    These posts told women how to get

  • By Steven Reinberg HealthDay Reporter
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  • June 28, 2022
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  • More Cyberbullying, More Suicidal Thoughts Among Teens: Study

    Adolescents who experience cyberbullying are more likely to think about suicide, a new study shows.

    Researchers found a link between being bullied online, through texts or on social media, and thoughts of suicide that go above and beyond the link between suicidal thoughts and traditional offline bullying.<...

    Want Reliable Diet Advice? Don't Head to TikTok

    A new study warns that the social media giant TikTok is filled with confusing and wrong information about the heart-healthy, plant-based approach to eating dubbed the Mediterranean diet.

    For the study, researchers analyzed 200 videos posted to the platform last August. They were the first to pop up on a search for content tagged #mediterraneandiet. By definition, that tag, or label, sugge...

    Week Off Social Media Boosts Mental Health: Study

    It's no secret that too much social media can be bad for one's mental health. Now, research suggests that taking even a brief break from TikTok, Facebook, Instagram and Twitter can ease symptoms of depression and

  • Steven Reinberg HealthDay Reporter
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  • May 11, 2022
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  • Teens on TikTok: Fun, But Addictive and Maybe Harmful

    In the fall of 2021, TikTok announced a major milestone to coincide with its fifth anniversary: The amassing of roughly 1 billion global users, many of them young, turning to the app every month as a way to view, make and share bite-sized videos.

    But what exactly do those young users think of the app? Is it a boon to their self-esteem and creativity, or an addictive time-waster that crea...

    Who Are the New 'Patient Influencers' on Social Media?

    Disability activist Gem Hubbard regularly shares her insights about life in a wheelchair with more than 75,000 Instagram followers, under the handle @wheelsnoheels_, and her YouTube videos boast more than 3.7 million hits.

    Hubbard, who hails from the U.K., is "increasingly known internationally for her work in furthering the horizons of people with and without disabilities,"

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • April 15, 2022
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  • Does Social Media Harm Kids? It Might Depend on Their Age

    Your child's risk of harm from social media is higher at certain ages and it's different for girls and boys, researchers report.

    To figure out how social media use affected "life satisfaction" among 10- to 21-year-olds, the investigators analyzed long-term data on 17,400 young people in the United Kingdom.

    The

  • By Robert Preidt HealthDay Reporter
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  • March 29, 2022
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  • U.S. Surgeon General Investigates COVID-19 Misinformation

    An investigation into health misinformation on COVID-19 has been launched by U.S. Surgeon General Dr. Vivek Murthy.

    "Misinformation has had a profound impact on COVID-19 and our response," Murthy told CNN. "Studies have demonstrated that the vast majority of the American public either believes common myths about COVID-19 or thinks those myths might be true. And many of those incl...

    Is Pandemic Social Media Use Worsening Tic Disorders in Teens?

    For reasons that remain murky, new research warns that a spike in social media use during the pandemic might have worsened tic disorders in children.

    Tics are sudden twitches, movements or sounds that people do repeatedly because they can't control their body.

    In the study, 90% of 20 tic patients aged ...

    Loneliness Can Be Unhealthy Heartbreaker for Older Women

    It's a fate many older women fear: loneliness and isolation as they age. Now, new research suggests those feelings may also predispose them to heart disease.

    The findings may be especially relevant now because of social distancing required by the pandemic.

    "We are social beings. In this time of COVID-19, many people are experiencing

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  • February 7, 2022
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  • Crowdfunding for Medical Costs Almost Always Fails

    You have almost certainly seen the pleas while scrolling through social media: Called crowdfunding, folks try to raise money to pay for their sick loved one's mounting medical bills.

    But new research shows these grassroots campaigns rarely raise enough money to make a difference.

    According to GoFundMe, which corner...

    U.S. Teens Were Already in Mental Health Crisis Before Pandemic Hit

    MONDAY, Jan. 24, 2022 (HealthDay Now) -- Alaina Stanisci has grappled with an eating disorder since she was 10, and the disruptions of the pandemic only made things worse for the high school senior.

    "I actually experienced a relapse at the beginning of the pandemic because of this lack of structure," Stanisci, 18, of Mountain Lakes, N.J., said during a HealthDay Now interview. "D...

    Many Marijuana Vendors Aim Advertising at Kids: Study

    Some recreational pot shops are using tricks from the old playbooks of alcohol and tobacco companies to target underage users on social media, a new study reports.

    Despite state laws restricting such marketing, researchers found marijuana retailers on social media promoting their wares with posts that:

    • Featured cartoon characters like Snoopy, SpongeBob SquarePants, and Rick and...

    Celebrities' Social Media Promotes Junk Food, Often for Free

    Images of people eating and drinking are a staple of social media, but new research finds such posts from celebrities often puts the spotlight squarely on junk food.

    Profit isn't always the reason why, investigators found: Celebrities often highlight unhealthy food favorites without getting paid for it.

    "Ninety-five percent of photos that contain foods and beverages on celebrities' ...

    Worried About Your Teen's Social Media Use? Experts Offer Help

    Is your teen staring at their smartphone all day? There's many things parents can do to protect kids from the potentially negative effects of social media, experts say.

    While there are positive aspects to social media, there's evidence it can pose risks to teens' mental health due ...

    Zoom Meeting Anxiety Doesn't Strike Everyone

    The pandemic has made Zoom meetings a daily reality for millions. For many, having to watch their own face in a meeting is the worst part.

    But that's not true for everyone, new research shows.

    "Most people believe that seeing yourself during virtual meetings contributes to making the overall experience worse, but that's not what showed up in my data," said study author Kristine Kuh...

    Parents Underestimate How Much Time Teens Spent Online During Pandemic

    Parents, think you have a good handle on how much time your teens are spending on social media?

    Don't bet on it. New research suggests your best guesstimate is likely way off.

    Parents significantly underestimated their teens' social media use -- especially girls' -- during the first year of the COVID-19 pandemic, the study showed.

    "Although most parents and their teens spent ...

    'You Didn't Tag Me!' Instagram Snubs Hurt, Study Confirms

    Think what happens online stays online? Think again.

    According to new research, a social media diss can leave people feeling genuinely hurt and ostracized.

    "Social media ostracism means being excluded or ignored online on social media networks like Instagram, Facebook or Twitter," explained lead study author Christiane Büttner. She's a PhD candidate in the department of social psy...

    Social Media Tied to Higher Risk of Depression

    The latest in a spate of studies investigating links between use of social media and depression suggests the two go hand in hand.

    "The relationship between social media and mental health has been the subject of a lot of debate," said Dr. Roy Perlis, lead author of the new study. He's director of the Center for Experimental Drugs and Diagnostics at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston....

    Singer Selena Gomez to Launch Mental Health Platform

    A new mental health media platform meant to connect people with educational resources and reduce the stigma around mental illness is planned by pop star Selena Gomez and her partners.

    Wondermind is set to launch in February 2022 and will include mental health experts sharing their expertise, and daily exercises that people can do to strengthen their mental health, CNN reported.

    Teen Social Media Posts About Cutting, Other Self-Harm Are Soaring

    American teens are increasingly turning to the social media giant Instagram to share graphic images of their own attempts to harm themselves, a new study reveals.

    "It could be an attempt to share their emotional or psychological pain with others or find support from others," said study lead author Amanda Giordano. She is an associate professor of counseling and human development services ...

    Alzheimer's Diagnosis May Come With Big Cost to Social Life

    Alzheimer's is a devastating disease, slowly robbing patients of their memories and even their sense of selves.

    Now, new research shows it also robs sufferers of a healthy social life.

    "Social relationships are an essential feature of our quality of life and can buffer against cognitive decline," said study co-author Addam Reynolds, a doctoral candidate at the Rutgers School of Soci...

    U.S. Adolescents' Daily Screen Time Doubled During Pandemic

    As teens dramatically stepped up their screen time during COVID-19 lockdowns, their well-being took a hit, a new study reveals.

    Recreational screen time among U.S. teens doubled from before the pandemic to nearly eight hours per day during the pandemic, according to the report. And this estimate doesn't include time spent on screens for remote learning or schoolwork, so the total was like...

    Death Threats, Trolling Common for Scientists Who Speak to Media About COVID

    Doctors who discuss COVID-19 in the media frequently face abuse and harassment, including threats of death or violence, a new report reveals.

    More than two-thirds of experts surveyed have experienced trolling or personal attacks after speaking about COVID-19 in media interviews, a worldwide survey of more than 300 scientists found.

    Further, a quarter said such harassment is a freque...

    Facebook Became Emergency Network During Early Days of Pandemic

    In a health emergency, social media giants like Facebook can be both quagmires of misinformation and sources of social support and reliable guidance, a small, new study suggests.

    Researchers surveyed 32 Facebook users weekly for eight weeks. All were asked about their online experiences during March and April 2020, when COVID-triggered lockdowns unfolded.

    The Facebook users -- ...

    After an ICU Stay, Social Support Crucial for Seniors' Survival

    Older adults who are socially isolated are more likely to experience serious disability or die after a stay in the intensive care unit (ICU), new research reveals.

    "This important research finding sheds light on a crucial health care issue that has become more dire during the COVID-19 pandemic," said Dr. E. Albert Reece, dean of the University of Maryland School of Medicine, in Baltimore....

    College Freshmen Drank Less as Pandemic Began

    Here's an unexpected silver lining to the pandemic: New research shows there was a decline in overall drinking and binge drinking among U.S. college freshmen during the early months of the new coronavirus' spread across America.

    "We found that social factors, like social distancing and reductions in social support from friends, were associated with decreases in alcohol use among first-yea...

    Bogus Info on Cancer Common Online, and It Can Harm

    Don't believe everything you read on social media about cancer and cancer treatment.

    A new study finds that one-third of the most popular articles on social media about treatment for common cancers contains misinformation -- and most of it can be downright dangerous.

    "The worst-case scenario is when it leads to a person declining proven cancer treatments in favor of a treatment tha...

    Healthy Living Can Lower Your Odds for Alzheimer's

    Alzheimer's disease has no cure, but one expert says it may be possible to reduce the risks of developing the disease with healthy lifestyle changes.

    There are two different types of Alzheimer's. Early-onset typically affects patients before age 65. Late-onset affects older adults.

    "Early-onset dementia often is linked to genetics and can run in families," said Dr. Chen Zhao, a neur...

    Not Ready for Post-Pandemic Mingling? Expert Offers Tips to Ease Anxiety

    While some people may be ready and eager to reconnect with family and friends at social gatherings post-pandemic, it's OK to feel apprehensive.

    As restrictions loosen because infection rates are plummeting and more people are getting vaccinated, many people are experiencing feelings that they didn't expect -- such as anxiety about returning to social situations, according to a psych servi...

    Your Teen's Smartphone Could Be Key to Unhealthy Weight

    Your teens' route to a healthy or unhealthy weight may be in their hands -- literally.

    New research out of South Korea shows that teens who spend too much time on their smartphones are also more prone to eating habits that increase their odds for obesity.

    One nutritionist who helps treat obesity in the young wasn't surprised by the findings.

    "Spending hours on end on your phon...

    Bots Blamed for COVID Misinformation on Facebook

    Bots, not individual users, drive much of the COVID-19 misinformation on Facebook, according to a new study.

    Bots are large numbers of automated accounts controlled by single users.

    "The coronavirus pandemic has sparked what the World Health Organization has called an 'infodemic' of misinformation," said study leader John Ayers, a scientist who specializes in public health surveilla...

    Debunking Social Media Myth, Study Finds COVID Vaccine Won't Harm Placenta

    Contrary to misleading reports spread on social media, a new study finds the COVID-19 vaccine does no damage to the placenta in pregnancy.

    In a study of placentas from patients who were vaccinated for COVID-19 during pregnancy, researchers found no evidence of any harm.

    "The placenta is like the black box in an airplane. If something goes wrong with a pregnancy, we usually see chan...

    Alcohol Is No Friend to Social Distancing

    Maintaining adequate social distance from strangers -- a key COVID-19 preventive measure -- can be tough when you're drinking alcohol, researchers say.

    In a new study, the researchers put more than 200 young social drinkers in different social situations in laboratory settings. They drank either alcoholic or nonalcoholic beverages.

    In half of the cases, participants drank with a fri...

    Feeling Down? Support Via Social Media May Not Be Enough

    Looking for a morale boost or some solid encouragement? If so, socializing the old-fashioned way -- live and in-person -- will likely do more to lift your spirits than online interactions, new research suggests.

    It's the key takeaway from a survey of more than 400 college undergraduate students.

    "We wanted to see if the social support provided over social media was associated with b...

    What's for Lunch? Often, It's What Your Co-Workers Are Having

    Everyone has probably heard the expression "you are what you eat," but do you eat what you want, or do you follow the crowd?

    New research suggests that what people have at lunch is influenced by the friends or coworkers who they are dining with. And this is true whether they're making healthy choices or unhealthy ones.

    "We found that individuals tend to mirror the food choices of ot...

    You & Your Friends Are Vaccinated. So Why Is Socializing Again Scary?

    Heather Gould, a wedding planner in Sonoma, Calif., always had some social anxiety.

    Before the pandemic, she'd feel queasy and think twice about going out. But Gould would power through, talking her way through industry events and client meetings without tipping off her insecurities.

    But now, after more than a year of interacting only with her closest friends and family, the challen...

    Making E-Cigs Cool: Singers, Models in Music Videos Get Teens Vaping

    DJ Khaled, Halsey and other musicians are selling electronic cigarettes to young people through product placement in music videos that receive hundreds of millions of views, a pair of new studies report.

    Overall, music videos identified as featuring e-cigarette product placements during a four-month period in 2018 received more than 1.6 billion total views on YouTube, researchers report i...

    Boys Who Spend Lots of Time Online More Likely to Cyberbully

    Here's yet another reason to keep your teenager from spending countless hours online and on popular social media: New research suggests it increases cyberbullying, particularly among teen boys.

    "There are some people who engage in cyberbullying online because of the anonymity and the fact that there's no retaliation," said lead investigator Amanda Giordano. She is an associate professor...

    When Facebook, Twitter Flag Posts as 'Unverified,' Readers Listen

    Readers pay attention when social media sites label an article as "unverified" or "suspicious," a new study suggests.

    But how an article is presented -- including author credentials and writing style -- doesn't affect readers' views about its credibility.

    The findings show that big tech companies such as Facebook and Twitter have a responsibility to combat the spread of misleading a...

    As Social Media Time Rises, So Does Teen Girls' Suicide Risk

    As the amount of time young teenage girls spend glued to Instagram, TikTok and other social media sites goes up, so does their long-term risk for suicide, a new study warns.

    The finding stems from a decade spent tracking social media habits and suicide risk among 500 teenage boys and girls, the longest such effort to date, the study authors said.

    "We found that girls who started usi...

    Crowdsourcing Raises Billions for Families Hit Hard by Medical Bills

    You have probably seen the social media posts: Your good friend's co-worker is raising money online to help pay for cancer treatments or another friend needs funds to pay medical bills after a car crash.

    Crowdsourced fundraising seems to, at least partly, fill a gap between out-of-pocket health care costs and what people can afford.

    A new study looked at what the role of one of the ...

    Facebook Posts Big Drivers in Vaccine Resistance, Study Finds

    As Americans await their COVID-19 shot, a new study of a different vaccine shows the power of Facebook posts in fueling "anti-vax" resistance to immunization.

    The study included more than 10 years of public Facebook posts on the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine. It found that nearly 40% of 6,500 HPV vaccine-related posts from 2006 to 2016 amplified a perceived risk. The data suggest the...

    1 in 4 Doctors Harassed Online, Study Finds

    One in four doctors has been personally attacked or sexually harassed on social media, a new study finds.

    Women are more likely to be sexually harassed, while both men and women are attacked based on religion, race or medical recommendations, researchers say.

    Doctors received negative reviews, coordinated harassment, threats at work, public exposure of their personal information and...

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