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Guys, Take the Lead in Self-Checks for Testicular Cancer

Young men should become familiar with symptoms of testicular cancer and know how to do self-exams, an expert says.

Though testicular cancer accounts for less than 1% of all male cancers in the United States, it typically occurs in men between the ages of 20 and 34. Cure rates are near 95%, especially when the cancer is detected early.

"Some men might be nervous or uncomfortable with...

Almost 90,000 Young American Adults Will Get Cancer This Year: Report

Nearly 90,000 Americans between 15 and 39 years of age will be diagnosed with cancer this year and more than 9,200 will die, a new report projects.

One hematologist who deals with younger cancer patients said the shock of a diagnosis at this point in their lives can be overwhelming.

"This population is unique, they're in the prime of their lives," said Dr. Tina Bhatnagar, w...

Mother and Son Draw Hope, Healing From Shared Cancer Treatment

Families bond over lots of shared experiences -- but one Leslie Seigel and her adult son, Josh, never expected to share was battling cancer.

Soon after Leslie finished chemotherapy for an aggressive form of breast cancer, however, Josh found himself waging his own battle with testicular cancer.

The mother and son soon learned they shared something else -- a genetic mutation ...

'Less Is More' When it Comes to Testicular Cancer Chemo, Study Suggests

Treatment with half the typical amount of chemotherapy can still prevent the return of one type of testicular cancer, a new study suggests.

Giving patients with the "non-seminoma" form of testicular tumor just one cycle of chemotherapy was just as effective at preventing the cancer from coming back as the standard two cycles, the study found.

Cutting the amount of chemother...

Testicular Cancer Treatment Unlikely to Trigger Birth Defects

New research should reassure dads-to-be who've had testicular cancer that treatment with radiation or chemotherapy doesn't raise the risk of fathering babies with birth defects.

"Our research set out to investigate whether treatment for the most common cancer among young men leads to a higher risk of fathering a child with a birth defect and we saw no increased risk associated with ca...

Baby Monkey May Offer Hope to Preserving Fertility of Kids With Cancer

She's cute, and perhaps a medical breakthrough.

Scientists say they have used frozen testicular tissue to achieve the birth of a healthy baby monkey named Grady -- a success they hope to eventually translate to childhood cancer survivors whose treatment has left them infertile.

Infertility is a potential side effect of the chemotherapy and radiation used to treat various can...

Testicular Cancer Treatment Doesn't Always Doom Fertility

Young men diagnosed with testicular cancer often worry that treating the disease may jeopardize their chances of having children, but new research should ease their minds.

In the study, sperm counts rebounded in men who received one course of chemotherapy or radiation therapy after surgery for early-stage testicular cancer.

It was known that several rounds of chemotherapy or...

Testicular Cancer a Bigger Threat to Young Men

Testicular cancer occurs most often in young men, and they need to know the signs of the disease, a urologist says.

Testicular cancer is relatively rare -- about 9,000 new cases will be diagnosed this year in the United States -- but it is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in males aged 15 to 40.

It's a highly treatable disease, especially when diagnosed early, according to...