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14 Jun

Steps You Can Take To Keep Your Heart Healthy

There are steps you can take to lower your chances of developing heart disease.

Health News Results - 157

Too Much Niacin May Be Bad for the Heart

Niacin is an essential B vitamin, but new research reveals that too much of it may harm your heart.

Found in many foods that millions of Americans eat, excessive amounts of niacin can trigger inflammation and damage blood vessels, scientists report in the Feb. 19 issue of the journal Nature Medicine.

"The ave...

Blood Test Helps Predict Future Heart Attacks

A standard blood test can reveal whether a person is at high risk of having a heart attack within six months, a new study shows.

Researchers identified dozens of biomarkers in blood linked to the risk of a first heart attack, according to a report published Feb. 12 in the journal Nature Cardiovascular Research.

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High Blood Pressure in Pregnancy  Tied to Long-Term Heart Trouble for Hispanic Women

Hispanic women who experience spikes in blood pressure while pregnant may also face higher heart risks years later, new research shows.

These "hypertensive disorders of pregnancy" (HDP) -- conditions such as preeclampsia, eclampsia and gestational hypertension -- may even have a greater role to play in certain heart risks than regular high blood pressure, the researchers noted.

“...

Wegovy Cuts Heart Risks by 20% in Large Trial

MONDAY, Nov. 13, 2023 (Healthday News) -- In a finding that could change the landscape of heart disease care, the wildly popular weight-loss drug Wegovy has proved its mettle in protecting the heart after lowering the risk of cardiac problems in patients by 20%.

The results from this large, international study had been eagerly awaited by scientists and doctors alike. Why? It is the first ...

Easy-to-Wear ECG Patch Tracks Heart Health

A new, more comfortable wearable electrocardiogram (ECG) device could be on its way.

Researchers from Australia and India have created a compact, lightweight, gel-free hexagonal-shaped ECG patch that they say is ideally suited for point-of-care diagnostics.

For those at risk, having a wearable device that can detect heart problems and assess overall cardiac health can save lives.

You Survived a Heart Attack. Here's How Cardiac Rehab Can Help

Cardiac rehabilitation is a key part of recovery from a heart attack, helping to prevent another, perhaps more severe one.

About 800,000 people in the United States have a heart attack every year, about one-quarter of whom have already had a heart attack, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

But research has found that participating in cardiac rehab...

Have Sleep Apnea? CPAP Machine May Help Save Your Life

Millions of people who suffer from sleep apnea go to bed at night with a motorized device called a CPAP machine.

Now, two new studies confirm the treatment has significant benefits not just on quality of sleep, but also for keeping people's hearts healthy.

Together, the studies may offer more reasons to endure the not-always-comfortable treatment known as continuous positive...

Opening All Arteries Best When Heart Attack Strikes in Old Age: Study

After a heart attack, elderly adults have better odds for improved health and survival if all major heart vessels are cleared, not just the one that caused the heart attack.

Because these patients often have other medical conditions and may be frail, doctors frequently opt to open only the "culprit" blood vessel and leave other partially blocked vessels alone.

But new research...

U.S. Heart Disease Death Rates Have Fallen Sharply in Past 30 Years

Fatal heart disease in the United States dropped about 4% a year between 1990 and 2019, but Americans need to quit smoking, drinking and overeating or those gains could be wiped out, according to new research.

The declining rates of fatal heart disease have stalled, according to the research from Rutgers University-New Brunswick in New Jersey.

“The overall numbers are good. We sa...

Sleep Apnea Lowers Blood Oxygen, Upping Heart Risks

Sleep apnea may increase the risk of heart attack and stroke as erratic breathing causes oxygen levels to drop, new research shows.

"These findings will help better characterize high-risk versions of obstructive sleep apnea," said co-author Ali Azarbarzin, director of the Sle...

Daily Baby Aspirin Raises Odds for Brain Bleeds, With No Lowering of Stroke Risk

For years, older adults took a baby aspirin a day to help ward off a first-time heart attack or stroke. Now yet another study is showing the risks are not worth it for most.

Specifically, researchers found the risk of brain bleeding while using low-dose aspirin outweighed any potential benefit against stroke for relatively healthy older adults -- that is, those with no history of heart di...

Hot, Polluted Days May Double Heart Attack Risk

The extreme heat and choking wildfire smoke blanketing wide swaths of the United States this summer are actively dangerous to heart health, a new study reports.

Days where soaring heat combines with fine particulate air pollution can double a person's risk of a fatal heart attack, researchers have found.

“Heat wave exposure interacts synergistically with fine particulate pollution...

New Heart Implant Monitors, Treats -- and Then Dissolves Away

An experimental implant now under development could serve as a temporary monitor and pacemaker for ailing heart patients -- then dissolve away when it's no longer needed.

The soft, lightweight and transparent implant is about the size of a postage stamp, and is made of polymers and metals that are biodegradable, researchers reported July 5 in the journal

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • July 7, 2023
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  • New High-Tech CT Might Expand Heart Imaging

    The benefits of noninvasive imaging may soon be available to patients at high risk of coronary artery disease, according to researchers studying a newer technology.

    That technology is called ultra-high-resolution coronary CT angiography.

    Currently, patients have coronary CT angiography (CCTA), which is highly effective for ruling out coronary artery disease when it's used in patient...

    Stress, Anxiety Plague Many Who Get Implanted Heart Devices

    New research finds that many of those who have received an implanted cardiac device to extend their life also have mood disorders, including anxiety, depression and PTSD.

    “Implantable cardioverter defibrillators [ICDs] are effective at extending patients' lives, but we need to make sure that's a good quality life,” said study author

    Testosterone Therapy Safe for Low-T Men at Risk of Heart Trouble

    Testosterone replacement therapy is safe for most men with heart problems who also have been diagnosed with a low testosterone disorder, a new clinical trial has concluded.

    The trial found that testosterone replacement did not raise these patients' incidence of heart attack, stroke or heart-related death in a group of men with both heart problems and hypogonadism -- a condition in which l...

    Cancer Survivors Who Keep Smoking Have Double the Risk for Heart-Related Death

    Quitting smoking after a cancer diagnosis can deliver a big payoff for another major health concern: the risk of heart attack or stroke.

    Cancer patients who kept smoking had a nearly doubled risk of either of those emergencies, as well as death from cardiovascular disease, new research showed.

    “A cancer diagnosis is an extremely stressful life event, which often leads to significa...

    Do All Heart Attack Survivors Need Long-Term Beta Blocker Meds?

    It's standard for heart attack survivors to take beta blocker medications for years afterward, but a new study suggests that may be unnecessary for people who've had a milder heart attack.

    Researchers found that among heart attack survivors whose hearts still had normal pumping ability, there was no added benefit from using beta blockers for more than one year. They were no less lik...

    Surviving a Heart Attack in Younger Years Could Be Even Tougher on Women

    Women who have a heart attack at a younger age tend to have worse outcomes and are more likely to return to the hospital than their male counterparts.

    More significant underlying risk factors could be why, according to new research.

    Researchers called for greater public awareness around heart attacks in young women, including the unique symptoms they experience and the care they nee...

    Hidden Heart Disease Can Raise Your Odds for Heart Attack 8-Fold

    Millions of middle-aged folks may be walking around with no symptoms of heart disease, and yet they still face a higher risk for a heart attack, new research shows.

    What gives? Subclinical or silent heart disease may be responsible. This is the early thickening or hardening of the heart arteries that can worsen over time and cause crushing chest pain, known as angina, or even a heart...

    Highlighting Link Between Flu & Heart Trouble Can Nudge Folks to Get Vaccine

    Flu kills more than 500,000 people globally each year and leads to heart problems for many others. Publicizing those potential cardiac ills may spur folks to get their annual flu vaccine, researchers say.

    Danish researchers who studied vaccination messaging methods said the two best ways to get people to roll up their sleeves were either a simple reminder or by noting the link between con...

    Getting Rehab at Home After Heart Attack Can Extend Lives

    After a heart attack, home rehab can literally be a lifesaver, a new study finds.

    Taking part in a home-based cardiac rehabilitation program lowered the risk of dying from heart complications by 36% within four years, compared with patients who were not in a rehab program, researchers report.

    "Cardiac rehabilitation programs save lives," said lead researcher

  • Steven Reinberg HealthDay Reporter
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  • March 1, 2023
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  • Insomnia Brings Big Spike in Heart Attack Risk: Study

    Folks who have trouble falling or staying asleep may be more likely to have a heart attack.

    This is the main takeaway from new research linking insomnia to heart woes. Specifically, people with insomnia were 69% more likely to have a heart attack than folks without the sleep disorder. These rates were even higher among people with both diabetes and insomnia, the study showed.

    “Ins...

    Aidan's Tough Journey: Now Breathing Easier With a Rewired Heart

    Ambar Marcus didn't think anything of going to the follow-up ultrasound her doctor recommended around 22 weeks of pregnancy — until she noticed how long it was taking.

    “The technician was a lovely lady who chatted with me the whole time, but I noticed it felt like a very long appointment,” Marcus, who lives in Silver Spring, Md., recalled. “This is definitely the longest echo I've...

    'Holiday Heart':  Heart Attacks Spike in Last 2 Weeks of December

    The holiday season is filled with to-do lists, but one should rise to the top: Take care of your heart.

    Whether from stress, cold weather or falling out of good habits in terms of eating, sleeping and drinking, heart attack rates spike as much as 40% between Christmas and New Year's, according to cardiologist

  • Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • December 19, 2022
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  • Shoveling Snow Is a Heart Hazard: Protect Yourself

    As yet another winter blizzard barrels down on the U.S. East Coast, the the American Heart Association (AHA) is cautioning people to take care when shoveling snow, since the exertion and the cold can cause serious heart problems.

    Many people, especially those who don't exercise regularly, may face an increased risk of a heart attack or sudden cardiac arrest after shoveling heavy snow, ac...

    Even Early-Stage Liver Disease May Be Harming the Heart

    Liver disease can affect heart health and that includes even early forms of the disease, a new study reveals.

    While it had previously been known that nonalcoholic fatty liver disease was associated with cardiovascular death, the relationship was poorly understood, said researcher Dr. Alan Kwan. He is a c...

    Shingles Ups Odds of Stroke, Heart Attack By Almost 30%

    People who've had a bout of shingles may face a heightened risk of heart attack or stroke in later years, a new, large study suggests.

    Anyone who ever had chickenpox can develop shingles — a painful rash that is caused by a reactivation of the virus that causes chickenpox. About one-third of Americans will develop shingles in their lifetime, according to the U.S. Centers for Diseas...

    Winter Holidays Are High Time for Heart Attacks: Protect Yourself

    The winter holidays are a time of celebrating and sharing precious time with family and friends, but they can also be deadly: More people die of heart attacks on Christmas Day than on any other day of the year.

    Experts aren't certain what's behind that troubling fact, but they offer some suggestions to help ensure that you and your loved ones aren't among them.

    "The holidays are a ...

    Black Patients Fare Worse Than White Patients After Angioplasty, Stents

    Black adults who undergo a common procedure to open up clogged arteries are readmitted to the hospital more often than their white peers. They're also more likely to die in the years after treatment, a new study finds.

    Researchers looked at how patients fared following balloon angioplasty and coronary stenting -- "one of the most common cardiovascular procedures performed in the U.S....

    Getting Your Gums Cleaned Could Mean Better Outcomes After Heart Attack

    While dental and medical care are thought to be related, researchers wondered what impact oral care might have on a serious heart condition.

    A University of Michigan team studied more than 2,000 patients who had a heart attack in 2017. The patients had either received periodontal care, dental cleanings or no or...

    Lupus, MS and Other Autoimmune Disorders Raise Heart Risks

    Research has linked heart disease to specific autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and lupus. Now, a huge study shows that autoimmune diseases as a group increase your chances of developing heart ills.

    Autoimmune diseases such as psoriasis, multiple sclerosis, lupus erythematosus and type 1 diabetes occur when the body engages in friendly fire against its own organs, tissues, ...

    With Smartwatch, Cardiac Rehab at Home May Work Best

    A new smartwatch could be a key player in preventing heart attacks among people suffering from risky heart conditions, a new study claims.

    Using the smartwatch to track their heart health, patients in a home-based cardiac rehab program were more than 20% less likely to land in the hospital t...

    Gout Flare-Ups Could Raise Heart Risk for Weeks After

    When gout flares up, the joint pain is often excruciating. But that's not the only worry tied to this common inflammatory arthritic condition.

    A new British study warns that gout flares double the risk for heart attack or

    Black, Hispanic Patients Less Likely to Get Crucial Care After Heart Attack

    When they suffer a heart attack, Black and Hispanic patients in the United States receive subpar care compared with white patients, new research reveals.

    The study of more than 87,000 insured heart attack patients found that Blac...

    Just 1 in 4 Patients Get Rehab After Heart Attack, Cardiac Surgery

    Medically supervised exercise programs can do heart patients a lot of good, but few people of color take part in them -- regardless of income, new research finds.

    The study, of more than 100,000 U.S. patients, found that while all were eligible for cardiac rehabilitation, only...

    Boomers Sicker Than Their Parents Were at Same Age

    There's some discouraging news for baby boomers.

    Americans born between 1948 and 1965 are more likely than the generations that preceded them to have multiple health problems as they age, a new study shows.

    And, many develop ...

    No Sign 1 Year of Testosterone Supplements Cause Heart Trouble: Study

    One year of testosterone therapy for men with low levels of the hormone does not appear to increase their risk for heart problems, British researchers found.

    "We were unable to find evidence ... that testosterone increases risks of mortality or cardiovascular and/or cerebrovascular [heart and/or stroke] events in the short- to medium-term in men with low testosterone," said study leader D...

    Limiting TV to Under 1 Hour a Day Could Slash Heart Disease Rates: Study

    It's tempting to binge-watch TV shows, and it might be hard to get off the couch after just one or two episodes.

    But it could be worth it.

    Researchers calculated that if people committed to watching just under an hour of TV a day, 11% of coronary heart disease cases could be eliminated.

    Thoug...

    Lower Incomes May Mean Lower Survival After Heart Attack

    If you're poor and have a severe type of heart attack, the chance you'll live through it is significantly lower than that of someone with more money, new research shows.

    The finding underscores the need to close a divide in health care that hits low-income people hard, said lead researcher Dr. Abdul...

    For Smokers With Heart Trouble, Quitting Equals the Benefit of 3 Meds: Study

    Quitting smoking can give heart disease patients nearly five additional years of life without heart problems, according to a new study.

    "Kicking the habit appears to be as effective as taking three medications for preventing heart attacks and strokes in those with a prior heart attack or procedure to open blocked arteries," said study author Dr. Tinka van Trier, of Amsterdam University Me...

    Will a Little Drinking Help Your Heart? Maybe Not

    If you believe an occasional tipple is good for your heart, a new study may make you reconsider the notion.

    Some previous research has suggested that light drinking may benefit the heart, but this large study concluded that any amount of drinki...

    Smartwatch Heart Data May Be Less Accurate for Black Users

    Millions of Americans use smartwatches or fitness trackers to check on their heart rate, but the accuracy may fall short for people of color, a new research review finds.

    The analysis, of 10 published studies, found that in four of them, wearable devices were clea...

    Rise in Blood Pressure Upon Standing Could Signal Danger

    If your blood pressure spikes when you stand, you may be at increased risk for heart attack and stroke, Italian researchers warn.

    "The results of the study confirmed our initial hypothesis - a pronounced increase in blood pressure from lying to standing could be prognostically important in young people with high blood pressure," said lead study author Dr. Paolo Palatini. He is a professor...

    Mammograms Can Also Highlight Heart Risks: Study

    Your annual screening mammogram may do more than spot breast cancer early - it may give you a heads up on your heart disease risk, too.

    Digital breast X-rays can also detect a build-up of calcium in the arteries of your breasts, an early sign of heart disease. These white ...

    Trouble Paying Bills Could Mean Worse Outcomes After Heart Attack

    A healthy bank account pays dividends after a heart attack, with new research indicating severe financial strain increases survivors' risk of death.

    Researchers analyzed data from nearly 3,000 people, 75 and older, whose health was tracked after they suffered a heart attack.

    "Our research indicates the i...

    Heart Risks Double for People With Bipolar, Schizophrenia

    People with serious mental illness have up to double the risk of heart disease, and should have their heart health monitored from a young age, a new study finds.

    Specifically, those mental health issues are bipolar disorder, schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder.

    "Previous research has indicated that people diagnosed with a serious mental illness die 10-20 years earlier than t...

    Even Washing Dishes Helps an Older Woman's Heart

    You don't need to run marathons or sweat it out on your indoor bike to boost your heart health.

    This is the main message of a new study that found everyday household activities including dishwashing, gardening and cooking also count when it comes to helping older women reduce their risk for heart disease...

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