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Many Kids Separated From Families at U.S. Border Suffer PTSD

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 24, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Parents and children who were separated under the Trump administration's "zero tolerance" immigration policy have shown lasting psychological trauma -- even after being reunited, a new study finds.

Between 2017 and 2018, more than 5,000 children were separated from their parents at the U.S.-Mexico border under the policy, whi...

Mindfulness Can Boost Your Mindset After Cardiac Arrest

Shining a light on the powerful link between the mind and body, a new study suggests that cardiac arrest survivors who learn to focus their thoughts on the here and now during recovery are less likely to become depressed or anxious.

The finding centers on a mental health practice known as "mindfulness," which amounts to a sort of stop-and-smell-the-roses approach to life.

"Min...

PTSD Symptoms May Vary Throughout Menstrual Cycle: Study

Women's symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) may vary with their menstrual cycle, which could have implications for diagnosis and treatment, researchers say.

Their study included 40 women between 18 and 33 years of age who had PTSD after experiencing or witnessing a traumatic event, such as sexual violence or a serious injury.

"For women who are naturally cycling, it ma...

Neighborhood Gun Violence Means Worse Mental Health for Kids

Living within a few blocks of a shooting increases the risk that a child will end up visiting the emergency department for mental health-related problems, researchers say.

The new study found significant increases in mental health-related ER visits in the two weeks after a neighborhood shooting, especially among kids who lived closest to it and those exposed to multiple shootings.

"...

Equine Therapy: Horses Help Veterans Struggling With PTSD

As a Marine Corps veteran who served in both Iraq and Afghanistan, Matthew Ryba understands what life in a combat zone can do to soldiers' minds, leaving many struggling with post-traumatic stress disorder.

Now, new research shows that equine therapy might go a long way in starting the healing process for these veterans. In the program, participants learned about horses, stroking their si...

Why Losing Someone to Violence Can Be Especially Tough to Get Over

It can take years for a survivor of a traumatic event to recover from the loss of a loved one, new research shows, but treating the symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) early may help prevent what's called complicated grief.

"Grief is a normal response to the loss of someone close, but traumatic losses may severely harm survivors for years," said lead study autho...

Heading Back to the Workplace? Here's Some Tips to Help Re-Adjust

Freaked out about trading Zoom meetings and the privacy of working at home for a return to the office?

You've got plenty of company. As more workplaces reopen, stress about health risks and new routines is front and center.

The Center for Workplace Mental Health knows what you're are going through. The center, a program of the American Psychiatric Association (APA) Foundation, is of...

Wildfires Ravage Firefighters' Long-Term Physical, Mental Health

Roaring, fast-moving blazes. Choking smoke. Fiery tornados. Thunderstorms and lightning.

The Dixie Fire -- now the single largest wildfire in California history -- continues to spread, having burned through more than 750 square miles of forest land north of Sacramento.

The astonishing spread of smoke from the fire, causing discomfort and illness to people hundreds or thousands of mi...

PTSD Common After Sexual Assault, But Eases for Most

Most sexual assault survivors have post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) immediately after the attack, but it tends to lessen over the following months, a new study finds.

"One of the main takeaways is that the majority of recovery from post-traumatic stress happens in the first three months," said study lead author Emily Dworkin, an assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral scienc...

Massive Gene Study Probes Origins of Depression

Researchers who pinpointed 178 gene variants linked to major depression say their findings could improve diagnosis and treatment of a disorder that affects 1 in 5 people.

The study draws on a huge database, analyzing the genetic and health records of 1.2 million people from three databanks in the United States, the U.K. and Finland, and another databank from the consumer genetics company ...

Post-COVID PTSD? Many Find Return to 'Normal' Unsettling

Many Americans felt relief and joy at the announcement last week that fully vaccinated people no longer need to wear masks at many indoor and outdoor locations.

But don't be surprised if those good feelings come tinged with stress or worry: Mental health experts said in a HealthDay Now interview that the COVID-19 pandemic has left a lasting mark on people's psyches, and folks will be stru...

State of Mind Matters for Survival After Heart Attack

Poor mental health after a heart attack may increase young and middle-aged adults' risk of another heart attack or death a few years later, a new study suggests.

The study included 283 heart attack survivors, aged 18 to 61 with an average age of 51, who completed questionnaires that assessed depression, anxiety, anger, stress and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) within six months of ...

Time Spent in ICU Linked to Higher Odds for Suicide Later

Survivors of the intensive care unit (ICU) have a higher risk of self-harm and suicide after discharge than other hospital patients, a Canadian study shows.

Researchers compared the health records of 423,000 ICU survivors in the province of Ontario with those of with 3 million patients who were hospitalized but not in intensive care between 2009 and 2017.

Compared to others, ICU sur...

'Light Therapy' Could Help Brain-Injured Veterans Struggling With PTSD

A popular treatment for the seasonal depression that strikes during dark winter months may also benefit veterans with traumatic brain injuries and post-traumatic stress disorder, a small pilot study suggests.

Results from 16 older veterans found that bright light therapy alongside traditional treatments for these problems improved physical and mental symptoms.

The therapy, in which...

High-Profile Police Brutality Cases Harm Black Americans' Mental Health: Study

As America awaits a verdict in the Derek Chauvin trial, new research finds that such high-profile police killings of Black people may take a big mental health toll on psyches across the country.

Researchers found that, on average, Black Americans reported an increase in "poor mental health days" during weeks where more than one deadly racial incident was in the news.

Those incidents...

Stressed, Exhausted: Frontline Workers Faced Big Mental Strain in Pandemic

Doctors, nurses and other frontline health workers in U.S. emergency departments have struggled with significant mental health challenges during the COVID-19 pandemic, a new poll reveals.

"As the nation moves into what many believe is a fourth wave of COVID, this study is important to our understanding of the impact of the pandemic on the mental well-being of frontline medical personnel,"...

Nearly Half of U.S. Veterans Cited 'Personal Growth' During Pandemic: Survey

Could there actually be a mental health upside to the ongoing pandemic?

In a word, yes. At least that's the finding of a new survey, in which roughly four in 10 U.S. military veterans said that the experience has in some ways proven psychologically rewarding.

Nearly 3,100 veterans participated in the survey, which was conducted in two parts, one just before the pandemic and one a ye...

Mental Health 'Epidemic' Threatens Communities of Color Amid COVID-19

Communities of color face a burgeoning wave of mental health problems as a result of how the COVID-19 pandemic has changed the way people interact and grieve, experts warn.

"We're about to have a mental health epidemic because of COVID," Vickie Mays, a professor of health policy and director of the UCLA Center on Research, Education, Training and Strategic Communication on Minority Health...

Mental Health Trauma Plagues Wildfire Survivors

The 2018 wildfire that destroyed 239 square miles in Northern California, including the town of Paradise, left a lasting mental health crisis in its wake.

Many residents who survived the so-called Camp Fire are now grappling with chronic post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression, according to a new study in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Heal...

'Awareness' Under C-Section Anesthesia May Be Less Rare Than Thought

It's a woman's worst nightmare: You're having a C-section under anesthesia, but you suddenly become aware of what is happening during your surgery.

Now, a new study shows that phenomenon, known as "accidental awareness," is more common than believed. In fact, it may occur in 1 in 256 women who have obstetric surgery and some may suffer long-term psychological harm.

Accidental a...

COVID Fuels Depression Among Pregnant Women, New Moms

COVID-19 may be behind a concerning rise in the number of women suffering anxiety and depression before and soon after childbirth, a new study says.

Researchers from Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston surveyed more than 1,100 pregnant and postpartum women between May 21 and Aug. 17. They found that 36%, or more than 1 in 3, had significant levels of depression. Prior to the pandemic,...

Is the Pandemic Harming Kids' Mental Health?

FRIDAY, Nov. 13, 2020 (HealthDay) -- Since last April, hospital emergency rooms across the United States have seen a sustained surge in visits related to the mental health of school-aged kids, a new report reveals.

The findings suggest the COVID-19 pandemic is taking a toll on children because of disruptions to their everyday life, anxiety about illness and social isolation. That conclusi...

PTSD May Be Tied to Greater Dementia Risk

Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)may significantly increase the risk of dementia later in life, according to a new study.

The researchers found that people with a history of PTSD were up to two times more likely to develop dementia than those who never had PTSD.

"Our study provides important new evidence of how traumatic experiences can impact brain health, and how the l...

PTSD Therapy Doesn't Trigger Drug Relapse in Addiction Patients: Study

Talk therapy for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) doesn't appear to increase addiction treatment patients' risk of relapse, a small new study says.

Roughly a quarter of people with drug or alcohol use disorders also have PTSD, typically caused by a traumatic or stressful life event such as combat or rape.

Cognitive behavioral therapy is the leading PTSD treatment, but s...

New Leash on Life: How Dog-Walking Is Helping Veterans Battered by PTSD

Many soldiers experience traumas on the battlefield that leave them emotionally wounded, but something as simple as walking a dog might bring these veterans desperately needed psychic relief.

So suggests a new study where researchers compared how four weeks of walking with a shelter dog or with another person affected three biomarkers of stress in male and female veterans with post-tr...

Cyberbullies and Their Victims Can Both Develop PTSD

Both cyberbullies and their victims can suffer from symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), a new British study finds.

Cyberbullying is bullying online rather than in person. It's so pervasive that pediatricians should routinely ask their patients about it as part of psychological assessment, the researchers said.

"Parents, teachers a...

'Trigger Warnings' May Do More Harm Than Good, Study Finds

Trigger warnings are meant to alert trauma survivors about unsettling text or content that they might find potentially distressing.

But these words of caution at the start of films or books may provide no help at all -- and might even hamper a traumatized person's ability to grapple with deep psychological scars, a new study reports.

"We found that trigger warnings did not ...

AHA News: Looking for Ways to Protect Against Pandemic PTSD

As many places start to look forward to life after the first wave of the coronavirus, another type of illness could be about to follow in its wake.

"We're going to have many more mental health issues as time goes on," said Dr. Rima Styra, a psychiatrist at Toronto's University Health Network and associate professor of psychiatry at the University of Toronto. "And people will refer to it...

Mental Health is Big Issue For Police Officers  Around The World: Study

Mental health problems and substance abuse are common among cops, and more needs to be done to address those issues, researchers say.

Previous studies have suggested that first responders have a higher risk of mental health issues than the general public, but it wasn't clear how police officers were affected.

To learn more, researchers reviewed 67 studies that included more ...

PTSD May Plague Nurses, Especially in COVID-19 Era

Nursing is not a profession for the fainthearted, but new research shows that post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) can strike nurses, and suggests the new coronavirus may make things even worse for those on the front lines of the pandemic.

Though the study was conducted a year ago, the results are particularly timely as nurses around the world are treating millions of COVID-19 cases ...

Depression, Anxiety, PTSD May Plague Many COVID-19 Survivors

The ordeal faced by critically ill COVID-19 patients likely won't end even if they pull through and survive their life-threatening infection, experts fear.

Some of these survivors will be emotionally scarred by their time spent in an intensive care unit (ICU), and they are at increased risk of psychological problems, such as anxiety, depression and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD...

Sexual Victimization Persists in U.S. Military for LGBTQs: Study

Lesbian, gay and bisexual members in the U.S. military are at higher risk for sexual harassment, sexual assault and stalking, a new study reports.

And that sexual victimization can trigger mental health problems such as depression, post-traumatic stress disorder, substance use and suicidal behavior, researchers say.

They surveyed 544 active-duty U.S. service members, includi...

4 in 10 Security Guards Suffer PTSD, Study Finds

Many British security guards have post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) due to frequent verbal and physical abuse, researchers report.

Their interviews with 750 private security guards in the United Kingdom revealed that nearly 40% had symptoms of PTSD, and also that security guard companies provide them with little mental health support.

Another finding from the researc...

PTSD Can Take Heavy Toll on Hearts of Female Vets

PTSD can cause severe psychic distress, but it may also raise heart risks for female veterans in particular, a new study suggests.

"The association we found was incredibly strong," said lead author Dr. Ramin Ebrahimi, a cardiologist affiliated with the Veterans Affairs Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System.

"We have a rising number of women veterans, and a large proportion o...

Could Viagra, Cialis Work Largely by Placebo Effect?

Until the discovery of Viagra, men with erectile dysfunction were largely left with the impression that their sexual problems were all in their head.

That might still be somewhat true, even in this age of little blue pills, a new paper argues.

A good number of men receiving a placebo in clinical trials for erectile dysfunction drugs experienced an improvement in their functi...

Traumatic Brain Injuries Raise Risk of Psychiatric Ills in Soldiers

U.S. soldiers who suffer a moderate or severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) are more likely to suffer other mental health woes than those with other serious injuries, a new study finds.

It also showed that the rate of mental health disorders among seriously injured soldiers is much higher than previously reported.

"A central takeaway is that severe TBI is associated with a gr...

9/11 Study Shows PTSD Tied to Earlier Death

Survivors of the 2001 terrorist attack on New York City's World Trade Center who developed PTSD have a lasting risk of premature death, a new study finds.

The study of nearly 64,000 emergency responders and civilians found that the longer the post-traumatic stress disorder lingered, the more likely they were to die early from any cause.

Over 13 years of follow-up, more than...

Veterans' Tough Veneer May Influence PTSD Severity

Traits relating to traditional masculinity -- such as self-reliance and stoicism -- are associated with more severe and difficult-to-treat post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in military veterans, researchers say.

"Overall, we found that strict adherence to masculine norms was associated with more severe PTSD symptoms in veterans, but more detailed analysis suggests that the associa...

Online Bullies Make Teen Depression, PTSD Even Worse: Survey

Cyberbullying can worsen symptoms of depression and post-traumatic stress disorder in young people, new research shows.

That's the conclusion of a recent survey of 50 teens who were inpatients at a suburban psychiatric hospital near New York City. Researchers reported that those who had been bullied had higher severity of PTSD and anger than those who were not bullied.

"Even...

More Lasting Damage From Gun Violence Than Car Accidents

Gun violence appears to deliver more long-term damage to survivors than car crashes do.

"Our study shows that injury, and especially firearm injury, casts a long shadow over the lives of those who survive," said study author Dr. Juan Herrera-Escobar. He is research director of Long-Term Outcomes in Trauma in the Center for Surgery and Public Health at Brigham and Women's Hospital in B...

Trauma of Miscarriage May Trigger PTSD

Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) isn't confined to soldiers on the battlefield; it can happen to anyone after a traumatic event -- including pregnancy loss.

After a miscarriage or ectopic pregnancy, 1 in 6 women can have PTSD nearly a year later, European researchers report.

"Early pregnancy loss is associated with a significant level of psychological distress, and in...

Hong Kong Unrest Leaves Millions to Struggle With PTSD, Depression

As mass protests have swept across Hong Kong in recent months, a mounting mental health toll will be tough to tackle, new research suggests.

Surveys conducted over 10 years show there was a sixfold increase in the prevalence of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms among Hong Kong residents from shortly after Occupy Central in March 2015 (about 5%) to Sept./Nov. 2019 (ne...

Gunshot Survivors May Struggle With Emotional Aftermath for Years

Even years after a gunshot wound heals, shooting survivors may be at greater risk of alcohol abuse, drug abuse and unemployment, new research finds.

The study of more than 180 gunshot victims also found that nearly half appeared to have post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) years after the incident.

"The effects of gunshot injuries go beyond mortality statistics and function...

AHA News: Heart Attack Survivors Who Develop PTSD Don't Always Take Heart Meds

Experiencing a heart attack may be so terrifying that it triggers post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and those who develop PTSD have twice the risk of having a second heart attack.

That's according to new research that suggests this may be because PTSD keeps them from taking their cardiovascular medication.

Researchers electronically monitored medication adherence of 40...

Veterans Often Hit Hard by Deaths of Fellow Soldiers

As Americans pay tribute to all veterans who have served in the U.S. Armed Forces Monday, new research suggests that how comrades died can affect levels of grief among soldiers who served in Afghanistan and Iraq.

"Our goal was to better understand how combat veterans experience the deaths of their military comrades in battle or by suicide, and what factors predict the nature and leve...

PTSD Linked to Increased Risk of Stroke in Younger Adults

Young and middle-aged adults with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) have an increased risk of stroke, new research suggests.

For the study, researchers analyzed medical data from more than 1 million veterans who served in Iraq and Afghanistan. They ranged in age from 18 to 60 years and two-thirds were white.

Of those, 29% had been diagnosed with PTSD. None had previo...

Dogs Help Injured Vets Cope

A big floppy-faced St. Bernard saved the life of Army veteran and combat medic Brian Gliba -- but not in the way you might think.

Gliba first met Zeus in 2009 while battling post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and dealing with the medical havoc wrought by an IED blast he survived in Iraq.

Zeus' main job was to help Gliba remember to take the heavy doses of medication he re...

PTSD a Risk Factor for Ovarian Cancer?

Struggling with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) may make a woman more vulnerable to ovarian cancer, a new study suggests.

Researchers analyzed data from a national study of nearly 55,000 U.S. women and concluded that those who'd had six to seven symptoms of PTSD -- such as being easily startled by common noises or avoiding reminders of the traumatic experience -- at some point i...

AHA News: Understanding Connection Between Poverty, Childhood Trauma and Heart Disease

Traumatic childhood experiences among the poor and uninsured are associated with higher cardiovascular risk, according to new research.

Experts have long known difficult childhoods are linked with a wide range of health risks later in life, including obesity, substance abuse and cardiovascular disease.

They're also alarmingly common: More than half of the U.S. population s...

Brain Changes Noted in Holocaust Survivors and Their Children

Holocaust survivors may have suffered permanent harmful changes to their brain structure, and the brains of their children and grandchildren may also be affected, a small study reveals.

"After more than 70 years, the impact of surviving the Holocaust on brain function is significant," said researcher Ivan Rektor, a neurologist from Brno, Czech Republic.

MRI scans of 28 Holoc...