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Vials Found in Lab Contained Vaccine, not Smallpox Virus: CDC

There was no smallpox virus in frozen vials recently discovered at a vaccine research facility in Pennsylvania, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Thursday.

Instead of the variola virus that causes smallpox, lab tests showed that the vials contained vaccinia, the virus used in smallpox vaccine, according to the agency.

On Nov. 15, federal officials were alerted...

Vials With Smallpox Labels Found at Vaccine Lab in Pennsylvania: CDC

Several frozen vials that were labeled "smallpox" have been discovered in a vaccine research facility in Pennsylvania, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said.

There is no indication that anyone was exposed to what was in the vials, the agency noted.

The vials were found by a laboratory worker while cleaning out a freezer in a facility that conducts vaccine research...

CDC Investigating Case of Monkeypox in Traveler From Nigeria

A case of monkeypox in a traveler who returned to the United States from Nigeria is being investigated by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and the Maryland Department of Health.

The infected person is currently in isolation in Maryland.

Monkeypox is a rare but potentially serious viral illness that typically begins with flu-like symptoms and swelling of the lymph nodes, and then...

9-Year-Old Becomes 10th Casualty of Astroworld's Crowd Surge

A young boy who was injured at the Astroworld Festival in Houston has become the 10th person to die from a huge crowd surge at the event.

Ezra Blount, 9, was trampled at the festival and had been placed in a medically induced coma in an attempt to deal with severe brain, liver and kidney trauma, attorneys for his family said last week, CBS News reported.

"The Blount family ...

WHO, CDC Warn of Measles Threat After 22 Million Infants Miss Shots During Pandemic

The world faces an increased risk of a measles outbreak because 22 million infants did not get their measles shots last year due to the pandemic, the World Health Organization and U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention warned Wednesday.

They said that 3 million fewer infants were vaccinated against measles in 2020 than in 2019, and just 70% of infants received both doses of the t...

White House Sets Jan. 4 Deadline for Large, Private U.S. Companies to Mandate Vaccines

Large U.S. companies have until Jan. 4, 2022 to ensure their employees are fully vaccinated against COVID-19, the Biden administration said Thursday.

Unvaccinated workers must undergo weekly testing under the plan that applies to businesses with 100 or more employees and will cover 84 million private sector workers, the New York Times reported.

President Joe Biden first announced th...

One Attitude Keeps Many From COVID Vaccine, Study Shows

Why do some people refuse to get vaccinated or wear masks to prevent the spread of COVID-19? The biggest driver of that decision is a belief that the virus poses no threat to them, a new international study suggests.

The researchers said their findings could help guide efforts to fight future pandemics.

The investigators examined responses from more than 200,000 people in 51 countri...

Is Sheltering Under an Overpass Safe When Tornadoes Strike?

You're driving down the highway when a tornado warning is issued over your car radio. Is it safe to follow widespread advice and seek shelter under an overpass?

While the U.S. National Weather Service warns that the wind from a tornado can accelerate as it flows under the overpass, creating a wind tunnel effect, a new study found differently.

"In our research, there is no one findin...

Walmart Recalls Room Spray for Rare Bacteria That Sickened 4, Killing 2

Walmart has recalled an aromatic room spray sold nationwide after the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention identified the presence of a "rare and dangerous" bacteria in the spray that's linked to four illnesses, including two deaths.

The retailer sold about 3,900 bottles of Better Homes and Gardens' Essential Oil Infused Aromatherapy Room Spray with Gemstones in six different s...

Legionnaires' Disease Outbreak Hits Long Island, N.Y.

Health officials say they are trying to track down the source of 10 reported cases of Legionnaires' disease within a one-mile radius in a Long Island, N.Y., neighborhood.

The patients range in age from 35 to 96. As of Saturday, one had died, two remained hospitalized and seven had been released from the hospital, CBS News reported.

Legionnaires is a rare form of pneumonia c...

Two-Thirds of Parents of Kids Ages 5-11 Plan to Get Them Vaccinated Against COVID: Poll

In some heartening news on the vaccine front, two-thirds of American parents of children ages 5 to 11 plan to get their youngsters vaccinated when COVID-19 shots are approved for that age group, a new survey shows.

"While we're encouraged to see that a majority of parents intend to vaccinate their children against COVID-19 once they are eligible, there is clearly more work to be done to h...

Pandemic Saw Rise in Kids Swallowing Magnets, Tiny Batteries

More kids swallowed small magnets and batteries in 2020 compared to previous years -- a worrisome surge that dovetailed with pandemic stay-at-home orders.

An analysis of data from more than 100 U.S. hospitals found that the number of kids 17 and younger who were treated for swallowing foreign objects remained about the same from 2017 to 2021, but there was a large jump in incidents involv...

Going Cordless With Window Blinds Could Save Your Child's Life

Blinds and window coverings might seem harmless, but their cords can be deadly for young children and infants.

The best way to keep children from becoming entangled in these cords is to replace your blinds with cordless versions, advises the Consumer Products Safety Commission (CPSC).

"Children have strangled to death on the cords of window blinds, shades, draperies and other window...

Murders Surged in U.S. in 2020

A record increase was seen in the number of murders in the United States in 2020, in the biggest one-year jump reported since federal officials began tracking homicides in 1960.

Figures showed 4,901 more murders committed in 2020 than in 2019. A total of roughly 21,500 people were killed last year, according to data from 16,000 law enforcement agencies across the country. While the number...

Delay in Graphic Warning Labels on Cigarettes Cost Lives: Study

A specimen cup full of bloody urine.

Decaying feet that sport blackened, rotting toes -- some already amputated.

A pale boy with dark circles under his eyes, drawing breath through an oxygen mask.

Around 179,000 deaths in the United States might have been prevented over the past decade if smokers had been forced to confront such images every time they reached for a pack of cig...

DNA Sensor Can Spot When COVID Is Contagious

A new DNA sensor can detect viruses and tell if they are infectious or not in minutes, a new study finds.

The sensor was developed by using DNA technology, and does not require the need to pretreat test samples. Researchers demonstrated this technique with the human adenovirus (which causes colds and flu) and the virus that causes COVID-19.

"The infectivity status is very important...

Booster Dose of J&J COVID Vaccine Increases Immunity

Getting another shot of the Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine substantially increased its protection, the company announced Tuesday.

According to the results of a new clinical trial, two doses of the vaccine boosts immunity to 94% from the 74% offered by a single dose, the company said in a statement.

"Our single-shot vaccine generates strong immune responses and long-lasting immun...

How Effective Is Your Homemade Mask?

If you're making your own face mask to protect against COVID-19, three layers of cotton towel fabric are best, researchers from India report.

That recommendation comes after testing how best to block cough droplets moving at different rates, from mild to severe.

"Our results show cotton, towel-based fabrics were most effective among the considered fabrics and must be stitched toget...

Why Aren't COVID Vaccines Getting to People Globally?

The highly transmissible Delta variant of COVID-19 has highlighted a fear shared by infectious disease experts worldwide: That increasingly dangerous mutations will continue to crop up until most people around the globe are vaccinated.

"There are going to be more variants and they may eventually be variants of concern or variants that pose problems for the vaccine," said Dr. Amesh Adal...

Pet Dogs Can Alert Owners to Epileptic Seizures

Sit. Fetch. Stay.

Detect seizure.

Yes, you read that correctly.

While many dogs are adept at following basic instructions such as "sit" and "roll over" with some practice and the promise of a treat, new research shows dogs can detect seizures by scent up to an hour before they occur, potentially saving their human's life.

An estimated 3.4 million Americans have epilepsy,...

Stop Use of Ivermectin for COVID-19: AMA, Pharmacist Groups

The prescribing, dispensing and use of ivermectin to prevent or treat COVID-19 outside of clinical trials must end immediately, the American Medical Association, American Pharmacists Association and American Society of Health-System Pharmacists say.

The drug has U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval to treat people with infections caused by internal and external parasites, but is not...

Large-Scale Pandemics Aren't as Rare as You Think: Study

Major pandemics aren't all that rare and they're likely to occur more often in the future, a new study claims.

"The most important takeaway is that large pandemics like COVID-19 and the Spanish flu are relatively likely," study co-author William Pan said in a news release from Duke University, where he is an associate professor of global environmental health.

That points to the need...

Salmonella Illness in 17 States Tied to Salami, Prosciutto

Two salmonella outbreaks that appear related to salami and other Italian-style meats have sickened at least 36 people in 17 states, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Twelve people have been hospitalized. No deaths have been reported.

Because some people recover from salmonella without medical care and aren't tested, the CDC suspects the true number of...

Stop Using Ivermectin Veterinary Drug to Treat COVID, FDA Urges

Taking a drug meant for horses and cattle to prevent or treat COVID-19 is dangerous and could be fatal, the U.S Food and Drug Administration warns.

The agency has received multiple reports of people who have been hospitalized after "self-medicating with ivermectin intended for horses," the agency said in a consumer update.

Ivermectin, which is not an anti-viral drug, is generally us...

Common Pesticide to Be Banned Over Links to  Problems in Children

The Biden Administration said Wednesday that a widely used pesticide will be banned because it's been linked to neurological damage in children.

The new rule to block the use of chlorpyrifos on food will take effect in six months, the Environmental Protection Agency said.

"Today [the] EPA is taking an overdue step to protect public health," EPA head Michael Regan said in an agency ...

Gun Sales in Homes With Teens Rose During Pandemic

U.S. gun sales increased early in the COVID-19 pandemic, and many of those firearms ended up in homes with teens, researchers say.

"This finding is concerning because we know that the single biggest risk factor for adolescent firearm injuries is access to an unsecured firearm," said study co-author Dr. Patrick Carter. He is co-director of the Institute for Firearm Injury Prevention at the...

Portable Generators Recalled After Handle Amputates Fingers

Reports of amputated and crushed fingers have prompted the recall of thousands of portable generators made by Generac.

The recall involves more than 321,000 gas-powered Generac and DR 6500 watt and 8000 watt portable generators in the United States, and more than 4,500 of the generators in Canada.

An unlocked handle can trap users' fingers against the generator frame when the genera...

Biden Reverses Trump Policy Limiting U.S. Nursing Home Fines

The Biden administration has reversed a Trump policy that limited the size of fines that U.S. nursing homes could be slapped with for violating safety standards.

The Trump policy was adopted in 2017 and prevented the U.S. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) from hitting a nursing home with a fine for each day it didn't comply with federal standards.

That reduced many pe...

McCormick Recalls Seasonings Over Salmonella Risk

McCormick & Co. on Wednesday announced the recall of several of its popular seasonings because of potential salmonella contamination.

Included in the recall are McCormick Perfect Pinch Italian Seasoning, McCormick Culina...

Worried About Delta-Linked 'Breakthrough' Infections? Experts Explain the Risks

Even if they're fully vaccinated against COVID-19, certain people may need to take extra precautions to prevent "breakthrough" infections with the highly transmissible Delta variant, experts say.

The Delta variant is causing most of the new COVID cases in the United States, and older people and those with immune-compromising conditions may be at greater risk than others, say researchers....

Regulators Pressure AirBnB, Vrbo After Another Child Dies in Elevator Accident

The death of another child between a residential elevator's inner and outer doors had prompted the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) to call on Airbnb and other vacation rental ...

'Superbug' Fungus Spreads Among Vulnerable in Two U.S. Cities

An untreatable "superbug" fungus is spreading in a Washington, D.C., nursing home and two Dallas-area hospitals, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Thursday.

There were 101 candida auris cases at the nursing home and 22 cases at the hospitals from January to April, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, which did not identify the f...

Monkeypox Case Confirmed in U.S. Resident, Threat of Spread Is Low

A case of monkeypox has been confirmed in an American who had recently traveled to Nigeria, U.S. health officials reported. Officials believe the threat of the virus spreading to others is low.

Monkeypox is a rare but potentially serious viral illness that's in the same family of viruses as smallpox, but causes a milder infection, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prev...

It's BBQ Season, Prime Time for Grill Fires

If you're not careful, your grilling season could go up in flames, an expert warns.

Each year, U.S. fire departments respond to about 5,700 residential barbecue fires, according to the Federal Emergency Management Agency's U.S. Fire Administration. Those fires result in thousands of emergency department visits and $37 million in damages a year.

"The best way to prevent damages and i...

Five Neutrogena and Aveeno Spray Sunscreens Recalled Due to Benzene

Five Neutrogena and Aveeno spray sunscreen products have been recalled because they may contain small amounts of benzene, Johnson & Johnson announced Wednesday.

Benzene is a human carcinogen and can get into the body through the skin, through the mouth and by inhalation, the company said in a statement.

"Out of an abundance of caution, we are recalling all lots of these specific aer...

U.S. COVID Vaccine Rollout Saved 279,000 Lives: Study

COVID-19 vaccines have prevented at least 279,000 deaths and 1.25 million hospitalizations in the United States, but the Delta variant poses a significant threat to that progress, researchers say.

"The vaccines have been strikingly successful in reducing the spread of the virus and saving hundreds of thousands of lives in the United States alone," said study author Alison Galvani, directo...

Backyard Fireworks on the 4th?  Rethink It to Keep Your Child Safe

If you're planning on shooting off fireworks on the 4th of July, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) urges you to find other ways to celebrate the holiday.

"We know that sales of fireworks increased in 2020 as did injuries, so parents and caregivers need to be vigilant this 4th of July, and leave any fireworks to the professionals," Dr. James Dodington, a member of the executive comm...

Summer Playgrounds Come With Fun and Hazards

As the pandemic eases and children flock to playgrounds this summer, parents need to make sure their kids are safe, the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) says.

"After a challenging school year and months of being socially distanced and kept apart from their friends, children are eager to get outside and play," said AAOS spokesperson Dr. Rachel Goldstein. She is a pediatric o...

Rideshare Apps Could Be Saving Lives, Study Shows

WEDNESDAY, June 9, 2021 (HealthDay News) - You've heard it often: Don't get behind the wheel of a car after a night of drinking. Now, a new study confirms that rideshare services like Uber and Lyft are making it easier for people to follow that advice and get home unharmed and alive.

Texas researchers saw a marked change in motor vehicle collision traumas from before Uber entered the Hou...

Death Rates Are Rising Across Rural America

In rural America, more people die from chronic health conditions and substance abuse than in suburbs and cities, and the gap is widening.

Researchers report in a new study that the difference in rural and urban death rates tripled over the past 20 years mostly due to deaths among middle-aged white men and women.

"We looked at all-cause death, and found that instead of the difference...

As Teen He Made News Opposing Anti-Vax Mom. Now, He's Urging COVID Shots for Youth

Ethan Lindenberger knows what it's like when you have anti-vaxxer parents: At 18, he gained national notoriety when he sought vaccines in defiance of his mother's fervent wishes.

Now, the 20-year-old has some advice for teens facing a similar dilemma posed by the pandemic -- how to convince their anti-vaxxer parents to let them get the COVID-19 vaccine.

The Pfizer shot is now FDA--a...

Summer Safety Tips for the Great Outdoors

As you head into the great outdoors this summer, keep safety in mind, an expert says.

Drowning is one of summer's risks. It only takes a few seconds and can happen without an obvious struggle, according to Dr. Seth Hawkins, a wilderness medicine expert and assistant professor of emergency medicine at Wake Forest Baptist Health in Winston-Salem, N.C.

Adults must always closely superv...

More Pot-Linked Poisoning Cases as Edibles' Popularity Booms

Newfangled marijuana products -- edibles, concentrates, vapes -- are driving an overall increase in pot-related calls to U.S. poison control centers, a new study shows.

There were more than 11,100 calls related to marijuana use in 2019, up from about 8,200 in 2017, researchers said.

More and more of those calls are related to manufactured products that contain distilled amounts of T...

Poison Centers Warn Against Gas Siphoning

A rash of gasoline-related poisoning calls has led U.S. poison experts to warn against gas siphoning.

Gasoline hoarding and siphoning in some East Coast states has led to a significant increase in gasoline-related emergencies, the Association of Poison Control Centers said.

Recent concerns about limited gasoline supplies due to the shutdown of a major pipeline led some people to try...

Magnets in Cellphones, Smartwatches Might Affect Pacemakers, FDA Warns

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is warning that strong magnets in some cellphones and smartwatches can interfere with pacemakers and other implanted medical devices.

Studies have shown that these high-strength magnets may cause some implants to switch to "magnet mode," stopping normal functioning until the magnet is moved away from the device.

Many implants have a "magnet mode...

Being Bullied Often Leads Teens to Thoughts of Violence

Bullied and mistreated teens are much more likely to fantasize about hurting or killing others, a new study warns.

"One way to think about fantasies is as our brain rehearsing future scenarios," said lead author Manuel Eisner, director of the University of Cambridge Violence Research Center in the U.K.

His research included more than 1,400 young people in Zurich, Switzerland, who we...

CDC Says Vaccinated Can Shed Masks Outside, Except in Crowds

Fully vaccinated Americans can now go without masks when walking, jogging or biking outdoors, or when dining with small groups at outdoor restaurants, U.S. health officials announced Tuesday.

The latest guidance, from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, followed growing calls from infectious disease experts to drop mask mandates outside because breezes rapidly disperse ai...

Nothing to Sniff at: Depression Common for People With COVID-Linked Smell Loss

Loss of the sense of smell and taste is often an early and enduring symptom of COVID-19. Now, research suggests that for many COVID survivors with long-term sensory loss, it's also depressing.

In a web-based survey completed by 322 adults with COVID and a sudden change in smell or taste, 56% reported decreased enjoyment in life and 43% admitted feeling depressed after losing their sense ...

'Breakthrough' COVID Infections After Vaccination Very Rare: Study

COVID-19 "breakthrough" infections, where someone who's been fully vaccinated becomes infected nonetheless, are exceedingly rare, a new study suggests.

Researchers at Rockefeller University in New York City said they uncovered just two breakthrough infections in a group of 417 university employees who were all more than two weeks out from their second dose of either the Pfizer-BioNTech or...

Biden, Fauci Say Pause in J&J COVID Vaccine Is Sign That Safety Comes First

The Biden Administration sought to reassure Americans on Tuesday that the pausing of Johnson & Johnson's coronavirus vaccine is science at work, and not evidence that COVID-19 vaccines are unsafe.

The pause was first issued Tuesday morning following reports that rare but serious blood clots had developed in six women after they took J&J's vaccine. The Advisory Committee on Immunizati...