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04 Nov

HealthDay Now: Patient Violence Pushes One Nurse Away From Her Career

Grace Politis, a former nurse in the emergency department at Lowell General Hospital, shares her experience of being violently attacked by a patient and how the resulting trauma has prevented her from returning to her post in the emergency room.

Health News Results - 60

Bedsores Can Cause Serious Harm — Are U.S. Nursing Homes Hiding Cases?

People might want to think twice before relying on federal quality ratings to help choose a nursing home for an elderly or frail relative, a new study warns.

The U.S. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) established the Nursing Home Compare website in the 1990s to publicly report patient safety indicators for every nursing facility in the nation.

But the site appears to ...

U.S. Nursing Homes Are Understaffed, But Minority Communities Have It Worst

Staffing shortages at nursing homes across the United States are severe in disadvantaged areas where needs may be greatest, researchers say.

The study — recently published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society — looked at staffing before the COVID-19 pandemic. It f...

Nurses Key to Spotting Postpartum Depression in New Moms

Nurses can be trained to detect postpartum depression in new mothers and could be crucial in spotting the condition early, researchers report.

Postpartum depression affects about 15% of new moms and can cause persistent sadness, fatigue, feelings of hopelessness and wort...

Pandemic's Early Days Hit Nurses Hard: Report

Frontline nurses were plagued by "moral distress" in the early days of the pandemic because they lacked the support to provide high-quality care, a new report reveals.

Between May and September 2020, researchers interviewed 100 nurses across the United States who cared for COVID-19 patients.

The nurses reported moral distress caused by knowing how to treat patients and protect thems...

Putting Hospitalized COVID Patients on Their Belly May Not Be a Good Idea After All

Placing hospitalized COVID-19 patients on their stomach is helpful if they're on a mechanical ventilator, but a new study suggests it's not a good idea for patients who are not intubated.

"Awake" COVID patients - as opposed to ventilated patients who are kept sedated - did not benefit from lying ...

Health Care Workers Were At Highest COVID Risk in Workplace

U.S. health care workers were most likely to be infected with COVID-19 at work during the pandemic's first year, according to a new study that challenges previous research suggesting their risk was highest off the job.

Researchers said their findings could help guide efforts to better protect ...

Report Says Nursing Home Industry Needs an Overhaul

THURSDAY, April 7, 2022 (HealthDay News) --The nursing home industry is awash in ineffective care and staffing shortages, claims a new report that calls for sweeping changes in an industry whose failures have only been exacerbated by the pandemic.

Experts from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine minced no words in in their 605-page

  • By Cara Murez and Robin Foster HealthDay Reporters
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  • April 7, 2022
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  • Overworked, Underpaid: Report Finds Wages Lag for U.S. Health Care Workers

    Though they're on the front lines of the COVID-19 pandemic, U.S. health care workers' paychecks don't always adequately reward those efforts.

    Wages for health care workers actually rose less than the average across all U.S. employment sectors during the first and second years of the pandemic, according to a

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  • March 2, 2022
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  • Biden to Propose Overhaul of U.S. Nursing Homes

    Minimum staffing levels will be a main feature of a major overhaul of U.S. nursing homes that President Joe Biden is expected to announce in his State of the Union speech Tuesday night.

    Staffing levels are considered a critical marker for nursing home quality, but the pandemic has left many facilities short of nurses, nursing assistants and other workers who care for patients.

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    Most Vaccine-Hesitant Health Care Workers Change Their Minds, Study Shows

    Most health care workers at a large U.S. hospital who initially refused COVID-19 vaccines eventually went and got their shots, new research reveals.

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  • Robert Preidt
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  • February 4, 2022
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  • Omicron Batters Already Strained U.S. Hospitals

    U.S. hospitals continue to reel from the pressure posed by the ongoing pandemic, facing critical workforce shortages and rising labor costs that amount to a "national emergency," hospital executives say.

    Nearly 1,400 hospitals -- 31% of the nation's total -- are on the verge of critical staffing shortages, according to the American Hospital Association (AHA). In 12 states, 40% or more of ...

    Crowded Emergency Rooms Cost Lives: Study

    A seemingly endless wait in an emergency department can be taxing for many reasons, but new research suggests that long delays in being admitted to the hospital may even raise a patient's risk of death within the following 30 days.

    Why? One possible reason: A crowded ER might mean care happens in suboptimal spaces, said study author Simon Jones, a research professor in the department of p...

    Surge of U.S. Military Medical Personnel to Ease Medical Worker Shortages

    President Joe Biden plans to announce Thursday that a "surge" of U.S. military medical personnel will soon be deployed to hospitals struggling with staff shortages amid soaring COVID-19 cases.

    More than 1,000 will begin arriving at hospitals nationwide starting next week, and that deployment will be in addition to other federal medical personnel who have already been sent to states to off...

    Quality of Home Health Care Varies Between Urban, Rural Areas

    Need in-home health care? Know this: The quality of your care may depend on where you live.

    That's the takeaway from a new study from New York University that gave agencies in urban areas high marks for keeping patients out of the hospital. It found that home health agencies in rural areas, meanwhile, get care started sooner.

    "Our study highlights the persistence of disparities in q...

    Pandemic Stress, Exhaustion Weigh on Health Care Workers

    The pandemic is taking a toll on health care workers' sleep, which can put both their mental health and patient care at risk, researchers warn.

    Their study of more than 800 New York City health care workers found that compared to those with no sleep problems, those with poor sleep were two times more likely to report symptoms of depression, 70% more likely to report anxiety, and 50% more...

    Biden Plan Will Spend $1.5 Billion to Boost Health Worker Supply

    Vice President Kamala Harris announced Monday that the Biden administration will spend $1.5 billion to tackle a health care worker shortage in underserved communities.

    The money from the COVID-19 recovery program, called the American Rescue Plan, and other sources will go to three federal programs that provide scholarships and loan repayments for health care students and workers if they a...

    Guard Dogs, Panic Buttons: Nurses Under Threat From Rising Violence

    Emergency room nurse Grace Politis was catching up on paperwork during her shift when she suddenly realized her head hurt badly. Then she blacked out.

    "Later on, I found out I was hit in the head twice with a fire extinguisher by a patient," said Politis, who works at Lowell General Hospital in Lowell, Mass.

    A disturbed man awaiting psychiatric evaluation had fractured Politis' skul...

    Nurses Have Suicidal Thoughts More Often Than Other Workers: Study

    U.S. nurses think about suicide more often than other workers do, but are less likely to tell anyone about it, new research reveals.

    For the study, the researchers analyzed the responses of more than 7,000 nurses and nearly 5,200 other general workforce members who took part in a national poll on well-being that was conducted in November 2017 and included questions on issues ranging from ...

    Biden Administration to Invest $100 Million to Ease Health Worker Shortage

    The National Health Service Corps will receive $100 million to help tackle the U.S. health care worker shortage, the White House announced Thursday.

    That's a five-fold increase in funding from previous years for a program that helps find primary care doctors for communities that struggle to recruit and keep them, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, NBC News<...

    Despite Pressures of Pandemic, U.S. Nursing School Enrollment Climbs

    Even as large numbers of U.S. nurses leave their jobs due to the stress of the pandemic, there's been a big uptick in applications to nursing schools, the American Association of Colleges of Nursing says.

    Enrollment in bachelor's, master's and doctoral nursing programs increased 5.6% from 2019 to 2020, with just over 250,000 new students, the Associated Press reported.

    Figu...

    Most Older Americans Believe Health Care Workers Should Be Vaccinated: Poll

    Eight in 10 older Americans think health care workers should be vaccinated against COVID-19, according to a new poll.

    Among 50- to 80-year-olds, 61% of respondents said the vaccine should be required for all health care workers. Another 19% said vaccination should probably be required. The remaining 20% oppose mandatory vaccination, the findings showed.

    The results are from a nation...

    Americans Have High Trust in Health Care Providers: Poll

    WEDNESDAY, Aug. 11, 2021 (HealthDay News ) -- Doctors, nurses and pharmacists are highly trusted by most Americans, a new survey shows.

    Those health professionals do what's right either most or all of the time, said at least seven in 10 respondents in the poll from the University of Chicago Harris School of Public Policy and the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Res...

    All Health Care, Long-Term Care Workers in California Must Get COVID Shots

    All 2.2 million health care workers and long-term care workers in California will now have to be fully vaccinated against COVID-19 by Sept. 30, the California Department of Public Health said Thursday.

    Last month, Gov. Gavin Newsom said health care workers would have the choice of either getting vaccinated or undergoing weekly testing, but the state health department's order does not give...

    Nursing Home Staff Closest to Patients Are Least Likely to Get COVID Vaccines

    Aides in long-term care facilities are less likely than other staff to be vaccinated, even though they have the most contact with vulnerable patients and could infect them with COVID-19, a new federal study shows.

    Researchers from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention analyzed data from 300 long-term care facilities nationwide. The research showed that 75% of physicians work...

    Major Medical Groups Call for Mandatory COVID Vaccination for Health Workers

    All health care workers should be required to be vaccinated against COVID-19, dozens of major U.S. medical groups said in a joint statement released Monday.

    "Due to the recent COVID-19 surge and the availability of safe and effective vaccines, our health care organizations and societies advocate that all health care and long-term care employers require their workers to receive the COVID-1...

    Keeping Same Nurse for All Home Health Care May Be Crucial for Dementia Patients

    Dementia patients who have the same nurse for all of their home health care visits are a third less likely to be readmitted to the hospital, a new study finds.

    "While continuity of nursing care may benefit every home health care patient, it may be particularly critical for people with dementia," said study co-author Chenjuan Ma. "Having the same person delivering care can increase familia...

    Prior COVID Infection May Shield You From Another for at Least 10 Months

    In some good news for those who have already suffered through a bout of COVID-19, a new study finds they may have a much lower risk of reinfection for at least 10 months.

    For the study, the researchers analyzed rates of SARS-CoV-2 infections between October 2020 and February 2021 among more than 2,000 nursing home residents (median age 86) and staff. Antibody testing was used to determine...

    Stressed, Burned-Out Nurses Make More Medical Errors: Study

    Critical care nurses with poor mental and physical health are more likely to make mistakes, but a more supportive work environment could improve the situation, a new study suggests.

    "It's critically important that we understand some of the root causes that lead to those errors and do everything we can to prevent them," said lead author Bernadette Melnyk, dean of the College of Nursing at ...

    Nurses Are Dying From Suicide at Higher Rates

    Before the pandemic began, suicide risk was twice as high among female nurses compared with American women as a whole, a new study warns.

    Even within the health care community itself, female nurses were found to be roughly 70% more likely to die by suicide than female doctors.

    Why? Study author Matthew Davis said that for now, "We don't know for certain what forces are directly resp...

    Stressed, Exhausted: Frontline Workers Faced Big Mental Strain in Pandemic

    Doctors, nurses and other frontline health workers in U.S. emergency departments have struggled with significant mental health challenges during the COVID-19 pandemic, a new poll reveals.

    "As the nation moves into what many believe is a fourth wave of COVID, this study is important to our understanding of the impact of the pandemic on the mental well-being of frontline medical personnel,"...

    Strain of COVID Care Has Many Health Professionals Looking for an Exit

    After the pandemic, the next great health care challenge in the United States could be retaining highly trained doctors, nurses and scientists, a new study warns.

    Up to one in five employees at an academic medical institution are considering leaving their professions because of the strains of coping with the pandemic, according to the researchers.

    "It's sobering to learn that, d...

    Too Few Minorities in U.S. Health Care Workforce: Report

    Blacks, Hispanics and Native Americans are significantly underrepresented in U.S. health professions, with little indication that diversity will improve, a new study says.

    In 2019, Black people made up about 12.1% of the U.S. workforce, but their representation in 10 health professions studied ranged from 3.3% for physical therapists to 11.4% for respiratory therapists.

    "Our finding...

    In Rare Cases, People Can Get COVID After Vaccination

    It's very rare, but it is possible to catch COVID-19 even if you've been vaccinated, a new study finds.

    Looking at vaccinated health care workers at two University of California campuses, researchers found a tiny number tested positive for the virus. This finding highlights the need to keep wearing a mask and to keep social distancing, the researchers said.

    "Because of the compulso...

    Study Finds Growing Acceptance of COVID Vaccine by U.S. Health Care Workers

    Health care workers were just as uneasy as everyone else when COVID-19 vaccines were about to be approved in the United States, with large numbers hesitant to take the shot in early December, a new study reveals.

    But that hesitancy dwindled over the next few weeks, as health system employees learned more about the safety and efficacy data gathered during clinical trials of the vaccines, r...

    Health Care Workers More Likely to Catch COVID at Home, Not Workplace

    Health care workers are more likely to catch COVID-19 at home or in their community than on the job, a new study finds.

    "The news is reassuring in that it shows the measures taken are working to prevent infections from spreading in health care facilities," said study co-author Dr. Anthony Harris. He's professor of epidemiology and public health at the University of Maryland School of Medi...

    Pandemic Is Hitting Hospitals Hard, Including Their Bottom Line

    U.S. hospitals are expected to lose billions again in 2021, leaving them in dire financial shape as the COVID-19 pandemic guts the industry for a second year.

    Hospitals could lose $53 billion to $122 billion in revenue in 2021, between 4% and 10% of their total revenue, according to an analysis prepared by consulting firm Kaufman Hall & Associates for the American Hospital Association.

    Bedside Manner Even More Important for Hospital Patients Admitted Via the ER

    Being rushed into hospital care can be an emotional experience. So, what a surgeon says to trauma or emergency surgery patients plays a role in how satisfied they are after their operations, a new study finds.

    Researchers analyzed data from nearly 187,000 patients discharged from 168 HCA Healthcare hospitals in the United States in 2018 and 2019. HCA Healthcare is a publicly traded compan...

    Giving Back: Once a Lung Transplant Recipient, Now a Surgical Nurse

    Nurses are known for being kind, caring and sympathetic, but Brianna Fogelman brings an uncommon empathy to her nursing job at Johns Hopkins Medicine in Baltimore.

    Fogelman, 27, underwent a double lung transplant last year to treat a rare lung disease and returned this fall to work in the same hospital where she received her life-changing surgery.

    "I understand how it feels to have ...

    Blood Pressure Often Differs Widely Between Two Arms: Study

    Blood pressure readings between the two arms can be different, and that disparity can sometimes be a warning sign of heart trouble down the road.

    That's the finding of an analysis of 24 past studies: When people have at least a 5-point difference in blood pressure between the two arms, their risk of heart attack, stroke or premature death inches up. And the greater the difference, the mor...

    Pandemic Taking Big Mental Health Toll on Health Care Workers

    Frontline health care workers have been through tremendous challenges this past year while treating COVID-19 patients throughout the world.

    It should come as no surprise that many are having trouble emotionally.

    A new study looked at the impact of the pandemic on sleep and mental health among the general population and health care workers by analyzing 55 studies involving nearly 190...

    Nurse Practitioners Key to Opioid Treatment in Rural U.S.: Study

    In isolated areas of the United States, nurse practitioners are filling an important role in helping people access treatment for opioid addiction, according to a Washington State University (WSU) study.

    Nurse practitioners and physician assistants have only been authorized to prescribe buprenorphine (a drug that can treat opioid addiction) for the past few years with the implementation of...

    COVID CPR Safety Measures Don't Lessen Survival: Study

    The effectiveness of CPR isn't compromised when EMS crews and others take recommended safety precautions against the new coronavirus, researchers say.

    Interim guidance issued by the American Heart Association and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says health care providers should take extra precautions during the pandemic. That includes using personal protective equipmen...

    Nurses Can Make the Difference for New Moms' Breastfeeding

    One key to breastfeeding success? Having enough hospital nurses to ensure that new moms get top-notch care.

    Hospitals with higher rates of exclusive breastfeeding had nurses who provided more consistent care, according to a new report.

    That care included helping moms have skin-to-skin contact with their babies and breastfeed within an hour of giving birth. Nurses also provi...

    Many Health Care Workers Who Have Coronavirus Don't Have Symptoms: Study

    Four in 10 health care workers who test positive for COVID-19 don't have symptoms, which means they could unknowingly spread the disease to co-workers and patients, researchers say.

    For the new study, the research team reviewed 97 studies that included more than 230,000 health care workers in 24 countries. Rates of SARS-CoV-2 infection among the health care workers ranged from 7% ...

    Even With PPE, Risk of COVID-19 Still High for Frontline Workers

    At the peak of the pandemic in the United States and United Kingdom, frontline health care workers, especially minorities, had much higher risks for COVID-19 than other individuals, a new study finds.

    Paramedics, who are often the first to see sick patients, are at far greater risk of testing positive for COVID-19 than others, the researchers said. That's especially true for frontlin...

    'Aerosol Boxes' Meant to Protect COVID Health Teams Might Harm Them: Study

    Aerosol boxes meant to protect health care workers when they intubate COVID-19 patients may actually increase their exposure to airborne virus particles, an Australian study warns.

    Intubation is done when patients are placed on a ventilator.

    Aerosol boxes have been touted as a quick, simple way to protect workers, but their effectiveness and safety were never clinically test...

    Major Medical Groups Urge Americans to Wear Face Masks

    Three major medical groups are urging Americans to wear face masks, wash their hands and practice social distancing as coronavirus cases continue to surge in the United States.

    In an open letter to the public released Monday, the groups noted that stay-at-home orders and other social distancing policies curbed the spread of COVID-19 in the spring.

    "But in the weeks since st...

    After Heart Attack, Home Care Can Prevent a Return to Hospital

    Receiving home health care reduces heart attack survivors' risk of hospital readmission after discharge, a new study finds.

    In the United States, only a small percentage of heart attack survivors receive home care such as nursing and physical therapy, according to study authors.

    The findings were presented recently at a virtual American Heart Association meeting. Research p...

    Most Workers Report for Duty With Flu-Like Symptoms, Global Survey Shows

    Most people around the world say they would continue to work if they had flu-like symptoms, an online survey finds.

    In the face of the coronavirus pandemic, researchers called the findings disturbing.

    The survey -- conducted online between October 2018 and January 2019, before the emergence of COVID-19 -- included responses from 533 workers in 49 countries. Respondents inclu...

    PTSD May Plague Nurses, Especially in COVID-19 Era

    Nursing is not a profession for the fainthearted, but new research shows that post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) can strike nurses, and suggests the new coronavirus may make things even worse for those on the front lines of the pandemic.

    Though the study was conducted a year ago, the results are particularly timely as nurses around the world are treating millions of COVID-19 cases ...

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