Get Healthy!

Results for search "Hearing Disorders: Misc.".

Health News Results - 35

Could Cheaper, Over-the-Counter Hearing Aids Finally Be Here?

Until now, folks suffering from hearing loss typically have had to fork out thousands of dollars for a device that could be adjusted only by a professional audiologist.

No wonder that only one-quarter of the nearly 29 million U.S. adults who could benefit from a hearing aid have actually tried one, according to the U.S.

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
  • |
  • September 9, 2021
  • |
  • Full Page
  • Another Fireworks Hazard: Loss of Hearing

    Add hearing loss to the many dangers posed by fireworks.

    More than 40 million Americans have some type of hearing loss, and about 10 million of those cases can be attributed to noise, according to the American Academy of Audiology.

    Noise from fireworks can reach 155 decibels -- louder than a jet plane taking off (150 decibels from 82 feet away) or a jackhammer (about 100 decibels),...

    Osteoporosis Might Also Raise a Woman's Odds for Hearing Loss

    It's a connection most women may not be aware of, but a new study suggests osteoporosis may raise your risk of hearing loss, and the drugs often used to treat thinning bones won't lower that risk.

    According to researcher Dr. Sharon Curhan, data from her team's new study suggests that "osteoporosis and low bone density may be important contributors to aging-related hearing loss."

    Tha...

    What Works Best to Ease Recurrent Ear Infections in Kids?

    Frequent middle-ear infections are the nemesis of many parents and young children. Now a new study suggests that a common treatment -- "ear tubes" -- may not prevent future bouts.

    Middle-ear infections (or acute otitis media) are second only to the common cold in creating childhood misery. They occur when the air-filled space behind the eardrum becomes infected and fills with fluid -- whi...

    Is Your Spin Class Music Way Too Loud?

    Turning down the music at your fitness classes won't affect the intensity of your workout, researchers say.

    It's common for fitness instructors to crank up the volume -- sometimes to levels loud enough to damage hearing -- because they think it will help students work harder.

    But researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine found there's no link between music volume ...

    Diminished Hearing, Vision Together Could Be Risk Factor for Dementia

    A combination of hearing and vision loss is tied to an increased risk of mental decline and dementia, but having just one of those impairments isn't connected with a higher risk, a new South Korean study finds.

    It's not clear why a diminishing of both senses, but not just one, would raise dementia risks, but the study's leader had a theory that's tied to the importance of socializing in ...

    Most Older Americans Need Hearing Checks, But Many Aren't Getting Them

    Even though research has shown that at least 50% of older adults suffer some degree of hearing loss, a new study finds that most aren't getting their hearing checked.

    A national survey of more than 2,000 adults, aged 50 to 80, found that 80% said their primary care doctor hadn't asked about their hearing in the past two years. Nearly as many said they haven't had their hearing checked by ...

    As Mask-Wearing Prevails, People Are Adapting to Understanding Speech

    As face masks have become the norm during the coronavirus pandemic, people have learned to communicate more clearly with their mouth covered, new research finds.

    For the study, researchers asked participants to record sentences in three speech styles -- casual, clear and positive-emotional -- while they were masked and unmasked.

    Background noise was added to a variety of the sentenc...

    Targeted Microwaves Probably Caused U.S. Embassy Illnesses: Scientists

    Targeted microwaves were the likely cause of mysterious illnesses that afflicted staff and their families at U.S. embassies in Cuba and China, according to a U.S. National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine report.

    Symptoms included ear pain, intense head pressure or vibration, dizziness, visual problems, thinking difficulties and the perception of loud noise.

    The phy...

    COVID Can Make Your Ears Ring

    Tinnitus, a common hearing problem, may be worsened by COVID-19 or possibly even triggered by the new coronavirus, new research indicates.

    Moreover, people with tinnitus are further struggling because of lifestyle changes forced by the pandemic, the study found.

    Tinnitus includes the perception of noise, like ringing, in the ears and head. It's associated with reduced emotional well...

    For Kids With Hearing Issues, Early Intervention Crucial to School Readiness

    When babies with hearing impairments get help very early in life, they are more likely to be "kindergarten-ready" when the time comes, a new study finds.

    In the United States, all states have government-funded "early intervention" programs designed to assist parents whose babies are deaf or hard of hearing. Ideally, that intervention starts soon after hearing issues are diagnosed, as ...

    Hearing Persists at End of Life, Brain Waves of Hospice Patients Show

    Even if they appear unresponsive, dying people may still be able to hear.

    That's the takeaway from a Canadian analysis of hospice patients in Vancouver.

    Researchers compared electroencephalography (EEG) data -- a measure of electrical activity in the brain -- collected when patients were conscious and when they became unresponsive at the end of life. Those patients were comp...

    Say What? Like Animals, People Perk Up Their Ears to Hear

    Like many other animals, people can move their ears to focus on a specific sound, researchers say.

    However, this movement of ears is subtle and the ability to do it hasn't been known until now.

    By measuring electrical signals in ear muscles as volunteers tried to detect sounds, researchers found that people make tiny, unconscious movements to aim their ears at a particular s...

    Another Side Effect of COVID-19 -- Lasting Hearing Problems?

    The aftereffects of COVID-19 are numerous, and now British researchers report that many patients recovering from infection with the new coronavirus have lingering hearing problems.

    For the study, 120 U.K. patients who had been hospitalized for COVID-19 took part in a phone survey.

    When the patients were asked if they had any changes in their hearing, 13% said it was wor...

    Face Masks Making Things Tough for the Deaf

    As the debate over face masks continues, few may realize how the coverings make it hard for the 48 million Americans with hearing loss to communicate with others.

    Masks can muffle sound, making it more difficult to understand speech and higher-pitched voices; prevent the ability to read lips and see facial expressions, which help people with hearing loss better understand what they're...

    Masks, Video Calls: Pandemic Is Hampering Communication for Those With Hearing Problems

    Face masks help prevent the spread of COVID-19, but they have a huge downside for people with hearing problems: They muffle sound and prevent lip-reading.

    But that's only one of several ways that pandemic-related safety precautions are making communication more challenging for those who are deaf or have hearing problems, researchers say.

    Limits on visitors in medical set...

    More Clues to the Genes Behind Hearing Loss

    Dutch researchers have identified a common genetic variant as a cause of deafness, and say it could be a good target for gene therapy.

    Deafness in adults is known to be inherited but, unlike childhood deafness, the genetic causes aren't clear.

    To date, 118 genes have been linked to deafness. Variants in these genes explain much of the deafness present at birth and in childho...

    Experts Warn of 'Sound Cannon' Hearing Loss at Protest Marches

    As Americans take to the streets to protest police brutality, they may face ear-blasting "sound cannons" that can harm their hearing.

    Sound cannons, or long-range acoustic devices (LRADs), were developed for the military, and now some police departments use them as weapons in crowd control. The sound they emit is greater than that of a jet engine and surpasses the average threshold fo...

    AHA News: Traffic Noise Might Increase Diabetes, Blood Pressure Risks

    Navigating through congested road traffic is enough to make even the most laid-back people lose their cool. As it turns out, just the sound of road noise may increase the risk of developing high blood pressure and diabetes.

    That was the finding of researchers who conducted a study of more than 1 million long-term Toronto residents between ages 35 and 100 over a 15-year period.

    ...

    A Stroke at 30,000 Feet? For One Lucky Passenger, It Wasn't

    A flight attendant on a recent commercial flight sent out the message: "Is there a doctor on board?"

    An otherwise young, fit male passenger had suddenly lost the ability to move the muscles on the right side of his face, including the ability to close his right eye. He was drooling and had slurred speech.

    Dr. Alan Hunter, who happened to be on the flight, answered the flight...

    How Are Your Newborn's Ears Working? Early Hearing Test Is a Must

    When you have a baby, it seems like you visit the doctor all the time for checks on weight and length and to get needed vaccinations. But are you as aware of the guidelines regarding hearing checks for your little one?

    Following them is extremely important to his or her development, especially if a problem is found. Hearing loss is the most common congenital condition in the United S...

    Ring in the New Year Without Ringing in Your Ears

    Ringing in the new year shouldn't be a deafening experience, so protect your hearing, experts advise.

    Loud music, fireworks, party horns, kazoos and other noisemakers can all help usher in 2020 with a blast, but can also cause ringing in your ears or even permanent hearing damage, according to the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association.

    Here are five tips from the as...

    Routine Ear Wax 'Flush' Leaves Woman's Face Paralyzed

    In what doctors say is an extremely rare occurrence, a woman in her 70s went to her doctor to have impacted ear wax removed and wound up with permanent paralysis in her face.

    The case report was described by British physicians in the Dec. 19 online edition of JAMA Otolaryngology--Head & Neck Surgery.

    "A woman in her 70s presented to her general physician with imp...

    Playing Sports Might Sharpen Your Hearing

    Playing sports may improve the brain's ability to process sounds, a finding that could lead to new therapies for people who struggle with hearing, researchers report.

    "No one would argue against the fact that sports lead to better physical fitness, but we don't always think of brain fitness and sports," said study senior author Nina Kraus. She's a professor of communication sciences a...

    Music Career Might Bring Ringing in the Ears

    Being a musician might be hard on your hearing, new British research suggests.

    Those in the music industry have a much higher risk of tinnitus than people who work in quieter settings, a new study finds.

    People with tinnitus hear ringing, buzzing or whistling noises when there are no external sounds.

    "Our research shows that people working in the music industry are...

    Deep Brain Stimulation May Relieve Ringing in the Ears: Study

    Ringing in the ears (tinnitus) can make life miserable, but a brain implant may help, preliminary research suggests.

    In a phase 1 trial of five patients whose severe tinnitus did not respond to other treatments, deep brain stimulation (DBS) diminished the ringing in four. The fifth patient received no relief, the researchers reported.

    In DBS, electrodes are implanted in th...

    If a Child's Schoolwork Slips, Don't Rule Out Hearing Loss

    Falling school grades could be a sign of hearing loss in children, according to the American Academy of Audiology.

    "A child with just minor hearing loss can be missing a significant amount of the classroom discussion," said academy president Lisa Christensen.

    "There are children who have been diagnosed with a learning disability when really what they need are hearing aids,"...

    More Clues to Mysterious Illness Among Staff at U.S. Embassy in Cuba

    Nearly three years ago, U.S. diplomats in Cuba began experiencing hearing loss, dizziness and memory problems -- in what the Trump administration attributed to an attack of unknown origin.

    Now researchers say they have detected some "alterations" in the patients' brain structure and function -- though the significance, if any, is disputed.

    The findings come from 40 U.S. emba...

    Zika's Damage Continues in Children Infected Before Birth

    New research shows that neurological damage for babies who were exposed to the Zika virus while in the womb continues to unfold years after birth.

    Developmental problems were found in one-third of the 216 children studied, some of whom were 3 years old. The problems affected language, thinking and motor skills development. Some also had eye and hearing issues.

    Surprisingly,...

    Huhn? Scientists Working on Hearing Aid That Solves the 'Cocktail Party' Problem

    WEDNESDAY, May 15, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Chances are if you're over 60 it's already happened to you: You're in a crowded room and finding it tough to understand what your partner is saying a couple of feet away.

    It's a longstanding hearing-loss issue known as the "cocktail party" problem. Conventional hearing aids still aren't able to fix it -- to separate out the talk you do

    Quieter NICUs a Good Rx for Premature Babies

    Shhhhh. Preterm infants can benefit from quiet times in hospital neonatal intensive care units (NICUs), a new study says.

    High noise levels are known to harm health, and infants in NICUs are especially vulnerable, so some NICUs have created quiet times to limit potentially dangerous noise levels, according to the Acoustical Society of America.

    "Although the NICU noise...

    'Buzzing' in Ear Alerted Boy to Very Unwelcome Visitor

    The Connecticut 9-year-old knew something was wrong. Three days after a routine day in the school playground, he felt something "foreign" in his right ear and persistent buzzing noises.

    Doctors who examined the boy's ear at Yale-New Haven Hospital quickly ascertained the cause: An eight-legged visitor, a tick, had taken up residence on his eardrum, which was clearly inflamed.

    <...

    Brain Sharpens the Hearing of the Blind, Study Finds

    Researchers have long wondered why blind people seem to have a sharpened sense of hearing. Now a Seattle team has pinpointed specific brain adaptations that occur in folks without sight.

    "There's this idea that blind people are good at auditory tasks, because they have to make their way in the world without visual information. We wanted to explore how this happens in the brain," said ...

    Poor Health Compounds Loneliness in Seniors

    Getting older can be a lonely business, and a new survey shows that health problems only make matters worse.

    The online poll of more than 2,000 adults, aged 50 to 80, revealed that one in four said they feel isolated from other people at least some of the time, and one in three say they don't have regular companionship.

    Health played a role in just how lonely someone was. Th...

    Hearing Aid Upkeep Often Out of Reach for the Poor

    If you're poor, you'll likely have less success with your hearing aid, a new study finds.

    A survey of more than 1,100 Medicare recipients with hearing aids found that 27 percent of low-income users still had a lot of trouble hearing. That compared with just 11 percent of the wealthiest users.

    The reason, the study authors suggested, is that poorer seniors have insufficient a...