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Health News Results - 25

Blood Pressure During Surgery May Be Crucial After Spinal Cord Injury

Tight blood pressure control -- not too high and not too low -- during surgery for spinal cord injuries may improve patients' outcomes, a new study suggests.

"Damage to neurons in spinal cord injuries leads to dysregulation of blood pressure, which in turn limits the supply of blood and oxygen to stressed spinal cord tissue, exacerbating spinal neuron death," said co-lead author Abel Torr...

Mouse Study Points to Possible Breakthrough Against Spinal Cord Injury

Severe spinal cord injuries are incurable today in humans, but a new injectable therapy that restored motion in laboratory mice could pave the way for healing paralyzed people.

The therapy — liquid nanofibers that gel around the damaged spinal cord like a soothing blanket — produces chemical signals that promote healing and reduce scarring, researchers report.

The treatment...

One Big Factor for Survival After Spinal Cord Injury: Resilience

Survivors of spinal cord injuries who develop resilience are able to adapt and thrive despite the challenges, according to a researcher who himself is a resilient survivor.

"For someone with a cord injury, your margin for surviving even small mistakes when it comes to your health is really thin," said James Krause, professor and associate dean for research in the Medical University of Sou...

Post-Stroke Rehab: There's a Sweet Spot in the Timing

After a stroke, the best time to work on regaining hand and arm use is 60 to 90 days later, according to a new clinical trial.

Starting intensive rehab at less than 30 days can be helpful, too, but waiting until six months can be too late for maximum benefit, said researchers from Georgetown University and MedStar National Rehabilitation Network.

Nearly two-thirds of the 750,000 ind...

Stroke Prevented His Speech, But Brain Implant Brought It Back

Researchers have developed an implant that allowed a man with severe paralysis to "speak" again by translating his brain signals into text.

The achievement is the latest step in "brain-computer interface" (BCI) research.

Scientists have been studying BCI technology for years, with the aim of one day giving people with paralysis or limb amputations greater independence in their daily...

Man's Robotic Arm Works Faster With High-Tech Sense of Touch

The robot hand extends toward a small cube, guided by signals from electrodes implanted in the brain of partially paralyzed patient Nathan Copeland.

In surprisingly smooth fashion, Copeland's mind directs the robot hand to pick up the cube and move it to another part of the table.

The process works so well -- at speeds approaching those of average folks -- because for the first time...

'Mind-Reading' Technology Allows Paralyzed Man to Rapidly Text

A microchip implanted in the brain has allowed a paralyzed man to communicate by text -- at speeds that approach the typical smartphone user.

The achievement is the latest advance in "brain-computer interface" (BCI) systems.

Scientists have been studying BCI technology for years, with the aim of one day giving people with paralysis or limb amputations greater independence in their ...

Researchers Use Computers and 'Exoskeletons' to Help Stroke Survivors

Stroke survivor Ken Allsford focused intensely on how he wanted to bend his elbow.

And then the robot exoskeleton attached to his left arm obeyed his unspoken command, moving his crippled limb.

"It was a combination of exciting and trepidation, because sometimes nothing would happen," Allsford, 61, of Katy, Texas, recalled. "But when you actually see it move without actually making ...

B 11/18 Exoskeleton Helps Paralyzed People Walk Again

People paralyzed with spinal cord injuries can safely and effectively use an exoskeleton to assist them in walking, a new study finds.

"Participants showed improvement regardless of level of injury, completeness or duration of injury," said Gail Forrest, director of the Tim and Caroline Reynolds Center for Spinal Stimulation at Kessler Foundation in East Hanover, N.J.

The findings ...

Post-Stroke Rehab at Home May Work Best

Could telehealth help paralyzed stroke victims recover their motor skills faster than they would working directly with a physical therapist?

Yes, claims a new study that found patients who had participated in at least 12 weeks of at-home rehabilitation with live video consultations ("telerehabilitation") scored higher in testing of the recovery of their motor skills than those who had...

Elevated Blood Clotting Factor Linked to Worse COVID-19 Outcomes

Most people now know that COVID-19 can cause blood clots, potentially leading to paralysis, stroke, heart attack and death.

While it's not clear precisely how SARS-CoV-2 causes clots, a new study suggests that the amount of a particular protein -- called factor V -- in a patient's blood may have something to do with it.

In March, researchers at Massachusetts General Hospit...

Mysterious Paralyzing Illness in Kids Is Set to Return, CDC Warns

A new outbreak of a mysterious, potentially fatal polio-like illness could strike hundreds of American children within the next few months, U.S. health officials warned Tuesday.

Acute flaccid myelitis (AFM) outbreaks have occurred every two years in the United States since 2014, peaking between August and November, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said. More than 9 ...

Coma, Paralysis and Rehab: A Long Road to Recovery for Some COVID Survivors

For Ron Panzok and many patients like him, the battle with COVID-19 didn't end when he left the hospital.

From the ambulance ride to North Shore University Hospital on New York's Long Island to the day he finally woke from a medically induced coma five weeks later, Panzok doesn't remember a thing. He missed more than a month of his life.

But emerging from the coma was only t...

First Good Evidence That Brain Hits 'Replay' While You Sleep

If you've ever wondered what your brain is doing while you sleep, a new study gives the first direct evidence that it's busy "replaying" our waking experiences.

The finding comes from a research project called BrainGate, which is testing new technology for people who are paralyzed or have lost a limb. Participants have "micro-electrodes" implanted in their brains, to allow them to exe...

Back in Touch: Technology Restores Hand Sensitivity to Young Quadraplegic

A sense of touch has been restored to a young man who lost it after being left paralyzed from the elbows down following a swimming accident nearly a decade ago.

How? By tapping into almost imperceptible neural signals that can remain even after spinal cord injury, and amplifying those signals to the point where a lost sense of touch can be regained.

The process was achieved ...

Many Can Suffer Facial Paralysis -- and Its Emotional Toll

Each year, hundreds of thousands of Americans develop some form of facial paralysis from a variety of causes.

The loss of facial control and expression that follows can bring sometimes devastating stigma, depression and anxiety, a new study shows.

This seems especially true for people whose facial paralysis came later in life instead of from birth, researchers noted.

...

Routine Ear Wax 'Flush' Leaves Woman's Face Paralyzed

In what doctors say is an extremely rare occurrence, a woman in her 70s went to her doctor to have impacted ear wax removed and wound up with permanent paralysis in her face.

The case report was described by British physicians in the Dec. 19 online edition of JAMA Otolaryngology--Head & Neck Surgery.

"A woman in her 70s presented to her general physician with imp...

One Boy's Battle Back From Mysterious Polio-Like Illness

Last October, 15-year-old Alec Woodruff developed a strange-sounding cough. Less than a week later, he was fighting for his life in the hospital, partially paralyzed and with a tube in his throat attached to a ventilator because just breathing was a task he could no longer do on his own.

Alec's mom, Terri Woodruff, described the first signs of trouble: "I knew something was wrong. Ale...

'Mobile Stroke Units' Help Rush Treatment to Patients

If you're in the throes of a stroke, being stuck in an ambulance in big-city traffic is the last place you want to be -- unless you're riding in a specially equipped ambulance called a mobile stroke unit (MSU).

A new study reports that suspected stroke patients in New York City who were taken to a nearby hospital via MSU began receiving critical, lifesaving treatment about 30 minutes ...

Scientists Spot Signs of Virus Behind Disease Paralyzing Kids

A new antibody test appears to have honed in on the most likely cause of a mysterious polio-like disease that regularly sweeps through the United States.

The new test detected antibodies for two types of enteroviruses in the spinal fluid of dozens of patients diagnosed with acute flaccid myelitis (AFM), a disease that causes potentially permanent and sometimes life-threatening paralys...

Cause of Paralyzing Illness in Kids Remains Elusive

There is still no clear cause for a mysterious paralytic condition that has been striking U.S. children over the past five years, government health officials report.

Researchers at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention suspect that a virus of some kind is the culprit. But the specific germ causing the outbreaks remains unknown, according to the report published online Oc...

Mind-Controlled 'Exoskeleton' Restores Movement to Totally Paralyzed Man

Unable to move either their arms or their legs, quadriplegics are almost completely paralyzed. But in a major breakthrough, a team of French researchers has given one patient the ability to move all four limbs.

How? With the assistance of a whole-body exoskeleton controlled by a patient's brain waves.

"For the first time, a quadriplegic patient was able to walk and control b...

CDC Warns of Start to 'Season' for Mysterious Paralyzing Illness in Kids

The "season" for a polio-like illness that mainly strikes children is about to begin, so public health officials sent out an early warning to doctors on Tuesday.

The largest recorded outbreak of acute flaccid myelitis (AFM) occurred last year, with the illness debilitating 233 people in 41 states across the nation, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

...

Surgeons Give 13 Paralyzed Adults Hand, Arm Movement

Thirteen paralyzed young adults have regained elbow and hand movement after undergoing complex surgery in Australia, surgeons report.

The patients now brush their hair and teeth, feed themselves and put on makeup -- tasks that were impossible before the "nerve transfer" surgery, the doctors report in the July 4 issue of The Lancet medical journal.

"For people with tet...

Surgery Restores Movement to Kids With Polio-Like Illness

Kale Hyder was an active teenager and basketball player when a mysterious polio-like illness struck.

The 6-foot-2 youth from Davenport, Iowa, woke up with a stiff neck in June 2015 at age 15. Within weeks he was paralyzed from the chest down. He was diagnosed with transverse myelitis, and was told he would never regain function of his hands.

But a nerve specialist in New Yo...