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Health News Results - 142

Wearable Vibration Device May Ease Parkinson's Tremor

MONDAY, Nov. 22, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Physiotherapist David Putrino was working on a vibrating glove to help deaf people experience live music when a friend mentioned that the same technology might stop tremors in people with Parkinson's disease.

Putrino, director of rehabilitation innovation for Mount Sinai Health System in New York City, was intrigued. The friend'...

Reminder Apps on Smartphones May Help in Early Dementia

THURSDAY, Nov. 18, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Despite stereotypes about seniors and technology, a small study suggests that older adults in the early stages of dementia can use smartphone apps as memory aids.

The researchers found that older people with mild impairments in memory and thinking were not only able to learn how to use the apps, they said the digital aids made...

Coming Soon: A Wearable Device to Predict Epileptic Seizures

Claire Wiedmaier experiences epileptic seizures so bad that she's broken teeth while in their grip.

"I have some fake teeth. I broke my two bottom front teeth," said Wiedmaier, 23, of Ankeny, Iowa, who these days can expect to have at least four seizures a month.

Knowing when to expect a seizure would be a big help to her.

"It would be nice to know, because then I could get so...

Mouse Study Points to Possible Breakthrough Against Spinal Cord Injury

Severe spinal cord injuries are incurable today in humans, but a new injectable therapy that restored motion in laboratory mice could pave the way for healing paralyzed people.

The therapy — liquid nanofibers that gel around the damaged spinal cord like a soothing blanket — produces chemical signals that promote healing and reduce scarring, researchers report.

The treatment...

Supply Chain Issues Bring Shortages of Drugs, Devices to U.S. Hospitals

The word went out late last month throughout Utah -- if you've got a spare set of aluminum crutches lying around, you should donate them to your local hospital.

An international shortage of aluminum has caused delays in shipments of crutches and walkers, so Utah hospitals banded together for #LeanOnUtah -- a community drive to collect gently used durable medical supplies.

No patient...

FDA Eases Access to Cheaper Over-the-Counter Hearing Aids

Affordable over-the-counter hearing aids could soon bring relief to millions of Americans suffering from hearing loss, under a landmark proposal announced Tuesday by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

The proposal would create a category of hearing aids that could be sold directly to consumers, without either a medical exam or a fitting by an audiologist.

Until now, folks suffer...

'Personalized' Brain Zaps May Ease Tough-to-Treat Depression

Imagine battling debilitating depression for years, trying everything but finding little or no relief.

That's what Sarah, 36, lived with most of her adult life.

"I had exhausted all possible treatment options," recalled Sarah, who did not want her last name used. "It [depression] had controlled my entire life. I barely moved. I barely did anything. I felt tortured every day."

...

SmartWatches Detect Viral Infection Before Symptoms Surface in Study

Someday, your smartwatch might be able to tell you if you're coming down with a virus and how sick you'll be — even before symptoms start.

In a small study, researchers showed that a wearable device, like a Fitbit or Apple Watch, could detect which patients had the H1N1 flu and which had a common cold.

"One of our goals was to be able to detect that infection before a person feel...

Smartphone Apps May Aid in Heart Attack Recovery

After a heart attack, a smartwatch app may help keep patients from being hospitalized again, researchers say.

The app helps patients keep track of medications and make lifestyle changes. It may also reduce rehospitalization in the month after discharge by half, according to a new report.

The American Heart Association says one in six heart attack patients returns to the hospital w...

Can a Computer Program Help Docs Spot Breast Cancer?

An artificial intelligence tool could help radiologists spot breast cancer on ultrasound images and reduce the need for extra testing, new research suggests.

"Our study demonstrates how artificial intelligence can help radiologists reading breast ultrasound exams to reveal only those that show real signs of breast cancer, and to avoid verification by biopsy in cases that turn out to be be...

Robotics Bring the White Cane Into the 21st Century

The "white cane" that many blind people rely on for navigating the world hasn't been upgraded in a century, but researchers are reporting progress on a "robo-cane" they hope will modernize the assistive device.

The prototype cane is equipped with a color 3D camera, sensors and an "on-board" computer designed to guide the user to a desired location and avoid any obstacles alon...

Could Cheaper, Over-the-Counter Hearing Aids Finally Be Here?

Until now, folks suffering from hearing loss typically have had to fork out thousands of dollars for a device that could be adjusted only by a professional audiologist.

No wonder that only one-quarter of the nearly 29 million U.S. adults who could benefit from a hearing aid have actually tried one, according to the U.S.

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • September 9, 2021
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  • Cardiac Arrest? Someday, Drones May Come to Save You

    A good Samaritan can save the life of someone in cardiac arrest if a portable defibrillator is nearby. Now, a pilot study suggests a new way to get the devices into bystanders' hands: drones.

    The study, done in Sweden, found that drone delivery was a feasible way to get automated external defibrillators (AEDs) to the scene of a cardiac arrest. In fact, the drones typically beat ambulances...

    FDA Approves First Nerve-Stimulation Device to Aid Stroke Recovery

    A first-of-a-kind nerve stimulation treatment for people who have problems moving their arms after a stroke has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

    "People who have lost mobility in their hands and arms due to ischemic stroke are often limited in their treatment options for regaining motor function," explained Dr. Christopher Loftus. He is acting director of the FDA's ...

    Could Electrode 'Pulses' Cut Back, Leg Pain Without Drugs?

    A new approach to spinal cord stimulation may drastically reduce chronic back pain, a small pilot study suggests.

    The study, of 20 patients with stubborn low back pain, tested the effects of implanting electrodes near the spinal cord to stimulate it with "ultra-low" frequency electrical pulses.

    After two weeks, 90% of the patients were reporting at least an 80% reduction in their pa...

    Smart Phones, Watches Can Mess With Implanted Pacemakers

    Do you have an implanted defibrillator or pacemaker? Try keeping your smart watch or smart phone a few inches away from them.

    New research from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration finds that your phone or watch could interfere with implanted heart devices.

    Based on the new findings, heart patients and health care providers should be aware of potential risks, the research team...

    At-Home Saliva Test Can Spot COVID Variants

    Spit and scan. That's all you have to do, and in less than an hour, you can not only find out if you have COVID-19 but what variant you have, all without leaving your home.

    This is the hope and promise of a new saliva-based COVID-19 test that is currently under development.

    "Several at-home tests are available for telling you whether you have COVID-19, but none of them test for vari...

    Stroke Prevented His Speech, But Brain Implant Brought It Back

    Researchers have developed an implant that allowed a man with severe paralysis to "speak" again by translating his brain signals into text.

    The achievement is the latest step in "brain-computer interface" (BCI) research.

    Scientists have been studying BCI technology for years, with the aim of one day giving people with paralysis or limb amputations greater independence in their daily...

    Busted Ankle? What's Better, a Cast or Brace?

    Modern, flexible boots may be just as good as old-school plaster casts when it comes to treating broken ankles, new research suggests.

    Often related to sports, traffic accidents or falls, broken ankles can be simple breaks in one bone or more complicated fractures that involve several bones, according to the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. Ankle fractures don't always require su...

    5-Minute Daily Breathing Exercise May Equal Meds in Lowering Blood Pressure

    A quick daily "workout" for the breathing muscles may help people lower their blood pressure to a similar degree as exercise or even medication, a small study suggests.

    The technique is called inspiratory muscle strength training (IMST), and it involves using a device that provides resistance as the user inhales -- essentially working out the diaphragm and other breathing muscles.

    R...

    Gene-Based Embryo Selection: Are 'Designer Babies' on the Horizon?

    The notion of parents picking out genetically perfect babies may seem like science fiction, but bioethicists warn in a new report that some companies have already started to offer couples going through in vitro fertilization (IVF) the means to pick better embryos through polygenic scoring.

    Polygenic scores are a "weighted average of the contributions of all of the genes we have informatio...

    CRISPR Therapy Fights Rare Disease Where Protein Clogs Organs

    Early research suggests that CRISPR gene-editing technology may some day lead to dramatic relief for patients struggling with amyloidosis, a rare but serious disease that can trigger organ failure.

    "There are many different types of amyloidosis," explained study author Dr. Julian Gillmore, a researcher in medicine with the Centre for Amyloidosis and Acute Phase Proteins at University Coll...

    Kids Born Through Fertility Treatments Have No Higher Cancer Risk

    Good news for couples considering fertility treatments: Children born through assisted reproductive technology (ART) don't have an increased risk of cancer, researchers say.

    In the new study, kids born through high-tech fertility treatments -- such as in vitro fertilization (IVF) and frozen embryo transfer (FET) -- were followed for 18 years on average.

    The results should be "quite ...

    Coming Soon: An Implanted Pacemaker That Dissolves Away After Use

    Researchers are reporting early success with a temporary heart pacemaker that simply dissolves when it's no longer needed.

    So far the work has been limited to animals and human heart tissue studied in the lab. But experts said the early findings are "exciting" and could eventually change the care of patients who need a pacemaker for only days to weeks.

    Pacemakers are devices that ar...

    How Secure Is Your Health or Fitness App?

    Your health and fitness apps may have privacy issues that put your personal information at risk, researchers warn.

    "This analysis found serious problems with privacy and inconsistent privacy practices in mHealth [mobile health] apps. Clinicians should be aware of these and articulate them to patients when determining the benefits and risks," lead study author Muhammad Ikram and his co-aut...

    His Implanted Microchip Could Help Save Him From a Stroke

    Norman Mayer, 86, walks around with a computer chip in his chest and doesn't think a thing about it.

    Doctors implanted a tiny heart monitor chip in Mayer's chest after he suffered a mini-stroke in late 2015, to track his heartbeat and potentially detect an irregular heart rhythm called atrial fibrillation (a-fib).

    "You don't even know it's there," said Mayer, the sitting mayor of th...

    Many Pre-Surgery Tests Are Useless, So Why Are Hospitals Still Using Them?

    Patients facing relatively simple outpatient surgeries are nonetheless being told to undergo a number of preoperative tests that just aren't necessary, a new study reports.

    More than half of a group of patients facing low-risk outpatient surgery received one or more tests -- blood work, urinalysis, an electrocardiogram (EKG), a chest X-ray -- prior to their operation.

    One-third of p...

    What Type of Stent Did I Get, Where? Most Heart Patients Don't Know

    When someone comes in for a new heart stent, it's critical that the medical team doing the procedure knows several key facts about previous stents the patient has had.

    But fewer than half of patients receiving a stent were still carrying the stent card that has those details with them, a new study finds.

    Most of them - about 88% - do carry their phones, according to study author D...

    Magnets in Cellphones, Smartwatches Might Affect Pacemakers, FDA Warns

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is warning that strong magnets in some cellphones and smartwatches can interfere with pacemakers and other implanted medical devices.

    Studies have shown that these high-strength magnets may cause some implants to switch to "magnet mode," stopping normal functioning until the magnet is moved away from the device.

    Many implants have a "magnet mode...

    'Mind-Reading' Technology Allows Paralyzed Man to Rapidly Text

    A microchip implanted in the brain has allowed a paralyzed man to communicate by text -- at speeds that approach the typical smartphone user.

    The achievement is the latest advance in "brain-computer interface" (BCI) systems.

    Scientists have been studying BCI technology for years, with the aim of one day giving people with paralysis or limb amputations greater independence in their ...

    Not Just About Antibodies: Why mRNA COVID Vaccines May Shield From Variants

    Two widely used COVID-19 vaccines -- Pfizer and Moderna -- will likely remain powerfully protective against developing serious illness even if coronavirus variants somehow manage to infect vaccinated patients, new research suggests.

    Both vaccines are based on messenger RNA (mRNA) technology. And investigators say that, at least in theory, such technology can deploy multiple levels of defe...

    'Heart-in-a-Box' Can Be Lifesaving, Matching Up Distant Donors With Patients

    A few days after his 74th birthday, Don Stivers received his dream gift -- a new heart.

    "I was born with a very lousy heart," he explained. "Growing up, I decided I was going to overcome it and go to the Olympics and be a strong boy. And so everything I did was against doctors' orders. They said don't run, don't do this, but I did anyway, and I would turn blue and pass out, and my mother...

    A Noninvasive Alternative for Painful Arthritic Knees

    For those who suffer painful arthritis in their aging knees, new research suggests a noninvasive treatment might deliver lasting relief.

    Called genicular artery embolization, the roughly two-hour catheter treatment involves a once-and-done injection of tiny hydrogel particles into arterial pathways in the knee joint. The goal: To decrease overall blood flow in the joint, and thereby marke...

    Can Fitbits Be a Dieter's Best Friend?

    Looking to shed some of those pandemic pounds? A new analysis says wearables like Fitbit and Apple Watch can help people slim down.

    The researchers examined studies involving commercial health wearables and adults who were overweight/obese or had a chronic health condition.

    After daily moderate-to-vigorous physical activity for a period between a month and a year, participants lost ...

    'Alexa, Is My Heartbeat Healthy?'

    One in four U.S. households use smart speakers to check the weather, play music and query search engines. But a new technology may soon have folks asking, "Hey Google, how's my heart?"

    Researchers from the University of Washington, Seattle, have developed a skill for Amazon Alexa and Google Home that allows the devices to check heart rhythms.

    Like a bat using echolocation to hunt fo...

    For Amputees, a New Kind of Surgery May Allow Better Control, Sensation

    A new type of surgery offers amputees better control of muscles that remain after surgery, and of their prosthetic limbs, its inventors say.

    The standard surgical approach to amputation has changed little since the American Civil War, according to developers of the new approach. In their small study, the new procedure also helped curb pain and sensations like the troubling "phantom limb" ...

    3D Mammograms Best at Spotting Tumors, But Many Black Women Missing Out

    Access to potentially lifesaving 3D mammography isn't equal, new research shows.

    "This study was about whether adoption of this technology is equitable. We're showing that it has not been, even though it has been [U.S. Food and Drug Administration]-approved for a decade now," said Dr. Christoph Lee. He is professor of radiology at the University of Washington School of Medicine, in Seattl...

    Grumpy? Depressed? Try a More Regular Sleep Schedule

    A steady sleep routine may do more than keep you well-rested: New research suggests that the more swings in your slumber schedule, the worse your mood and depression symptoms are likely to be.

    Researchers from Michigan Medicine followed the sleep patterns of interns in their first year of residency after medical school. That irregular sleep schedule can increase a person's risk of depress...

    COVID & Elevators: A Dangerous Mix, But Here's How to Make It Safer

    As the new coronavirus vaccine rollout gathers speed, elevators will likely become a flash point for businesses hoping to reopen offices while sticking to social distancing.

    And a new computer simulation suggests that the usual "first-come, first-served" elevator routine is neither safe nor practical.

    "Now that vaccines are within reach, many buildings are slated for phased re-openi...

    FDA Approves 'Tongue Strengthening' Device for Certain Sleep Apnea Patients

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Friday approved the marketing of a new "tongue strengthening" device to cut down on snoring in patients with mild obstructive sleep apnea.

    Unlike devices used during sleep, this prescription device is used while awake, and is designed to stimulate and strengthen the tongue so that it doesn't collapse backward and obstruct the breathing airway durin...

    Researchers Use Computers and 'Exoskeletons' to Help Stroke Survivors

    Stroke survivor Ken Allsford focused intensely on how he wanted to bend his elbow.

    And then the robot exoskeleton attached to his left arm obeyed his unspoken command, moving his crippled limb.

    "It was a combination of exciting and trepidation, because sometimes nothing would happen," Allsford, 61, of Katy, Texas, recalled. "But when you actually see it move without actually making ...

    Some Americans Can't Access Telemedicine, Study Shows

    Telemedicine rapidly expanded during the COVID-19 pandemic as people turned to their phones and computers rather than leave their homes for health care.

    But some groups of people were left behind in the telemedicine boom, a new study reports.

    Middle-aged and older folks are much less likely to complete their scheduled telemedicine visits, as well as Medicaid recipients and those who...

    Health Care After COVID: The Rise of Telemedicine

    In late December, Dr. Ada Stewart asked her staff to check on a patient who had missed an appointment.

    She soon learned that the patient had no transportation for the 45-minute drive, so Stewart offered to conduct the appointment by phone instead.

    "It still accomplished so much. I was able to see how their diabetes was doing, how they were preparing for the holiday seaso...

    Most Kidney Patients OK With Getting Text Reminders on Care

    Adults living with kidney failure are receptive to using mobile devices to help with their care, according to a new study.

    Mobile health can provide many benefits for patients, especially for those whose care is complicated and who have dietary restrictions, researchers said. Whether people on dialysis are ready to incorporate mobile technology in their care would be a limiting factor.

    MRIs Might Be Safe for Patients With Implanted Heart Devices

    For years, people with implanted heart devices have been told they can't undergo MRI scans. But a new study adds to evidence that, with certain measures in place, the procedure is safe.

    The study focused on patients with older pacemakers and implantable defibrillators that were not designed to be more compatible with MRI scanners. The researchers found that when a particular protocol ...

    Accuracy of COVID-19 Antibody Tests Varies Widely, Study Finds

    Wide variation exists in the accuracy of commercial testing kits that check for antibodies against the new coronavirus, researchers say.

    Antibody tests can determine whether someone has had the virus in the past. For diagnosis at a later stage of illness or in cases of delayed-onset, antibody tests could also be an important part of hospital diagnosis, the study authors said in the ne...

    Artificial Pancreas Controls Diabetes in Kids 6 and Up, Clinical Trial Shows

    An artificial pancreas system is safe and effective at managing blood sugar levels in kids as young as age 6 with type 1 diabetes, according to a new study.

    The system uses a continuous glucose monitor (CGM) to track blood sugar levels and automatically delivers insulin when needed using an insulin pump. It replaces reliance on fingerstick or CGM with delivery of insulin by injection ...

    Special Contact Lenses Can Help Curb Nearsightedness in Kids

    Kids suffering from nearsightedness can slow the progression of their myopia by using soft bifocal contact lenses, a new trial shows.

    Bifocal contacts with a powerful corrective prescription slowed the progression of nearsightedness in youngsters by 43% compared to single-vision contacts, the results showed.

    "The higher the reading portion of the contact lens, the better...

    Telemedicine Is Here: Experts Offer Tips for Seniors

    Virtual medical visits have been invaluable for many during the COVID-19 pandemic, but older adults may still need help managing them -- especially if they are hard of hearing.

    That's according to doctors at Johns Hopkins University, in Baltimore. Writing in the Aug. 11 Annals of Internal Medicine, they offer some practical advice on navigating "telemedicine."

    First a...

    Many Older Adults Can't Connect With Telehealth: Study

    The coronavirus pandemic has fueled big increases in video visits between patients and doctors, but older Americans haven't easily taken to the trend, a new study finds.

    More than one-third of those over 65 face difficulties seeing their doctor via telemedicine -- especially older men in remote or rural areas who are poor, have disabilities or are in poor health.

    "Telemedi...