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HPV Vaccine Is Also Preventing Cancers in Men: Study

Development and uptake of the human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccine has been crucial in reducing rates of virus-linked cervical cancers in women.

Now, the accumulated data suggests the vaccine is saving men from fatal cancers, too.

Overall, men who got the vaccine [typically as boys]...

Deadly GallBladder Cancers Rising Among Black Americans

Gallbladder cancer rates are steadily increasing among Black Americans, even as they remain stable or decline for most other Americans, a new study warns.

Further, growing numbers of cases among Black people are not being diagnosed until later stages, according to the f...

Fertility Treatments Safe for Breast Cancer Survivors With Cancer-Linked Genes

Fertility treatments such as in vitro fertilization (IVF) and other methods don't boost the odds for tumor recurrence in young women who've survived breast cancer and carry the BRCA cancer genes, a reassuring, new report finds.

The issue had been in question because breast tissue can be sensitive to hormones and many assisted reproductive techniques (ARTs) involve a temporary boost...

Most Cancer Treatments Near End of Life Are Useless: Study

Cutting-edge cancer treatments are essentially useless for patients barely clinging to life, a new study shows.

Chemotherapies, immunotherapies, targeted therapies and hormone therapies do not improve survival rates in patients with very advanced tumors near the end of life, according to findings...

Plant-Based Diets Lower Risk of Heart Trouble, Cancer and Death

Following a vegetarian or vegan diet might just buy you a longer, healthier life, a new review finds.

Staying away from meat was tied to a reduced risk of heart disease, cancer and early death, researchers reported in a study published Wednesday in the journal PLOS One.

After combing through nearly 50 studies on ...

Report Highlights Big Gaps in Cancer Outcomes Based on Race

U.S. cancer death rates are continuing to drop, falling by 33% between 1991 and 2020.

However, not all Americans are reaping the benefits from advances in cancer prevention, early detection and treatment, a new report from the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) shows.

Race, location and sexuality all play a role in cancer disparities across the United States, according ...

Patients Over 80 Still Benefit From Treatment for AML Blood Cancer

Seniors over 80 with acute myeloid leukemia can safely and effectively take the standard targeted therapy for the blood cancer, a new study finds.

The oral drug venetoclax is typically given to older AML patients whose bodies can’t handle the rigors of chemotherapy. The drug targets a protein i...

Melanoma Can Strike Black Americans, Often With Deadlier Results

Melanoma, while rare among Black Americans, is often detected later with devastating consequences, a new study finds.

Black people are frequently diagnosed with melanoma at later stages, increasing their risk of death compared to fairer-skinned patients, researchers found.

Advanced stage 3 mela...

His Cancer Journey Shows Health Dangers Firefighters Face

For 14 years, David Perez fought fires in South Florida, thinking he was in peak physical shape. Then a routine physical turned up anomalies in his blood work that turned his life upside down.

"The labs came back irregular. Everything was off," Perez, 44, recalled. “I went to a hematologist and it wasn’t until I saw the word cancer on the side of the building that I realized I might h...

Cancer Patients Often Face Medical Debt, Even With Insurance

When cancer strikes, you could easily go into debt, even with health insurance in place, according to a new survey from the American Cancer Society.

The survey, based on responses from nearly 1,300 cancer patients and survivors from March 18 through...

Telehealth Tougher When English Isn't First Language

Telehealth is revolutionizing health care in America by making it easier than ever to reach a doctor – but not everyone is benefitting, a new study reports.

People with limited English skills are more likely to have worse experiences with telehealth visits than people whose first language is English.

Folks who struggle with English were 40% more likely to rate video health care vi...

That 'New Car Smell' Could Be Toxic Carcinogens

“New car smell” is a beloved benefit of buying a new vehicle.

However, at least part of that scent could be due to toxic carcinogens released by flame retardants, a new study says.

Flame retardant chemicals added to seat foam and other car components pollute the cabin air inside all personal vehicles, according to findings published in the journal Environmental Science &...

A Third of Young Adults Still Believe 'Tan Is Healthier' Myth: Survey

Brianna Starr, 29, didn’t think twice about sunbathing without sunscreen, hoping to get a golden tan that to many connotes health and beauty.

But when her sister was diagnosed with melanoma at the age of 19, she got serious about protecting her skin health, says

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • May 2, 2024
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  • MRNA Vaccine Fights Deadly Brain Tumor in Small Trial

    An experimental cancer vaccine can quickly reprogram a person’s immune system to attack glioblastoma, the most aggressive and lethal form of brain cancer, a small, preliminary study has found.

    The cancer vaccine is based on mRNA technology similar to that used in COVID vaccines, but in this case a patient’s own tumor cells are used to create a personalized vaccine, researchers said.

    Americans of Pacific Island Ethnicity Have Up to Triple the Rate of Cancer Deaths

    Native Hawaiian and other Pacific Islander people have cancer death rates that are two to three times higher than they are in whites, new data shows.

    The first-of-its-kind report, issued by the American Cancer Society (ACS) on May 1, focuses solely on the cancer risk of Americans who’ve descended from regions along the Pacific Rim, the ACS said.

    Cancer is the second-leading cause ...

    EPA Clamps Down on Deadly Toxin Found in Paint Strippers

    A toxin found in paint strippers that's responsible for 85 U.S. deaths over the past five decades will be phased out for many uses, under an Environmental Protection Agency rule finalized Tuesday.

    The cancer-causing solvent methylene chloride will still hav...

    King Charles Returns to Duties After Cancer Treatment

    Britain's King Charles III is back to resuming his royal duties following treatment for cancer, Buckingham Palace announced Friday.

    "His Majesty The King will shortly return to public-facing duties after a period of treatment and recuperation following his recent cancer diagnosis," the Palace said in a

  • Ernie Mundell HealthDay Reporter
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  • April 29, 2024
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  • Loneliness Can Shorten Lives of Cancer Survivors

    Cancer survivors in the throes of loneliness are more likely to die compared to those with companionship, a new study finds.

    Further, people who are the most lonely are the most likely to die, results show.

    “Loneliness, the feeling of being isolated, is a prevalent concern among cancer survivors,” said lead researcher

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • April 26, 2024
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  • Cancer Takes Tough Toll on Family Finances

    About six out of 10 working-age adults hit with a cancer diagnosis say it put real pressure on their financial survival, a new report finds.

    “Today’s findings reiterate the critical role access to affordable, quality care and paid family medical leave plays in reducing the financial toll of c...

    EPA Designates Two 'Forever Chemicals' as Hazardous

    Two common PFAS "forever chemicals" have been deemed hazardous substances by the Environmental Protection Agency.

    The new designation, enacted under the country's

  • Robin Foster HealthDay Reporter
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  • April 22, 2024
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  • Urine Test Might Spot Head-and-Neck Cancers Early

    A newly developed at-home urine test could potentially help doctors catch head and neck cancers earlier, a new study suggests.

    The test looks for tiny DNA fragments sloughed off by tumor cells, which pass from the bloodstream into urine through the kidneys, researchers ...

    U.S. Medical Drug Shortages Reach Record High

    Americans are facing more shortages of the drugs they need for medical care than ever before, a national pharmacy database shows.

    The American Society of Health-System Pharmacists (ASHSP) and the University of Utah Drug Information Service started tracking drug shortages as far back as 2001.

    Their latest

  • Ernie Mundell HealthDay Reporter
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  • April 15, 2024
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  • Seafood Can Pass on PFAS 'Forever Chemicals,' Study Finds

    Cancer-linked 'forever chemicals' made news this week, with the Biden Administration vowing to cut levels in the nation's tap water.

    New research finds that the chemicals, known as PFAS, can also contaminate the seafood Americans eat.

    No one i...

    Preventive Mastectomy Less Common for Black Women With Breast Cancer

    Black women with cancer in one breast are less likely than white women to have the healthy breast removed as well, a new study has found.

    Women with cancer affecting one breast often elect to have the other breast removed, for a variety of reasons, researchers said.

    But it appears Black women are less likely to be afforded that option, particularly in hospitals that largely treat wh...

    EPA Cracks Down on Toxins Threatening Those Living Near Chemical Plants

    Are you one of the estimated 104,000 Americans who lives within six miles of factories that spew organic chemicals into the air?

    New rules issued Tuesday by the Environmental Protection Agency might make your life healthie...

    Can Older Patients With Low-Risk Leukemia Quit Seeing Specialists?

    Some slow-growing cases of leukemia don't need constant surveillance by cancer specialists, a new study claims.

    Low-risk patients with slow-growing chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and no symptoms fared well even after they stopped seeing doctors for specialized blood tests, researchers report.

    The patients had fewer hospital visits, fewer infections and similar survival after thr...

    Adding Vaccine to Immunotherapy  for Liver Cancer Shows Promise in Early Trial

    A custom-made anti-tumor vaccine added to standard immunotherapy was twice as likely to shrink liver cancer as when a patient received immunotherapy alone, a new study shows.

    The vaccine could help liver cancer patients live longer, as fewer than one in 10 survive five years after their diagnosis, the researchers noted.

    In fact, about 8% of patients who received the new vaccine had ...

    Today's Young Adults Are Aging Faster, and That Might Help Spur Cancers

    Younger generations are aging more rapidly, and this could be leading to an increased risk of cancer, a new study says.

    People born in or after 1965 are 17% more likely to be experiencing accelerated aging compared to seniors born between 1950 and 1954, researchers found.

    That faster aging is associated with a higher risk of certain cancers among adults younger than 55, also known a...

    Many Cancer Drugs Still Unproven 5 Years After Accelerated Approval

    New research questions the effectiveness of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's accelerated drug approval program after finding that many cancer drugs remain unproven five years later.

    The study, published Sunday in the Journal of the American Medical Association and presented simultaneously at the Americ...

    Immunotherapy Before Surgery Might Boost Pancreatic Cancer Survival

    Pancreatic cancer patients may do better if they receive an immunotherapy drug as well as chemotherapy in preparation for surgery, new research suggests.

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the toughest to treat. Only 12% of patients live more than five years after diagnosis. Most therapies -- including chemo, targeted therapies and immunotherapies -- are unsuccessful.

    For this study, rese...

    Cancer Cases Set to Soar 77% by 2050, Thanks to Aging Population

    As the world's population ages, a new report warns that the number of people with cancer could climb 77% by 2050.

    In the report, published Thursday in the journal CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians, researchers from the American Cancer Society found there were about 20 million cancer cases and ...

    Cancer Cases Will Keep Rising Worldwide: Report

    Cancer cases will continue to climb for the next two decades, spurred on by an aging worldwide population, a new report shows.

    An estimated 20 million new cancer cases were diagnosed in 2022, and 9.7 million died from cancer around the globe, the Global Cancer Statistics 2024 report from the American Cancer Society found.

    By 2050, the number of cancer cases is predicted to ...

    1 in 5 U.S. Cancer Patients Join in Medical Research

    More patients these days are taking part in cancer research, a new study finds.

    At least one in five people with cancer (22%) participate in some form of clinical research, when all types of cancer studies are considered, researchers found.

    Moreover, enrollment in cancer treatment trials wa...

    Catherine, Princess of Wales, Announces She Has Cancer

    Catherine, Princess of Wales, announced Friday that she has been diagnosed with cancer and has begun chemotherapy treatments.

    The news, which she disclosed in a video released by Kensington Palace, came after days of speculation about her health. It follows the disclosure in February that King Charles has cancer, announced after he ha...

    AI Can Help or Hinder a Radiologist's Accuracy, Study Finds

    Artificial intelligence tools don't always help radiologists better review a patient's X-rays or CT scans, a new study claims.

    AI has been touted as a potential means of improving doctors' ability to interpret medical images, the researchers said.

    However, the benefits of AI vary from ...

    EPA Issues Final Rule Banning Asbestos

    The last remnants of asbestos use in the United States have now been banned by the Environmental Protection Agency.

    While the known carcinogen has already been largely banned, the EPA

  • Ernie Mundell HealthDay Reporter
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  • March 18, 2024
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  • Vitamin D Plus Calcium: Good News, Bad News for Older Women

    Women who've gone through menopause and hope that supplemental vitamin D plus calcium might shield them from disease may be disappointed by new data.

    A follow-up analysis of data from the landmark Women's Health Initiative trial found the supplement combo lowered a woman's long-term odds of dying from cancer by 7%.

    However, it also raised her odds of fatal heart disease by 6%.

    ...

    'Ultra-Processed' Foods Harm Your Health in More Than 30 Different Ways

    Ultra-processed foods can cause dozens of terrible health problems among people who eat them too often, a new review warns.

    Researchers linked diets high in ultra-processed foods to an increased risk of 32 separate illnesses. In particular, these foods are strongly tied to risk with early death, heart disease, cancer, mental health disorders, overweight and obesity, and type 2 diabetes, r...

    Radon a Bigger Threat to Rural Homes

    Rural homeowners face a greater threat from odorless, radioactive radon gas than people living in urban areas, and it's likely due to the wells they rely on for their water supply, a new study shows.

    On average, people living in rural communities are exposed to 30% higher residential radon levels than people in cities and suburbs, researchers found.

    This radon appears to be seeping ...

    New Drug Could Be Big Advance Against Rare Blood Cancer

    Polycythemia vera is a rare form of blood cancer with few good treatment options, but that may soon change based on the results of a new clinical trial.

    An injected experimental drug called rusfertide appears effective in reducing the excess production of red blood cells that's a hallmark of the disease.

    “Rusfertide appears to represent a significant step forward in treating polyc...

    Families of Infertile Men Face Higher Cancer Risks

    A deficiency or absence of viable sperm in a man's semen could spell danger for him and those closely related to him, new research suggests.

    Cancers are more likely to occur in these men and their families, reports a team led by Dr. Joemy Ramsay, an assistant professor at Utah University in Salt Lake City.

    The exact ...

    New Treatment Brings Hope for Rare, Deadly  Cancer Linked to Asbestos

    Mick worked in a factory boiler room in the 1970s, where he was exposed to asbestos.

    He didn't think much of it until 2018, when he began to feel ill and dropped more than 40 pounds.

    The diagnosis: malignant mesothelioma, a rare but rapidly fatal cancer linked to asbestos.

    “It was a bit of a shock: I was given four months to live,” Mick recalled in a Queen Mary University ...

    Immunotherapy Before Sarcoma Surgery Improves Outcomes

    • Patients with soft-tissue sarcoma had better surgical outcomes if they received immunotherapy and radiation therapy prior to their procedure, a new clinical trial reports.

      Soft-tissue sarcoma is a cancer that develops in soft tissues like fat, muscle, nerves, fibrous tissues and blood vessels.

      More than 90% of patients with a form of soft-tissue sarcoma called undifferentiat...

    Exercise Can Be a Painkiller for Cancer Patients

    Being active may help ease ongoing cancer pain.

    That's the key takeaway from a study of more 10,600 people with a history of cancer and over 51,000 without the disease.

    A team led by Erika Rees-Punia of the American Cancer Society and

  • Carole Tanzer Miller HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 12, 2024
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  • Many Cancer Patients With Heart Issues Also Have Sleep Apnea

    Sleep apnea appears to be linked to an increased risk of heart failure among cancer patients, a new study says.

    Obstructive sleep apnea occurs when relaxed muscles cause a blockage of the windpipe, interrupting breathing and causing a person to temporarily wake.

    The new study involved 296 general heart patients and 218 cancer patients with heart problems, researchers said.

    Sle...

    Financial Troubles Could Lead to Cancers Diagnosed at Later Stage

    Folks squeezed financially may find themselves shut out from medical care, leading to delayed cancer diagnoses, a new report finds.

    A full third of cancer patients suffered some form of recent financial hardship -- a bankruptcy, lien or eviction -- prior to their diagnosis, according to research led by the American Cancer Society and the U.S. National Cancer Institute.

    These patient...

    King Charles III Diagnosed With Cancer

    Follow-up from recent surgery for an enlarged prostate has revealed that Britain's King Charles III has cancer, Buckingham Palace announced Monday.

    The palace did not disclose the type of cancer that was discovered.

    "During The King's recent hospital procedure for benign prostate enlargement, a separate issue of concern was noted," the palace said in a

  • Ernie Mundell HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 5, 2024
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  • More Cancers Linked to Contaminated Water at Camp LeJeune

    A much anticipated government study finds that military personnel stationed at Camp Lejeune in North Carolina between 1975 and 1985 face at least a 20% higher risk for certain cancers than those stationed elsewhere.

    Why the increased risk?

    For decades, the drinking water at the Marine Corps base was contaminated with industrial solvents,

  • Robin Foster HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 1, 2024
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  • Losing Weight for No Reason? See Your Doctor

    If you ever find yourself losing weight, even though you're not dieting or upping your exercise, go see a doctor. It can be a sign of cancer, researchers report.

    “Unexpected weight loss can come from cancer or many other conditions,” said study senior author Dr. Brian Wolpin. He directs the Gastrointestinal Cancer ...

    FDA Warns of Rare Secondary Cancer Risk With CAR-T Therapies

    WEDNESDAY, Jan. 24, 2024 (Healthday News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has told drugmakers to add a boxed warning to a type of cancer treatment called CAR-T therapy, saying the treatment itself may sometimes cause a secondary cancer.

    Still, FDA spokesperson Carly Kempler told NBC News

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