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Health News Results - 250

Carbon Monoxide Deaths Soar During Power Outages

MONDAY, Jan. 17, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- Power outages are becoming more frequent in the United States, and a new study highlights one consequence of prolonged blackouts: carbon monoxide poisonings.

Looking at major U.S. power outages between 2007 and 2018, researchers found that carbon monoxide poisonings spiked during those disruptions, versus the days immediately be...

Could Binge Drinking Set Your Heart Rhythm Off-Kilter?

Binge drinking on Super Bowl Sunday or other special occasions could put you at risk for a dangerous heart rhythm disorder called atrial fibrillation (a-fib), even if you've never had it, researchers warn in a new study.

"Worldwide, alcohol is the most popularly consumed drug, and it now is clear that alcohol consumption is an important risk factor for atrial fibrillation," said senior au...

ERs Can Boost Efforts to Stamp Out Opioid Addiction

A program meant to encourage the use of a drug that can help people overcome opioid addiction led to dramatic increases in its use in emergency rooms, researchers report.

Buprenorphine is a medication that stabilizes opioid withdrawal and soothes cravi...

Heat Waves Bring Health Crises to the Homeless

Add heat waves to the many health threats facing homeless people.

Last year, the United States had 580,000 homeless people — 28% of them in California, where seven in 10 live outdoors. That's nearly nine times more than in any other state.

"The same weather that makes living unsheltered possible in California also exposes people experiencing homelessness to a higher risk of a wide...

Heat Waves Far More Frequent Now Than in 1980s

Large, simultaneous heat waves have become much more common in northern regions worldwide due to climate change and could have disastrous consequences, researchers warn.

The investigators also found that these concurrent heat waves are becoming larger and hotter.

"More than one heat wave occurring at the same time often has worse societal impacts than a single event," said lead stud...

Silent Killers: Space Heaters, Generators Bring Carbon Monoxide Danger

If you're among the many people who use space heaters and generators during the winter, you need to guard against fire and carbon monoxide (CO) hazards, the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) says.

In the United States, that's especially true for Black Amer...

Heart Transplant Successful in Young Man Who Survived Severe COVID-19

After nearly dying from a severe case of COVID-19, a young male patient received a successful heart transplant even as he was recuperating from his infection while on a ventilator, a new case study reports.

The transplant was performed on the 31-year-old patient at the Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein in Sao Paulo, Brazil, in May.

It's one of the first cases of its kind in the wor...

Holidays Are Peak Time for Heart Attack: Protect Yourself

This time of year can be hard on the heart.

The United States has more heart attack deaths between Christmas and New Year's Day than at any other time of year, so the American Heart Association (AHA) offers some holiday health tips.

"The holidays are a busy, often stressful, time for most of us," said Dr. Donald Lloyd-Jones, volunteer president of the

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  • Certain Blood Thinners Can Raise Risk of 'Delayed' Bleeding After Head Injury

    Older blood thinners, especially when taken in combination with daily low-dose aspirin, are associated with a higher risk of brain bleeds and death after hospital discharge in patients treated for head injury, new research shows.

    The risk fell when patients were taking one of the newer blood thinners, said the authors of a study presented Tuesday at the annual meeting of the Radiological ...

    Hot Days Can Send Even Younger Folks to the ER

    Extreme heat brings a jump in emergency room visits by adults of all ages, a new study shows.

    While it's well known that extreme heat puts adults aged 65 and older at increased risk of hospitalization and death, it's been less clear how it affects young and middle-aged adults.

    To find out, the researchers analyzed the associations between heat and ER visits among more than 74 millio...

    Wearable Device Spots, Reverses Opioid Overdoses

    A wearable device that could inject a lifesaving antidote for an opioid overdose might be on the horizon.

    A new study shows that the device, worn on the stomach like an insulin pump, can detect when someone stops breathing from an overdose and inject the drug naloxone to restore breathing.

    "Fatal drug overdoses in the United States are at an all-time high, and opioid overdoses accou...

    Rural Hospitals' ERs Just as Effective as Urban Ones: Study

    If you live the country life, new research brings a reassuring finding: Your chances of surviving a heart attack, stroke or other potentially life-threatening medical emergency at a rural emergency department are similar to odds at a city ER in the United States.

    Researchers analyzed more than 470,000 outcomes among Medicare beneficiaries treated at rural and urban ERs between 2011 and 20...

    Low-Dose CT Scans Can Diagnose Appendicitis

    CT scans expose patients to radiation even as they help doctors spot serious health problems. Now a new study finds low-dose scans can readily spot appendicitis while reducing patients' radiation exposure.

    "The results of this study suggest that the diagnostic CT scan radiation dose can be significantly decreased without impairing diagnostic accuracy," said lead study author Paulina Salmi...

    Firefighters' Blood Pressure Can Rise When Duty Calls

    Working in an already dangerous environment, the blood pressure of firefighters jumps when they get an emergency call, new research shows.

    That could be risky for those who already have high blood pressure, experts say.

    "All emergency and first responders should be aware of their health," said senior author Deborah Feairheller, director of the clinical cardiac program at the Univer...

    No 'Fall Back'? Sleep Experts Argue Against Daylight Standard Time

    Most folks groan when the time comes to either "spring forward" or "fall back" an hour, with the waxing and waning of daylight saving time.

    But that one-hour time shift — which occurs at 2 a.m. Sunday — is more than just a minor annoyance, sleep experts say.

    Research has shown that deliberately messing with our internal clock twice a year increases our risk of accident, illness ...

    Guard Dogs, Panic Buttons: Nurses Under Threat From Rising Violence

    Emergency room nurse Grace Politis was catching up on paperwork during her shift when she suddenly realized her head hurt badly. Then she blacked out.

    "Later on, I found out I was hit in the head twice with a fire extinguisher by a patient," said Politis, who works at Lowell General Hospital in Lowell, Mass.

    A disturbed man awaiting psychiatric evaluation had fractured Politis' skul...

    The No. 1 Cause of Halloween Injuries: Carving the Pumpkin

    Your Jack-o'-Lantern may be more than scary — it could be dangerous.

    Pumpkin carving is the leading cause of injuries associated with Halloween, according to the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission.

    Between October and November 2018 in the United States, 44% of Halloween-linked injuries were connected with pumpkin-carving activities.

    More than one-quarter of Halloween-re...

    Moving Monoclonal Antibody Treatments for COVID From Hospital to Home

    Antibody infusions help keep high-risk COVID-19 patients out of the hospital, but getting the therapy can be a challenge. One U.S. health system has found a creative way to address the problem: home infusions administered by paramedics.

    Researchers found that the tactic was feasible, delivering antibody infusions to 144 COVID-19 patients in their homes over three months earlier this year....

    Heart Defibs in Schools Are Saving Staff Lives: Study

    Adult staff in schools are more likely than students to suffer sudden cardiac arrest, but automated external defibrillators (AEDs) are often used and improve the chances of survival, a new study finds.

    AEDs are portable devices that deliver an electric shock to try and restart the heart. If appropriate action isn't taken immediately, cardiac arrest is often fatal.

    "Most research on ...

    Pandemic Saw Rise in Kids Swallowing Magnets, Tiny Batteries

    More kids swallowed small magnets and batteries in 2020 compared to previous years -- a worrisome surge that dovetailed with pandemic stay-at-home orders.

    An analysis of data from more than 100 U.S. hospitals found that the number of kids 17 and younger who were treated for swallowing foreign objects remained about the same from 2017 to 2021, but there was a large jump in incidents involv...

    For Kids, Accidental Burns Another Scar of the Pandemic

    Accidental burns among U.S. children rose by one-third during the first months of the COVID-19 pandemic, according to a new study.

    "COVID-19 and stay-at-home orders inevitably created a new dynamic between children and their social environment. One result was the increased risk of burns those children experienced," said Dr. Christina Georgeades, a study author and pediatric surgery resear...

    Big Rise in Injuries From E-Scooters, Hoverboards

    Hoverboards, electric scooters and electric bikes are the transportation of choice for a growing number of Americans, but they're taking many straight to the emergency room.

    Injuries associated with these so-called "micromobility products" skyrocketed 70% between 2017 and 2020, according to a soon-to-be-released report from the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC).

    That in...

    Neighborhood Gun Violence Means Worse Mental Health for Kids

    Living within a few blocks of a shooting increases the risk that a child will end up visiting the emergency department for mental health-related problems, researchers say.

    The new study found significant increases in mental health-related ER visits in the two weeks after a neighborhood shooting, especially among kids who lived closest to it and those exposed to multiple shootings.

    "...

    When Cardiac Arrest Strikes, Survival Odds Are Better at Airports

    If you have a cardiac arrest, your odds of survival are best in an airport or airplane, a new study finds.

    That's because automated external defibrillators (AEDs) are readily available and so are people ready to help, researchers explained.

    "Our findings emphasize that cardiac arrest in travelers is survivable and that early resuscitation interventions matter," said lead researcher ...

    9/11 First Responders Face Higher Cancer Risk 20 Years Later

    Twenty years on, responders to the World Trade Center attacks in New York City are showing increased risks of certain cancers, two new studies confirm.

    Researchers found higher-than-average rates of prostate cancer among firefighters, medics and other workers who toiled at the disaster site on and after Sept. 11, 2001.

    And compared with firefighters from other major U.S. cities...

    Time Is Brain: Mobile Stroke Units Reduce Disability, Study Finds

    Every second counts after having a stroke, and rapid-response mobile stroke units can start clot-busting drugs quickly, potentially staving off lasting damage, new research finds.

    Mobile stroke units are special ambulances equipped with imaging equipment and staffed by experts who can diagnose and treat strokes in the moments before arriving at the hospital. Typically, people who may have...

    Early Responders to 9/11 Now Face Higher Odds for COPD

    Twenty years after the 9/11 attacks on the World Trade Center, researchers report that early recovery workers and volunteers have a high risk for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

    A study of nearly 18,000 workers and volunteers found that those who arrived soon after the Twin Towers collapsed in 2001 face the greatest risk of COPD.

    "We know that emergency workers who arr...

    Safeguarding Your Heart During, After Hurricane Ida

    Along with other dangers, the aftermath of Hurricane Ida could pose significant heart health risks.

    Stress and trauma from the storm that slammed into Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama and other states could increase heart risk, and the impact may be more significant for heart disease and stroke patients, the American Heart Association (AHA) warns.

    For example, it may be more difficul...

    Cardiac Arrest? Someday, Drones May Come to Save You

    A good Samaritan can save the life of someone in cardiac arrest if a portable defibrillator is nearby. Now, a pilot study suggests a new way to get the devices into bystanders' hands: drones.

    The study, done in Sweden, found that drone delivery was a feasible way to get automated external defibrillators (AEDs) to the scene of a cardiac arrest. In fact, the drones typically beat ambulances...

    Toppling TVs, Furniture Sending Many Young Children to ERs

    It can happen in an instant. A young child climbs a heavy piece of furniture, and it topples over on the toddler.

    New research suggests that's not as rare as you might think: Hundreds of thousands of children have been treated in U.S. emergency rooms for such injuries in recent decades.

    "Some families may not think that heavy furniture or TVs can tip over, but they do, and when this...

    Barnacles Inspire a Better Way to Seal Off Wounds

    Barnacles may be the bane of ships, but they could point to new ways to quickly halt severe bleeding, researchers report.

    Barnacles are small crustaceans that attach to rocks, ship hulls and even other animals, such as whales. Their ability to cling to surfaces that are often wet and dirty caught the attention of researchers trying to find new ways to seal wounds in emergency situations.<...

    When Stroke Team Comes to Patients, Outcomes Improve

    Dispatching rapid-response medical teams to perform an emergency procedure on stroke patients significantly improves their chances of survival and a good recovery, according to a new study.

    Researchers assessed a pilot program in New York City where a mobile interventional stroke team (MIST) raced to ischemic stroke patients to perform a surgical procedure called endovascular thrombectomy...

    Women Less Likely to Get Best Care for Deadly Form of Stroke

    Women are less likely than men to get the most effective treatment for a serious type of stroke, new research shows.

    Emergent large vessel occlusion (ELVO) is a type of ischemic stroke caused when blockages in large blood vessels cut off significant blood flow to the brain.

    The most effective treatment to prevent long-term disabilities from this type of stroke is a minimally invasiv...

    Severe Opioid Overdoses Rose by Nearly a Third During Pandemic

    Opioid overdose-related visits to U.S. emergency departments rose by nearly one-third during the COVID-19 pandemic last year.

    That's the key finding in a new analysis of data from 25 emergency departments in Alabama, Colorado, Connecticut, North Carolina, Massachusetts and Rhode Island.

    "COVID-19, and the disruptions in every part of our social and work lives, made this situation ev...

    The Heat Is On: Staying Safe When Temperatures Soar

    Midsummer heat and high humidity aren't just uncomfortable -- they're a combo that can cause serious illness and even death.

    "Whenever you walk or do outdoor activity, take a friend with you who can help you if you run into trouble," Dr. Eleanor Dunham advised. She's an emergency medicine doctor at Penn State Health Milton S. Hershey Medical Center in Hershey, Pa.

    Babies and seniors...

    High-Dose Withdrawal Drug in ER Can Help Battle Opioid Addiction

    Giving high doses of buprenorphine in the emergency department is a safe and effective way of treating withdrawal symptoms in patients battling opioid addiction, according to a new study.

    "Emergency departments are at the front lines of treating people with opioid use disorder and helping them overcome barriers to recovery such as withdrawal," said Dr. Nora Volkow, director of the U.S. Na...

    Flu Shot Might Help Ward Off Severe COVID

    A flu shot might offer some protection against severe effects of COVID-19, a new study suggests.

    If you are infected with COVID-19, having had a flu shot makes it less likely you will suffer severe body-wide infection, blood clots, have a stroke or be treated in an intensive care unit, according to the study.

    "Our work is important," said study co-author Dr. Devinder Singh, noting l...

    Backyard Fireworks on the 4th?  Rethink It to Keep Your Child Safe

    If you're planning on shooting off fireworks on the 4th of July, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) urges you to find other ways to celebrate the holiday.

    "We know that sales of fireworks increased in 2020 as did injuries, so parents and caregivers need to be vigilant this 4th of July, and leave any fireworks to the professionals," Dr. James Dodington, a member of the executive comm...

    Fireworks Deaths Spiked in Pandemic; Stay Safe This 4th

    The COVID-19 pandemic likely played a role in the 50% increase in deaths from fireworks in the United States last year, the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) says.

    Many public fireworks displays were canceled last summer due to the COVID-19 pandemic. That led many people to light rockets, sparklers and firecrackers in their own backyards, the agency said.

    The result: A...

    COVID Can Be More Deadly for Hospitalized Trauma Patients

    Having a case of COVID-19 significantly increases hospitalized trauma patients' risk of complications and death, a new study finds.

    "Our findings underscore how important it is for hospitals to consistently test admitted patients, so that providers can be aware of this additional risk and treat patients with extra care and vigilance," said lead author Dr. Elinore Kaufman. She's assistant ...

    High Deductibles Keep Folks With Chest Pain From Calling 911

    The public health message has always been loud and clear: If you are experiencing a medical emergency such as chest pain, dial 911 or go to the nearest emergency room.

    But a new study shows that a $1,000 or higher deductible on your health insurance plan may serve as a deterrent to seeking care when you experience chest pain that could signal a heart attack.

    "Plans with high out-of-...

    Big Rise in Suicide Attempts by U.S. Teen Girls During Pandemic

    The suicide attempt rate has leapt by as much as half among teenage girls during the coronavirus pandemic, a new government study shows.

    Emergency room visits for suspected suicide attempts among girls between the ages of 12 and 17 increased by 26% during summer 2020 and by 50% during winter 2021, compared with the same periods in 2019, researchers from the U.S. Centers for Disease Contro...

    Summer Water Fun Can Bring Drowning Risks: Stay Safe

    As you seek to cool down in a pool or at the beach this summer, always keep water safety for yourself and others in mind, an expert urges.

    "With children, I always recommend starting swim lessons at an early age and having parents put on floaties or life vests on their children when near any water. Parents should also never let their kids swim alone without supervision and ensure they're ...

    ER Visits for Heart Attacks Rebounded After Pandemic Decline

    Emergency care for heart attacks and strokes rebounded in Northern California after initially plummeting in the early stages of the COVID-19 pandemic, researchers say.

    That's good news, suggesting that public health campaigns urging people to seek care if they had signs or symptoms of a stroke or heart attack were effective, according to the Kaiser Permanente researchers.

    For the s...

    Women Get Help Later Than Men When Heart Attack Strikes

    When young women land in the emergency room with chest pain, they wait longer and get less treatment than their male counterparts, a preliminary study finds.

    Using a federal survey of U.S. hospitals, researchers found that younger women with chest pain were treated less urgently than men their age. That included a lower likelihood of receiving standard tests for diagnosing a heart attack....

    Asthma Attacks Plummeted During Pandemic

    Call it a silver lining of the pandemic: Asthma attacks fell sharply among Black and Hispanic Americans in the months after the coronavirus first surfaced.

    The study included nearly 1,200 participants who provided information about their asthma through monthly online, phone or mail questionnaires for 15 months between the first half of 2019 and first half of 2020.

    The researchers f...

    1 in 4 Heart Attacks Arrive With 'Atypical' Symptoms

    A quarter of heart attack patients have atypical symptoms and are less likely to receive emergency care, Danish research reveals.

    These patients are also more likely to die within 30 days than those with chest pain.

    Atypical heart attack symptoms include breathing problems, extreme exhaustion and abdominal pain.

    "Atypical symptoms were most common among older people, especiall...

    1 in 4 U.S. Teens Has Had a Concussion: Study

    Nearly one in four American teens has suffered at least one concussion, according to new research.

    And though more teens are self-reporting sports-related concussions, visits to the emergency room for these traumatic head injuries fell between 2012 and 2018.

    "One reason that could explain why adolescents who participate in sports saw an increase in self-reported concussion could be ...

    Urgent Care or the ER? Which Should You Choose?

    Say you twist your ankle playing catch with your kids. Or maybe your daughter has a rash that's spreading. Do you visit urgent care or the hospital emergency department?

    Many cases of injury or illness can be handled at an urgent care clinic rather than a hospital emergency department, an expert says.

    "Urgent care is a good starting point, especially when you can't see your primary ...

    Americans Still Avoiding ERs in Pandemic, But Uptick Seen in Mental Health Crises

    While ER visits have stayed below normal levels as the coronavirus pandemic continues, the number of people showing up in the emergency department with mental woes is increasing, new federal government data shows.

    Between March 29 and April 25, 2020, visits to emergency departments dropped 42%, researchers from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found. Although the number...