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Results for search "Family".

02 Jun

More Young Adults Living With Mom and Dad…and Finding Ways to Make It Work

Researchers identify 4 things that make moving home a positive experience for adult children and their parents.

Health News Results - 138

As Holidays Return to Normal, Here's How to De-Stress

A return to a more normal holiday season may also mean higher stress levels, so an expert offers some coping tips.

Don't get too focused on buying the perfect presents, making the best dinner or planning the perfect party. Try to be mindful of pleasant things and moments, suggested Jennifer Wegmann, a health and wellness studies lecturer at Binghamton University, State University of New Y...

Give Others Help, Get Back Health Benefits: Study

When it comes to helping others and your health, it might be better to give than to receive, a new study suggests.

Researchers surveyed more than 1,000 Americans between 34 and 84 about their social involvement and how much they thought they could rely on their family, friends or a spouse if they needed help.

On a key measure of health -- chronic inflammation -- positive social rela...

During the Holidays, Help Protect the Elderly from Falls

A holiday visit with older relatives might be a good chance to help them remove fall risks in their home, an expert suggests.

Older adults' risk of falling may have increased during the pandemic due to declines in physical activity and mobility, along with increased isolation, a University of Michigan poll shows. Many also became more fearful of falling, which, in turn, can increase the r...

Most Parents Say Their Kids Aren't Thankful Enough: Poll

As American families sit down to celebrate Thanksgiving, a majority of parents say they want to raise grateful kids but they don't think they're succeeding.

Four out of five respondents to a new nationwide poll said children aren't as thankful as they should be, and half worry that they overindulge their own kids. Two in five also said they're sometimes embarrassed by how selfish their ch...

Many Kids Separated From Families at U.S. Border Suffer PTSD

Parents and children who were separated under the Trump administration's "zero tolerance" immigration policy have shown lasting psychological trauma -- even after being reunited, a new study finds.

Between 2017 and 2018, more than 5,000 children were separated from their parents at the U.S.-Mexico border under the policy, which aimed to deter asylum seekers.

The practice was denounc...

Grandmother's Brain In Sync With Her Grandkids': Study

Grandmothers can have a strong bond with the little children in their families — and the connection even shows up on brain scans, researchers say.

The investigators embarked on a unique study, looking at the brains of older women — not for signs of dysfunction, as with dementia, but to study their connections with their grandchildren.

"What really jumps out in the data is the ac...

Still Feeling Nervous About Holiday Gatherings? Survey Finds You're Not Alone

For Emily Litvin, this Thanksgiving is going to look different from the last one and she couldn't be happier about it.

"I'm so excited to have some sort of normalcy, especially for my daughter and her cousins. It's nice for them to all get together and experience the traditions that we grew up with," said Litvin, a schoolteacher who lives near Columbus, Ohio. "We're so excited."

But...

'6 Stages' Approach Might Help Families Coping With ADHD

Researchers have created a six-stage process to help families of children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) deal with the disorder.

"This framework is family-centered, focused on breaking down the barriers that families face from before diagnosis to preparing children with ADHD for the future," said Dr. Andrea Spencer, director of the Reach for ADHD Research Program at ...

Most Kids Newly Diagnosed With ADHD Aren't Getting Best Care

Preschoolers with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) rarely receive the gold-standard treatment recommended by the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) for their condition, a new study reports.

The AAP recommends a behavioral therapy technique called "parent training in behavior management," or PTBM, as first-line treatment for ADHD kids ages 4 and 5.

But only 1 of eve...

Sibling Bullying Carries Long-Term Mental Health Costs

Bullying by a brother or sister in childhood can have lasting effects, threatening mental health in the teen years, new British research suggests.

Researchers found that mental health was affected whether one was the bully or the victim.

"Of particular note was the finding that even those who bullied their siblings, but weren't bullied themselves [i.e. the bullies] had poorer mental...

Obesity a Threat to Adults With Autism, But There May Be Help

Eating well and exercising regularly can be a challenge for anyone. But for those with autism spectrum disorder or intellectual disabilities, that challenge is exponentially greater.

Many young men and women with autism and intellectual disabilities face a significantly higher risk for obesity, and all the health complications that follow.

Yet, a small, new pilot study suggests...

Witnessing Abuse of a Sibling Can Traumatize a Child

Seeing a parent abuse a sibling can be as traumatizing as watching a parent hurt another parent, a new study finds.

And it can lead to depression, anxiety and anger, researchers say.

"When we hear about exposure to family violence, we usually think about someone being the victim of direct physical abuse or witnessing spousal assault," said researcher Corinna Tucker. She is a profess...

Pandemic Changed Families' Eating Habits, for Good and Bad: Poll

Over the past year and a half, the coronavirus pandemic has remade so much of everyday life, including the foods families eat.

In many families, that's been a good thing, with half cooking at home more often and two-thirds making healthier food choices, according to a nationwide poll of U.S. parents. For about 20% of parents, many of whom said they felt stressed-out and busy, the pandemic...

Do Your Genes Up Your Odds for Alcoholism? One Factor Cuts the Risk

Even when genetics and personality are working against you, having a strong network of supportive friends and family may help lower alcoholism risk, researchers say.

"Genes play an important role in alcohol use," stressed Jinni Su, an assistant professor of psychology at Arizona State University in Tempe, and lead author of a new study.

But "genes are not our destiny," she added.

Having Even a Cousin or Grandparent With Colon Cancer Raises Your Risk: Study

Colon cancer risk runs in families, and it's not just a parent or sibling having had the disease that should concern you.

If you have a second- or third-degree relative who had colon cancer at an early age, your odds of having the disease substantially increase, a new study finds.

First-degree relatives include parents, children and siblings. Second-degree relatives include aunts, u...

Multigenerational Study Finds Links Between ADHD, Dementia Risk

Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) appears to be somehow linked to risk of dementia and Alzheimer's disease, a new multigenerational study has found.

Parents and grandparents of people with ADHD have a higher risk of Alzheimer's and dementia than people with no ADHD in their family, Swedish researchers said.

Specifically, parents of an ADHD child have a 34% higher risk ...

Could You Help Prevent a Suicide? Know the Warning Signs

Knowing the warning signs of suicide can save a life, experts say.

Suicide is the 10th leading overall cause of death in the United States, and number two among people between the ages of 10 and 34.

Most suicides result from depression. It can cause someone to feel worthless, hopeless and a burden on others, making suicide falsely appear to be a solution, according to the

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  • It's a Win-Win When a Child With Autism Gets a Shelter Cat

    Parents of a child with autism might wonder if a pet cat would be a good fit for the family. Now, research suggests both children with autism and cats benefit when a feline joins the household.

    Gretchen Carlisle, a research scientist at the Missouri University Research Center for Human-Animal Interaction, in Columbia, Mo., and her colleagues studied the pet dynamic from both sides.

    ...

    More College-Educated Women Are Having Children Outside of Marriage

    First comes love. Then comes marriage. Then comes baby in the baby carriage.

    While that childhood rhyme used to be true, college-educated women in the United States are now more likely than ever to have a first baby outside marriage. They're also more likely than other women to have a wedding ring by the time they have their second baby.

    "It suggests a change in the way that college...

    Having Someone Who'll Listen May Be Good for Your Aging Brain

    Could the constancy of a sympathetic ear help guard your brain against the ravages of aging?

    Yes, claims new research that analyzed data on nearly 2,200 American adults and found those in their 40s and 50s who didn't have someone to listen to them had a mental ("cognitive") age that was four years older than those who had good listeners in their lives.

    Having an ear to bend when you...

    Kids of Heavy Drinkers Face Multiple Threats to Health

    Death, injuries, abuse and mental health disorders are among the many harms faced by children whose parents are heavy drinkers, Danish researchers say.

    "Within the last 10 years, there has been an expansion of research on consequences that extend beyond the drinker," wrote lead author Julie Brummer, a doctoral student in psychology and behavioral sciences at Aarhus University, Denmark, an...

    Pandemic Has Depression, Anxiety Rates Among Youth Climbing Worldwide

    If you think the pandemic hasn't taken a toll on the mental health of young people, ponder these two facts from a new review: one in four are suffering from depression, while one in five are struggling with anxiety.

    "Being socially isolated, kept away from their friends, their school routines and extracurricular activities during the pandemic has proven to be difficult on youth," said lea...

    1.5 Million Kids Worldwide Lost Parent or Other Caregiver to COVID-19

    In yet another finding that illustrates the tragic toll the pandemic has taken on families around the world, a new study shows that 1.5 million children have lost a parent, grandparent or other caregiver to COVID-19.

    "For every two COVID-19 deaths worldwide, one child is left behind to face the death of a parent or caregiver. By April 30, 2021, these 1.5 million children had become the tr...

    Friends, Family Key to Turning a 'No' on Vaccination to a 'Yes'

    Public health officials and government workers are trying everything they can to promote COVID-19 vaccination -- advertisements, news releases, cash lotteries, and even incentives like free beer, joints or doughnuts in some places.

    But nothing sways a vaccine-hesitant person more than a word with a family member, friend or their own doctor, a new Kaiser Family Foundation (KFF) poll reveal...

    Spanish Spoken at Home? It Won't Slow Youngsters Learning English: Study

    Being in a Spanish-speaking home doesn't hamper American kids' ability to learn English, new research shows.

    The first-of-its-kind study included 126 U.S.-born 5-year-olds who were exposed to Spanish at home from birth, along with varying amounts of English.

    Researchers found that the kids not only learn English reliably, their total language knowledge is greater to the degree that...

    Innovative Kidney Donor 'Voucher' System Is Saving Lives

    In the world of chronic kidney disease, the dilemma is not uncommon: A relatively young patient with kidney trouble may need a transplant down the road, and an older family member is more than ready to step up. But the need for a kidney transplant, while predictable, is not immediate.

    So the older donor doesn't act. Given that donor supply has never met demand, the loss of a golden opport...

    Pandemic May Have Created a 'Baby Bust,' Not Boom

    The pandemic not only cost hundreds of thousands of American lives, but it also appears to have triggered a deep drop in births, U.S. health officials reported Wednesday.

    Until 2020, the birth rate had been declining about 2% a year, but that rate dropped to 4% with the start of the pandemic, researchers from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found.

    "When you tak...

    Survey Finds Many Adults Don't Want Kids -- and They're Happy

    Marriage and children may be the norm for most Americans, but a new study shows that many people are choosing to remain child-free -- and they're happy that way.

    The study of 1,000 Michigan adults found that one-quarter had opted not to have kids. And, on average, their life-satisfaction ratings were no different from those of parents or people who planned to have children.

    On one h...

    On Father's Day, Give Dad Tips to Keep Healthy

    Men tend to put their health care last, but Penn State Health offers some tips this Father's Day for ensuring guys stay healthy in the future.

    "Men tend to take care of their cars more frequently than they do themselves. But when men wait to see the doctor once their 'check engine' light comes on, they suffer major health problems that could've been prevented," said Dr. Eldra Daniels. He ...

    Not Ready for Post-Pandemic Mingling? Expert Offers Tips to Ease Anxiety

    While some people may be ready and eager to reconnect with family and friends at social gatherings post-pandemic, it's OK to feel apprehensive.

    As restrictions loosen because infection rates are plummeting and more people are getting vaccinated, many people are experiencing feelings that they didn't expect -- such as anxiety about returning to social situations, according to a psych servi...

    Will Pandemic Produce a Summer Baby Boom?

    America, get ready for a baby boom.

    That's the likelihood anyway, according to a new forecast that suggests a drop in pregnancy and birth rates seen during the early part of the COVID-19 pandemic is about to be reversed.

    "We expect a dramatic rebound soon," said study lead author Dr. Molly Stout. She is maternal fetal medicine director at Michigan Medicine Von Voigtlander Women's Ho...

    'Boomerang Kids': When an Adult Child Moves Back Home

    It's a scenario fraught with potential conflict: Moving back home as an adult can be tough - on both the grown children and their parents.

    But it can also come with opportunities, as long as expectations are established early, say some "boomerang kids" who moved back in with mom and/or dad after reaching adulthood.

    A new study interviewed 31 of those young adults, aged 22 to 31, who...

    Birth Order, Family Size May Affect Heart Health

    It's known that genetics and lifestyle can affect your heart health. Now, researchers say, your birth order and family size may also have an impact.

    A new Swedish study found that first-born children had a lower risk of heart attacks and strokes than their younger brothers and sisters. But having many siblings was associated with...

    Media, TV Time Doubled for Kindergartners During Pandemic

    When the COVID-19 pandemic kept young kids indoors, their time spent watching TV and other screens rose dramatically.

    That's the finding of a new study that investigated the screen time of kindergarteners from low-income families in Ohio. The researchers found that their use of television, video, movies, short clips, and apps or games on any electronic device topped six hours a day in May...

    Opioids After Dental Work May Be Dangerous

    Getting a prescription for an opioid painkiller from your dentist could put you or your family at risk for an overdose, a new study warns.

    The finding is based on an analysis of data from 8.5 million Americans who had teeth pulled or 119 other types of dental work between 2011 and 2018. All had Medicaid or private dental insurance.

    "Our paper shows that when patients fill dental opi...

    Despite Pandemic's Toll, Many Older Adults Don't Have Living Wills

    As the coronavirus pandemic continues in the United States, less than half of older Americans have legally stated their wishes should they become seriously ill, a new survey finds.

    People 50 and older are at increased risk for severe COVID-19, and the pandemic may be an opportunity for them to discuss health care issues with their family and document their preferences if they suffer sever...

    Do You 'Wolf Down' Your Food? Speedy Eaters May Pack on More Pounds

    Are you the type to linger over a meal, or do you tend to eat quickly without giving it much thought?

    New research confirms that you're better off going the slow route, because fast eaters tend to consume more and be more vulnerable to gaining weight and becoming obese. And it uncovers a new wrinkle: If you grew up with siblings, where you probably had to compete for whatever was on the t...

    More Kids With Autism May Be Doing Well Than Thought

    School-age children with autism may be faring better than commonly thought, with most "doing well" in at least some aspects of development, a new study suggests.

    The study, of 272 children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), found that nearly 80% were doing well in at least one of five developmental areas by age 10. Nearly one-quarter were doing well in four of those areas.

    The res...

    What Will Summer Camp Look Like This Year?

    Splashing in a pool. Hiking through fresh green forests. Making macaroni art. Stitching together a leather wallet. Knocking a kickball around.

    It's nearly time for summer camp, and the experience is expected to be especially important for America's children because of the pandemic.

    "We really feel like summer camps are a huge opportunity for kids to disconnect from screens that they...

    Furry Friends: 1 in 10 Older U.S. Adults Has Adopted a 'Pandemic Pet'

    It was bound to happen: As the pandemic wore on, many older Americans couldn't resist the urge to bring home a furry friend.

    According to a new poll from the University of Michigan, about 10% of all U.S. adults between the ages of 50 and 80 adopted a new pet between March 2020 and January 2021. That number was 16% for people aged 50 to 80 who have a child under 18 at home and 9% for those...

    Health Care Workers More Likely to Catch COVID at Home, Not Workplace

    Health care workers are more likely to catch COVID-19 at home or in their community than on the job, a new study finds.

    "The news is reassuring in that it shows the measures taken are working to prevent infections from spreading in health care facilities," said study co-author Dr. Anthony Harris. He's professor of epidemiology and public health at the University of Maryland School of Medi...

    Talking Points: People Rarely End Conversations When They Want To

    Ever been caught in small-talk you secretly wanted to end?

    So has nearly everyone else, according to new research that finds that both partners in a conversation often want it to end sooner than it does.

    The flip side is often true, as well. Study author Adam Mastroianni said that his team was "surprised to find that conversations also sometimes end beforeeither person want...

    When Kids Misbehave, 'Verbal Reasoning' Can Sometimes Backfire

    Most parents know that child behavior experts recommend against spanking, but new research suggests that so-called "positive" discipline methods don't always work either.

    For example, the common tactic of "verbal reasoning" with an unruly child "was associated with a mixed bag of outcomes, some positive and some negative," said study author Andrew Grogan-Kaylor. He's a professor of socia...

    Pandemic May Be Affecting How Parents Feed Their Kids

    There have been good and bad changes to U.S. children's diets during the COVID-19 pandemic, researchers say.

    "Providing healthy meals and snacks to our kids can be a challenge even when we're not experiencing a pandemic," said senior study author Susan Carnell. She's an associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, in Baltimo...

    COVID Vaccine Advised for Alzheimer's Patients, Their Caregivers

    All Alzheimer's disease patients and their family caregivers should be vaccinated against COVID-19, the Alzheimer's Foundation of America says.

    "Getting vaccinated is one of the most important steps families affected by Alzheimer's disease can take to protect themselves and their loved ones," said Dr. J. Wesson Ashford, chair of the foundation's medical, scientific and memory screening ad...

    You're More Likely to Maintain Social Distance If Your Friends Do: Study

    Family and friends can influence whether people follow social distancing recommendations during the coronavirus pandemic, a new study finds.

    British researchers analyzed information from more than 6,600 people in 114 countries. Those who thought their close social circle adhered to distancing guidelines were more likely to do the same, the analysis found.

    This influence outweighed w...

    The Family Cat Could Be Good Medicine for Kids With Autism

    Cats have a long history of boosting people's moods and brightening their days. And that's probably true for kids on the autism spectrum as well, new research shows.

    The small study suggests that adopting a shelter cat may help reduce separation anxiety and improve empathy in kids with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD).

    "Cats, and companion animals in general, offer uncond...

    If a Nursing Home Resident Gets a COVID Shot, Can Their Families Visit Them Now?

    People in nursing homes have been suffering in isolation during the coronavirus pandemic, with their institutions in constant lockdown to prevent potentially fatal outbreaks.

    Now that they're some of the first in line to receive COVID-19 vaccinations, it would be natural for nursing home residents to expect that visits from friends and family will soon resume.

    That might not happen,...

    How Divorce Harms Kids, and How to Lessen That Harm

    Kids who see their parents bicker during a separation or divorce are more likely to develop a fear of abandonment, new research warns.

    And even if a youngster feels close to one or both parents, that fear can still undermine his or her mental health down the road.

    The findings stem from interviews with roughly 560 kids between 9 and 18 years of age. Parents and teachers were also in...

    For Many Cancer Patients, Diagnosis Brings Psychological 'Silver Lining'

    Could a cancer diagnosis sometimes produce positive life changes? In a new study, many people with colon cancer, even in advanced stages, believed their diagnosis had brought some beneficial effects to their lives.

    In surveys of 133 colon cancer patients, researchers found that nearly all -- 95% -- said their lives had benefited in some way since their diagnosis. Often, they felt their f...

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