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15 Jul

HealthDay Now: Insulin Access

As the American Diabetes Association celebrated the 100th anniversary of the discovery of insulin, HealthDay spoke to to Dr. Robert Gabbay, chief scientific and medical officer of the group. Dr. Gabbay shared his thoughts on how to make insulin affordable and accessible to everyone who needs it.

Health News Results - 495

Your Plant-Based Diet Could Really Help the Planet

Worried about climate change? You can do something about it every time you lift your fork, a new study suggests.

Folks can reduce their personal carbon footprint by eating less red meat, nibbling fewer sweets and cutting back on tea, coffee and booze, according to the findings.

"We all want to do our bit to help save the planet," said senior researcher Darren Greenwood, a senior le...

Many Kids, Teens Think Girls Don't Care About Computer Science

The misconception that girls are less interested than boys in computer science and engineering begins at a young age in the United States.

And it's one reason for the gender gap in those career fields, according to a new study.

In surveys of more than 2,200 U.S. children and teens in grades 1 through 12, researchers found that half 51% believed girls are ...

As Holidays Return to Normal, Here's How to De-Stress

A return to a more normal holiday season may also mean higher stress levels, so an expert offers some coping tips.

Don't get too focused on buying the perfect presents, making the best dinner or planning the perfect party. Try to be mindful of pleasant things and moments, suggested Jennifer Wegmann, a health and wellness studies lecturer at Binghamton University, State University of New Y...

1 in 5 Avoided Health Care During Pandemic, Study Finds

One in five adults avoided seeking health care during the COVID-19 pandemic, even when they had symptoms suggesting the need for urgent medical attention, according to researchers in the Netherlands.

"Health care avoidance during COVID-19 may be prevalent amongst those who are in greater need of it in the population, such as older individuals," a team led by Silvan Licher, of Erasmus Univ...

Housework Might Boost Your Body & Mind

TUESDAY, Nov. 23, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Seniors, looking for a way to stay mentally quick and physically strong? Start scrubbing.

Researchers from Singapore say housework may be a key to keeping your brain sharp as you age.

Their new study found that in older adults, cl...

'Active Grandparent': Humans Evolved to Exercise in Old Age

Becoming a couch potato as you get older goes against evolution and puts your health at risk, a new study suggests.

Humans have evolved to be active in their later years, and staying active can protect against heart disease and a number of other serious health problems, according to researchers at Harvard.

"It's a widespread idea in Western societies that as we get older, it's norma...

Ridesharing Services May Be Lowering Drunk Driving Deaths

MONDAY, Nov. 22, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Don't drive drunk. That's simple and obvious advice. And it appears ridesharing services are making it easier for people to take it.

In a new study that looked at Chicago data, more rideshare trips meant fewer alcohol-involved crashes.

"This study was designed to look specifically at drunk driver crashing," said study auth...

Most Parents Say Their Kids Aren't Thankful Enough: Poll

As American families sit down to celebrate Thanksgiving, a majority of parents say they want to raise grateful kids but they don't think they're succeeding.

Four out of five respondents to a new nationwide poll said children aren't as thankful as they should be, and half worry that they overindulge their own kids. Two in five also said they're sometimes embarrassed by how selfish their ch...

Pandemic Curbed Kids' Efforts to Lose Excess Weight

FRIDAY, Nov. 19, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- A new study is highlighting yet another consequence of the COVID-19 pandemic: It has likely made it even harder for kids with obesity to manage their weight.

The findings, researchers said, are no surprise. Many adults, faced with normal life bei...

Teen Social Media Posts About Cutting, Other Self-Harm Are Soaring

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 17, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- American teens are increasingly turning to the social media giant Instagram to share graphic images of their own attempts to harm themselves, a new study reveals.

"It could be an attempt to share their emotional or psychological pain with others or find support from others," said study lead author Amanda Giordano. She is an a...

As Countries Become More Tolerant, Suicides Among Gay Men Decline

A new study confirms that when a country is more accepting of people who are LGBTQ, fewer gay or bisexual men take their own lives.

In a new study, researchers compared life in a country where LGBTQ folks encounter strong stigma with that in a country where stigma against them is low. The upshot: The risk of depression and suicide dropped significantly when gay men moved to a more toleran...

Adult 'Picky Eaters' on What Parents Did Right and Wrong

As many parents know, children can be notoriously picky eaters. In some cases, their chronically fearful approach towards food amounts to what is considered a serious psychiatric condition.

But a new survey of adults who were, and continue to be, finicky eaters suggests that rather than forcing a child to eat foods they don't like, parents will probably make more headway by embracing a no...

Sexism May Play Role in Who Performs Your Surgery

Male doctors are much more likely to refer patients to male surgeons, rather than send them to female surgeons with equal qualifications and experience, a new study finds.

"During my 20 years in practice, I always had the sense it was easier for my male surgical colleagues to get referrals than it was for me, and the patients they were referred were more likely to need surgery," said seni...

There May Be a 'Best Bedtime' for Your Heart

Is there an ideal time to go to bed every night if you want to dodge heart disease?

Apparently there is, claims a new study that found hitting the sack between 10 and 11 p.m. may be the ideal time to cut the risk for cardiovascular trouble.

The finding may be worth heeding, since the researchers also found that going to sleep before 10 p.m. or at midnight or later might raise the ri...

No Evidence Violent Video Games Lead to Real Violence: Study

Will boys fixated on gore-filled video games become violent in real life? Many parents may worry that's the case, but new and reassuring research finds violent video games don't trigger actual violence in kids.

The study included boys aged 8 to 18, the group most likely to play violent video games, and examined two types of violence: aggression against other people, and destruction of thi...

No 'Fall Back'? Sleep Experts Argue Against Daylight Standard Time

Most folks groan when the time comes to either "spring forward" or "fall back" an hour, with the waxing and waning of daylight saving time.

But that one-hour time shift — which occurs at 2 a.m. Sunday — is more than just a minor annoyance, sleep experts say.

Research has shown that deliberately messing with our internal clock twice a year increases our risk of accident, illness ...

How Bilingual Brains Shift Quickly Between Languages

Why is it so easy for bilingual folks to switch back and forth from one language to another?

Researchers have discovered that the brain uses a shared mechanism that makes using multiple languages completely natural.

"Languages may differ in what sounds they use and how they organize words to form sentences," said lead study author Sarah Phillips, a doctoral student in the Neurolingu...

U.S. Adolescents' Daily Screen Time Doubled During Pandemic

As teens dramatically stepped up their screen time during COVID-19 lockdowns, their well-being took a hit, a new study reveals.

Recreational screen time among U.S. teens doubled from before the pandemic to nearly eight hours per day during the pandemic, according to the report. And this estimate doesn't include time spent on screens for remote learning or schoolwork, so the total was like...

Liar, Liar:  Chronic Fibbers Are Rare, Study Reveals

Very few people are chronic liars, according to a study that may draw eyerolls from Americans swamped by "fake news" and misinformation.

Prior research has found that people tell an average of one or two lies a day. But these new findings suggest that doesn't reflect the behavior of most people, and that most fibs are told by only a few prolific liars, the study authors said.

"There...

More Fast-Food Outlets, More Diabetes in Your Neighborhood

Living near a fast-food restaurant may provide a quick fix if you're famished and pressed for time, but it may boost your odds for type 2 diabetes, a large study of U.S veterans suggests.

Neighborhoods with more supermarkets, however, may protect you against developing diabetes, especially in suburban and rural areas, the researchers said.

"The food availability choices in your envi...

Even a $25 Cash Card Can Motivate Some to Get Vaccinated

Can offering small cash cards, say for $25, be the difference between someone choosing to get their COVID-19 vaccine or waiting?

Yes, according to a study in North Carolina that offered $25 cash cards to people who got vaccines last spring at sites in four participating counties.

About 9% of those surveyed after getting their vaccines said that they would not have come to get vacci...

People With Autism at Higher Risk for Suicide, Self-Harm: Study

A significantly increased risk of self-harm and suicide among people with autism shows the need for programs to reduce that risk, researchers say.

For their study, the investigators analyzed 31 studies on the link between autism and self-harm/suicide that were posted to five databases between 1999 and 2021. Overall, children and adults with autism had a threefold increased risk of self-ha...

U.S. Gun Violence Rates Jumped 30% During Pandemic

Gun violence sky-rocketed by more than 30% across the United States during the first year of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Almost 39,000 injuries and deaths nationwide involved a gun in the year starting in February 2019 — and that number shot up to more than 51,000 between March 2020 and March 2021, according to nati...

Just 5 Hours of Moderate Exercise a Week Cuts Your Cancer Risk

Just a few hours a week of moderate exercise may reduce your risk of cancer, a new study suggests.

If Americans got the recommended five hours a week of moderate-intensity physical activity, more than 46,000 cancer cases could be prevented in the United States each year, according to the report.

The study authors said that 3% of all cancer cases in U.S. adults aged 30 and older fr...

Cigarette Sales Jumped During Pandemic

As COVID-19 has surged throughout the United States for the past year and a half, some may have picked up an old bad habit or started a new one.

How do researchers know this? They discovered that cigarette sales jumped during the first 15 months of the pandemic, exceeding their own estimates by 14%.

It's not entirely clear whether that's because current smokers are smoking more, fo...

Most Kids Newly Diagnosed With ADHD Aren't Getting Best Care

Preschoolers with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) rarely receive the gold-standard treatment recommended by the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) for their condition, a new study reports.

The AAP recommends a behavioral therapy technique called "parent training in behavior management," or PTBM, as first-line treatment for ADHD kids ages 4 and 5.

But only 1 of eve...

State Lotteries Didn't Help Boost Vaccination Rates

A shot at winning $1 million did nothing to budge the number of people who got the COVID-19 jab.

According to a new study, lotteries in 19 states designed to encourage people to get vaccinated ...

Nature Helped Many Kids Cope During Lockdown: Study

Children who spent more time in nature during pandemic lockdowns suffered fewer behavioral and emotional problems, British researchers say.

The investigators also found that children in wealthier families tended to increase their connection to nature during the pandemic more than those from poorer families.

The new study included 376 families in the United Kingdom who had children a...

'Feel Good' Hormone Won't Help Ease Kids' Autism, Study Finds

Despite hints of promise from early research, a new clinical trial finds no evidence that kids with autism benefit from nasal sprays containing the "love" hormone oxytocin.

Researchers called the findings disappointing.

But they said the study also offers important information: Some parents of children with autism are already using oxytocin nasal sprays in the hopes of supporting th...

Testosterone Levels Matter for Men's, Women's Sex Lives

What launches guys on serial sexual conquests and prompts solo activity among women?

It's testosterone, of course.

As the primary male sex hormone, it plays a leading role in the sexual development of guys. But folks often overlook the role it plays in female sexuality. Yes, women have testosterone, too, though much less of it — and it exerts a far different pull,

  • Alan Mozes HealthDay Reporter
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  • October 13, 2021
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  • Men, Women Behaved Differently During Pandemic Lockdowns

    How do men and women respond to a crisis?

    A look at their behavior during the first COVID-19 lockdown in 2020 offers a clue: Women flocked to their phones for long conversations with a few trusted contacts.

    Men, chafing at being cooped up, headed out and about as soon as they could, European researchers report.

    "The total shutdown of public life was like a population-wide liv...

    Stimulants Like Ritalin May Be Gateway Drugs for College Students

    Use of stimulants among college students was once thought to be a problem among high achievers seeking energy and focus to study.

    Not so, according to new research that links misuse of these so-called "study drugs" to binge drinking and marijuana use. The stereotype of students bumming a prescription medication like Adderall or Ritalin to study is off the mark, it suggests.

    "Stimula...

    Many Americans May Quit, Change Jobs Due to Pandemic Stress: Survey

    The pressures of the pandemic have dramatically altered the American workplace, and now a new survey shows that many folks who have struggled with low salaries, long hours and lack of opportunity plan to change jobs.

    More than 40% of workers said they plan to make the switch in the coming year, the poll found. If that occurs, it could seriously affect many industries already facing shorta...

    Medical Mistrust Fuels Vaccine Hesitancy Among Hispanics

    Misinformation and medical mistrust are major drivers of vaccine hesitancy among U.S. Hispanics, new research shows.

    The researchers also found that protecting other family members is an important factor in convincing Hispanics to get vaccinated.

    The small study included 22 Hispanic mothers in Oregon and 24 of their children who were in grades 9 to 12. At the time of the study, Hisp...

    Silver Lining Found in Pandemic: Fewer Teens Are Vaping

    It turns out that the pandemic has reaped one unexpected benefit: As teens were kept home more often, their use of electronic cigarettes dropped by nearly 40%, a new report finds.

    U.S. health officials said these numbers should be taken with a grain of salt, but the decrease in vaping in 2021 is probably real and makes sense because teens often vape socially, one expert told the Assoc...

    Diet Drinks May Thwart Efforts to Lose Weight

    Trying to slim down? Diet drinks aren't likely to help, researchers warn.

    And those containing the artificial sweetener sucralose may even increase food cravings and appetite in women and people who are obese, according to a University of Southern California study.

    "There...

    Babies Know Best When It Comes to Play

    Spend time with babies and you'll see they pick up items, bang them together and, often, chew on them.

    That play is key to learning and development, but most research on infant play has taken place in a lab and not on a living room floor — until now.

    "At a time in development when infants must acquire information about what objects are and what they can do with them, massive amoun...

    Retired and Want to Stay Sharp? Hop on the Internet More Often

    Help in retaining mental function when you age could be only a few keystrokes away.

    While crosswords and exercise are often touted as ways to retain thinking skills, U.K. investigators found that the internet may also help seniors stay sharp in retirement.

    Those who used the internet more after their careers ended had substantially higher scores on cognitive, or thinking, tests, ac...

    For Boys, Sports Key to Mental Health

    Trying to fit soccer or Little League into your son's busy schedule? Canadian researchers offer some compelling reasons to do so.

    Little boys who play sports are less apt to be anxious or depressed later in childhood and more likely to be active in their early teens, according to the University of Montreal study.

    "We wanted to clarify the long-term and reciprocal relationship in sch...

    Obesity a Threat to Adults With Autism, But There May Be Help

    Eating well and exercising regularly can be a challenge for anyone. But for those with autism spectrum disorder or intellectual disabilities, that challenge is exponentially greater.

    Many young men and women with autism and intellectual disabilities face a significantly higher risk for obesity, and all the health complications that follow.

    Yet, a small, new pilot study suggest...

    Intervening in Infancy Might Help Prevent Some Cases of Autism: Study

    Infants may show early signs of autism, but a diagnosis usually isn't made until age 3. Now, a new study suggests that jumpstarting therapy might stave off that diagnosis altogether.

    Researchers say their preemptive, parent-led intervention could have a significant impact on children's social development and longer-term disabilities.

    "What we found is that the babies who received ou...

    Dealing With Grief in the Time of COVID

    That feeling that many people are collectively experiencing right now? It's grief.

    Some may be living through the loss of family, friends or colleagues who have died from the COVID-19 virus. Others have had losses that would be considered major life events, such as a job layoff. Many have lost recreation, social support and relationships.

    Grief can be part of all of these types of ...

    Do Your Genes Up Your Odds for Alcoholism? One Factor Cuts the Risk

    Even when genetics and personality are working against you, having a strong network of supportive friends and family may help lower alcoholism risk, researchers say.

    "Genes play an important role in alcohol use," stressed Jinni Su, an assistant professor of psychology at Arizona State University in Tempe, and lead author of a new study.

    But "genes are not our destiny," she added.

    In 16 States, 35% or More Residents Now Obese: CDC

    America's waistline keeps widening.

    On Wednesday, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced that 16 states now have at least 35% of their residents who are obese, a number that's nearly doubled since 2018.

    The CDC's 2020 Adult Obesity Prevalence Maps now show that Delaware, Iowa, Ohio and Texas have joined Alabama, Arkansas, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana,...

    Medical Paperwork: So Bad Some Folks Skip Care

    Getting prior authorizations to see a specialist, dealing with errors on medical bills and even scheduling appointments can be a big hassle.

    That's clear to anyone who has spent time on the phone handling issues with insurance companies or doctors' offices.

    For some patients, in fact, it's a hurdle that's caused them to delay or even forgo needed medical care.

    "It is the thi...

    Is There a Link Between Vaping and Eating Disorders in the Young?

    College students who vape appear to be at higher risk of having an eating disorder, a new study suggests.

    "The study's findings are especially relevant as we have seen a surge in referrals for eating disorders and substance use disorders during the pandemic," said study author Dr. Jason Nagata. He is an assistant professor in the department of pediatrics at the University of California, S...

    In Your Sights: How Eye Contact Enhances a Conversation

    Seeing eye to eye -- literally -- makes conversations more appealing, a new study finds.

    "Eye contact is really immersive and powerful," said researcher Sophie Wohltjen, a graduate student in psychological and brain sciences at Dartmouth College.

    "When two people are having a conversation, eye contact signals that shared attention is high -- that they are in peak synchrony with one ...

    Anxious? Maybe You Can Exercise It Away

    Anxiety prevention may be just a snowy trail away.

    New research suggests cross-country skiers -- and perhaps others who also exercise vigorously -- are less prone to develop anxiety disorders than less active folks.

    Researchers in Sweden spent roughly two decades tracking anxiety risk among more than 395,000 Swedes. Nearly half the participants were skiers with a history of competin...

    Could You Help Prevent a Suicide? Know the Warning Signs

    Knowing the warning signs of suicide can save a life, experts say.

    Suicide is the 10th leading overall cause of death in the United States, and number two among people between the ages of 10 and 34.

    Most suicides result from depression. It can cause someone to feel worthless, hopeless and a burden on others, making suicide falsely appear to be a solution, according to the

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  • September 12, 2021
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  • Would More Free Time Really Make You Happier?

    Many people feel their to-do list is overloaded, but there is also such a thing as too much free time, a new study suggests.

    In a series of studies, researchers found that having either too little or too much free time seemed to drain people's sense of well-being.

    It's no surprise that constantly feeling pressed for time -- and the stress that creates -- can take a toll on well-bein...

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