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Health News Results - 608

Nearly 7% of U.S. Kids Have Had a Head Injury or Concussion

Blows to the head are common among America's kids, with close to 7% showing signs of a brain injury at some time in childhood, U.S. health officials report.

Sports, falls and abuse are likely causes, experts say.

Concussions and other head injuries are more common among white kids than Black or Hispanic kids. And prevalence increases with age — from 2% in children up to 5 years ...

Kids With Uncontrolled Asthma at Higher Odds for Severe COVID-19

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 1, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Asthma is a tough disease for kids and their parents to manage well, but not keeping it under control may make these children up to six times more likely to wind up in the hospital with severe COVID-19, new research shows.

With the cold and flu season about to kick in and COVID-19 rates climbing again in some areas, kids with ...

HPV Vaccine Is Reducing Cervical Cancers in Teens, Young Women

The first wave of girls to receive the HPV vaccine are much less likely to contract or die from cervical cancer than women just a few years older, a new study reports.

Nearly all cases of cervical cancer are caused by human papillomavirus (HPV), for which a vaccine has been available since 2006.

Cervical cancer deaths and cases have fallen dramatically among 14- to 24-year-old women...

Pfizer to Seek FDA Approval of Boosters for Teens Ages 16-17

Pfizer Inc. is expected to seek approval this week for emergency use of its booster shots among American teens ages 16-17.

Sources familiar with the matter told The New York Times that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration could give the green light in about a week, which would make the Pfizer booster shot the first one available for people younger than 18.

When asked about...

COVID May Trigger Heart Condition in Young Athletes

MONDAY, Nov. 29, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- A heart condition, myocarditis, has been found in a number of U.S. college athletes who have had COVID-19, a new study finds.

Myocarditis has also been linked in some young people to the COVID vaccine. But the odds are far greater that this inflammation of the heart muscle will occur in those who get COVID infection itself...

Many Kids, Teens Think Girls Don't Care About Computer Science

The misconception that girls are less interested than boys in computer science and engineering begins at a young age in the United States.

And it's one reason for the gender gap in those career fields, according to a new study.

In surveys of more than 2,200 U.S. children and teens in grades 1 through 12, researchers found that half 51% believed girls are ...

Could a Single Dose of the HPV Vaccine Be Enough?

Women getting vaccinated against the cancer-causing human papillomavirus (HPV) now need two or three shots, but an African clinical trial suggests a single dose is just as effective.

The finding could speed up the immunization process in developing countries with high levels of HPV-related cancers and protect many more women more quickly.

"These findings are a gamechanger that may s...

Singer Selena Gomez to Launch Mental Health Platform

A new mental health media platform meant to connect people with educational resources and reduce the stigma around mental illness is planned by pop star Selena Gomez and her partners.

Wondermind is set to launch in February 2022 and will include mental health experts sharing their expertise, and daily exercises that people can do to strengthen their mental health, CNN reported.

Vaping Could Weaken Your Bones, Study Finds

MONDAY, Nov. 22, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- The evidence against vaping is mounting, and a new study now links e-cigarettes with an increased risk for broken bones.

Over time, vaping appears to increase the risk for fracture of the hip, spine and wrist by 46%, according to the findings. Researchers said these fractures happen from falls while standing and even from lower...

Most Parents Say Their Kids Aren't Thankful Enough: Poll

As American families sit down to celebrate Thanksgiving, a majority of parents say they want to raise grateful kids but they don't think they're succeeding.

Four out of five respondents to a new nationwide poll said children aren't as thankful as they should be, and half worry that they overindulge their own kids. Two in five also said they're sometimes embarrassed by how selfish their ch...

Pandemic Curbed Kids' Efforts to Lose Excess Weight

FRIDAY, Nov. 19, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- A new study is highlighting yet another consequence of the COVID-19 pandemic: It has likely made it even harder for kids with obesity to manage their weight.

The findings, researchers said, are no surprise. Many adults, faced with normal life bei...

Almost 1 in Every 3 College-Age Americans Are Now Obese

TUESDAY, Nov. 23, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- It's probably fair to say that most people know of the so-called "Freshman 15" — the weight that college students are often said to gain when they're away from home for the first time.

But in recent decades, matters have gotten much worse in the United States. A new study using national data for people aged 18 to 25 found tha...

Teen Social Media Posts About Cutting, Other Self-Harm Are Soaring

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 17, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- American teens are increasingly turning to the social media giant Instagram to share graphic images of their own attempts to harm themselves, a new study reveals.

"It could be an attempt to share their emotional or psychological pain with others or find support from others," said study lead author Amanda Giordano. She is an a...

HPV Vaccination Rises in States That Don't Require Parental Consent

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 17, 2021 (HealthDay News) – When young people are allowed to give their own consent for human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines, vaccination rates are higher, new research shows.

The new study suggests that allowing teens to consent without parental involvement could be an important strategy for boosting HPV vaccination rates. This consent is already a policy in several U.S....

Cases of Children's Severe COVID-Linked Illness Were Worse in Second Wave

A rare inflammatory condition associated with COVID-19 in children was more severe in the second wave of patients than in the first, researchers report.

For the study, investigators examined the cases of 106 patients with multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C) who arrived in two waves at Children's National Hospital in Washington, D.C.

In the first wave, patients were...

Trauma in Childhood Can Harm Health for a Lifetime: Study

As if suffering through a childhood trauma weren't enough, new research suggests it might raise the risk of poor mental and physical health later in life.

Researchers analyzed nearly 2,900 responses to the 2019 New Zealand Family Violence Survey and found that about 45% of respondents said they had no adverse childhood events, a majority experienced at least one, and one-third reported mo...

Exercise, Not Bed Rest, Can Speed Concussion Recovery

Contrary to long-held wisdom, teen athletes recover from concussions sooner if they do light aerobic exercise rather than resting in a dark room, new research suggests.

Instead of so-called "cocoon therapy," new research-supported therapy has young concussion patients getting out of bed and doing protected exercise earlier.

"What the research found was that adolescents were having ...

Adult 'Picky Eaters' on What Parents Did Right and Wrong

As many parents know, children can be notoriously picky eaters. In some cases, their chronically fearful approach towards food amounts to what is considered a serious psychiatric condition.

But a new survey of adults who were, and continue to be, finicky eaters suggests that rather than forcing a child to eat foods they don't like, parents will probably make more headway by embracing a no...

Hip Replacements on the Rise Among the Very Young

It may look like bad news, but a new study says it's not: The number of people younger than 21 who had total hip replacement surgery in the United States jumped from 347 in 2000 to 551 in 2016.

The increase wasn't due to a rise in the number of children with inflammatory arthritis, which often prompts a hip replacement in the very young. That suggests that non-surgical treatments to contr...

U.S. Adolescents Are Getting Less Sex Education Now Than 25 Years Ago

Sex Ed -- it's been a staple of public education for decades, but new research shows that only half of American teens are getting instruction that meets minimum standards.

"The findings show that most adolescents are not receiving sex education that will enable them to manage their sexual lives," said study author Leslie Kantor, chair of the Department of Urban-Global Public Health at Rut...

Screening School Kids for Depression Boosts Diagnoses, Outcomes

Schools could provide solutions for kids who are grappling with depression, a new study suggests.

Students who have school-based depression screening are twice as likely to begin treatment as peers who don't get that service, researchers say.

"Our study is publishing at a time when more adolescents are reporting symptoms of depression," said principal investigator Dr. Deepa Sekhar, ...

Discrimination Takes Toll on Mental Health of Young Adults

Young adults who face discrimination about their bodies, race, age or sex are at increased risk for mental health issues, researchers report.

They analyzed data gathered from more than 1,800 U.S. participants who provided details about their mental health, behavior and experiences of discrimination between ages 18 and 28, CNN reported.

Those who encountered discrimination a...

No Evidence Violent Video Games Lead to Real Violence: Study

Will boys fixated on gore-filled video games become violent in real life? Many parents may worry that's the case, but new and reassuring research finds violent video games don't trigger actual violence in kids.

The study included boys aged 8 to 18, the group most likely to play violent video games, and examined two types of violence: aggression against other people, and destruction of thi...

Many Kids With Asthma Are Unprepared for Adult Asthma Care

Many young Americans with asthma aren't sufficiently prepared by their childhood care providers to transition to adult care, a small new study shows.

It's important for youth with asthma to understand their asthma-related medical needs will likely change as they age, and they may need to switch providers, experts say.

"Teens who are about to go off to college are at an ideal stage t...

HPV Vaccination When Young Cuts Cervical Cancer Risk by 87%

The sooner girls are vaccinated against human papillomavirus (HPV), the lower their future risk of cervical cancer, a new study finds.

Compared to unvaccinated women, the risk of cervical cancer was 87% lower among those who received the bivalent vaccine Cervarix at ages 12 or 13. By contrast, it was 62% lower in those who got the vaccine at ages 14-16 and 34% lower those vaccinated at ag...

U.S. Adolescents' Daily Screen Time Doubled During Pandemic

As teens dramatically stepped up their screen time during COVID-19 lockdowns, their well-being took a hit, a new study reveals.

Recreational screen time among U.S. teens doubled from before the pandemic to nearly eight hours per day during the pandemic, according to the report. And this estimate doesn't include time spent on screens for remote learning or schoolwork, so the total was like...

High School Football Won't Raise Lifetime Risk for Suicide: Study

Some parents may worry about whether playing high school football might put their kids at risk for depression and suicidal thoughts in adulthood, but new research suggests they can relax.

It included more than 2,300 U.S. males who enrolled in the study at average age of 15 and were assessed again at an average age of 29. At the start of the study, about 28% of the participants said they p...

Number of Teens Who Vape Marijuana Doubled in 7 Years

Teenagers have followed the vaping trend into marijuana use, with recent studies chronicling a boom in pot vaping among adolescents in the United States and Canada, researchers report.

The percentage of teens who've experimented with vaped pot has more than doubled in recent years, and vaping among frequent marijuana users has quadrupled, according to the study.

Currently about 1 in...

Moderna Says Its COVID Vaccine Works Well in Children Aged 6 to 11

Moderna announced Monday that its COVID-19 vaccine safely triggers a strong immune response in children aged 6 to 11.

Company data shows that a month after receiving both doses of the vaccine, children's antibody levels were 1.5 ...

Even With Mild COVID, Obesity May Mean Worse Symptoms

Obese people have a tougher time fighting COVID-19, even if they have a milder form of the virus, a new study finds.

Researchers looked at more than 500 patients who tested positive for COVID but didn't require hospitalization. Teens and adults who were overweight or obese had more symptoms, including cough and shortness of breath, than those of normal weight.

"Even when infected wi...

Many Parents Worry That Kids Fell Behind in Schooling During Pandemic

It is a fear that millions of parents have been harboring since the pandemic began: Will their children fall behind in school due to disruptions caused by lockdowns, closings and social distancing?

A new U.S. poll finds that fear is widespread, with just over half of more than 3,000 parents and caregivers of children under 18 worried that their youngest school-aged child was not keeping u...

U.S. Pediatricians, Psychiatrists Declare 'Emergency' in Child Mental Health

Fear, grief, uncertainty and isolation during the pandemic have triggered a national state of emergency in the mental health of America's youth, leading child health care groups warned Tuesday.

Youngsters already faced significant mental health challenges, and the pandemic has made them worse, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), the American Academy of Child and Adolesc...

Be Your Teen's Best Partner as They Learn to Drive

Parents of teen drivers can play a crucial role in making their children safe drivers, the Governors Highway Safety Association says.

Millions of U.S. teens are learning to drive at an especially challenging time as risky and dangerous driving has increased during the COVID-19 pandemic, the association noted.

"Teen drivers are more likely than any other age group to be involved in a...

Two-Thirds of Parents of Kids Ages 5-11 Plan to Get Them Vaccinated Against COVID: Poll

In some heartening news on the vaccine front, two-thirds of American parents of children ages 5 to 11 plan to get their youngsters vaccinated when COVID-19 shots are approved for that age group, a new survey shows.

"While we're encouraged to see that a majority of parents intend to vaccinate their children against COVID-19 once they are eligible, there is clearly more work to be done to h...

Kids Can Carry High, Infectious Levels of COVID Coronavirus

From newborns to new adults, young people who get COVID-19 can carry high levels of the virus and spread it to others even if they show no symptoms.

That's the takeaway from a study of 110 people between 2 weeks and 21 years of age who tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 infection.

Researchers found that infants, children and teens were equally capable of carrying high levels of live, re...

Kids With Autism Find It Tough to Read Hidden Emotions: Study

When you're putting on a brave face to mask disappointment or shedding tears of joy, kids with autism are likely to misunderstand how you're really feeling.

That's because they don't use context to identify underlying emotions, according to a new study investigating whether kids with autism are able to tell when one emotion is concealing a different one.

The comparative analysis loo...

California Expands Access to Free Menstrual Products in Schools

Free menstrual pads and tampons must be provided in restrooms at all California public schools and colleges starting in the 2022-2023 academic year.

The bill, signed on Oct. 8 by Gov. Gavin Newsom, adds to a 2017 law requiring low-income schools in disadvantaged areas to provide students with free menstrual products, the Associated Press reported.

The new law expands that t...

Stimulants Like Ritalin May Be Gateway Drugs for College Students

Use of stimulants among college students was once thought to be a problem among high achievers seeking energy and focus to study.

Not so, according to new research that links misuse of these so-called "study drugs" to binge drinking and marijuana use. The stereotype of students bumming a prescription medication like Adderall or Ritalin to study is off the mark, it suggests.

"Stimula...

Social Distancing Kept Kids From Getting Flu, RSV

Social distancing and mask mandates during the pandemic nearly eliminated cases of the flu and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) among children, a new study finds.

"Numbers don't lie. Face masking, and proper hygiene and isolation, can be effective means to protect the vulnerable groups, such as the elderly and young children, during the respiratory virus season," said study author Dr. Os...

Picky Eating, Social Phobia Often Linked in College Students

Parents frazzled by their little ones' finicky food choices often sigh in exasperation, thinking: "They'll grow out of it by college."

Maybe not, suggests a new study from Bowling Green State University in Ohio. Some young people continue their picky eating into early adulthood, often restricting their diets to 10 foods or even fewer.

Such a limited diet can mean they're not getting...

Kids With Food Allergies Are Often Targets for Bullies

Life is challenging enough for teens and pre-teens with food allergies. But bullying often comes with the territory, making their situation worse.

In a new study of more than 100 kids with food allergies, nearly one-third said they had been subject to some form of food allergy-related bullying.

"We also found that only 12% of parents reported that their child was bullied for ...

As Kids Turned to Screens During Pandemic, Their Mental Health Suffered

Even in normal times, getting regular exercise and spending less time on screens can be good for kids. So it should come as no surprise that researchers discovered that kids who exercised more and used technology less during the pandemic had better mental health outcomes.

"Both as a pediatrician and as a mother, it was obvious that the circumstances of the pandemic -- school closures, res...

Medical Mistrust Fuels Vaccine Hesitancy Among Hispanics

Misinformation and medical mistrust are major drivers of vaccine hesitancy among U.S. Hispanics, new research shows.

The researchers also found that protecting other family members is an important factor in convincing Hispanics to get vaccinated.

The small study included 22 Hispanic mothers in Oregon and 24 of their children who were in grades 9 to 12. At the time of the study, Hisp...

1 in 4 Parents Say Their Kids Have Been Quarantined Since School Started

One-quarter of U.S. parents report that their child has had to quarantine because of possible COVID-19 exposure since school started, a new poll finds.

The nationally representative survey of 1,519 people conducted between Sept. 13 and Sept. 22 included 414 people who identified themselves as parents of children aged 17 and younger. Still, about two-thirds of parents said they thought sch...

Silver Lining Found in Pandemic: Fewer Teens Are Vaping

It turns out that the pandemic has reaped one unexpected benefit: As teens were kept home more often, their use of electronic cigarettes dropped by nearly 40%, a new report finds.

U.S. health officials said these numbers should be taken with a grain of salt, but the decrease in vaping in 2021 is probably real and makes sense because teens often vape socially, one expert told the Assoc...

Sibling Bullying Carries Long-Term Mental Health Costs

Bullying by a brother or sister in childhood can have lasting effects, threatening mental health in the teen years, new British research suggests.

Researchers found that mental health was affected whether one was the bully or the victim.

"Of particular note was the finding that even those who bullied their siblings, but weren't bullied themselves [i.e. the bullies] had poorer mental...

Active Learning Best for Students: Study

Whether you're a kid or a college student, you'll learn more with interactive activities, discussions, movement and even AI-enhanced technologies than you will just sitting still and listening, a new study suggests.

Learning methods that work best are hands-on, as well as what the researchers called "minds-on" and "hearts-on," using emotional and social support, the findings showed.

...

LGBQ Teens More Likely to Contemplate Suicide

Kids who are gay, bisexual or questioning their sexuality may be vulnerable to contemplating suicide at a tender age, a new U.S. government study finds.

It has long been known that teenagers who are part of sexual minorities have a higher risk of suicidal thoughts and behaviors, compared to their heterosexual peers. That includes kids who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender or...

Teens Who Use Pot, E-Cigs and Cigarettes Are in Triple Danger

More U.S. teens use e-cigarettes, traditional cigarettes and marijuana together, posing greater risks to their health and behavior than if they used only one substance, a new study finds.

Called "triple users," this group score high on a profile of psychosocial risk, which includes fighting, risky sexual behavior and behaviors such as not wearing seat belts, according to lead researcher T...

Fruits, Veggies a Recipe for Mental Well-Being in Kids

Teens who eat lots of fruits and vegetables are likely to enjoy better mental health.

That's the key takeaway from a new study that also tied a nutritious breakfast and lunch to emotional well-being in kids of all ages.

"This study provides the first insights into how fruit and vegetable intake affects children's mental health and contributes to the emerging evidence around 'food an...

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