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Not Enough Older Americans Are Checking Blood Pressure At Home

Regular home monitoring can help with blood pressure control, but only half of people who have hypertension or other related conditions actually do it, a new study found.

Of Americans ages 50 to 80 who take blood pressure me...

Spikes in Blood Pressure Bring Many Americans to the ER

When it comes to why U.S. heart patients wind up in the emergency room, uncontrolled high blood pressure (or "hypertension") fuels about one-third of those medical crises.

“These visits resulted in hospital admission less than 3% of the time and with very few deaths — less than 0.1%. This suggests...

Most Pregnancy-Related Deaths in U.S. Could Have Been Prevented

More than four out of five pregnancy-related deaths in the United States could have been prevented, according to a new federal government report.

The researchers examined data from

Deadly Form of High Cholesterol Can Catch Black Americans by Surprise

Chad Gradney underwent quadruple bypass open-heart surgery at age 27, and afterward spent eight fruitless years battling extremely high cholesterol levels.

Then in 2012 he found himself back in an emergency room, again suffering from chest pain.

"That's when I found out three of the four bypasses basically had failed again," recalls Gradney, now 44 and living in Baton Rouge, La.

...

Lupus, MS and Other Autoimmune Disorders Raise Heart Risks

Research has linked heart disease to specific autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and lupus. Now, a huge study shows that autoimmune diseases as a group increase your chances of developing heart ills.

Autoimmune diseases such as psoriasis, multiple sclerosis, lupus erythematosus and type 1 diabetes occur when the body engages in friendly fire against its own organs, tissues, ...

Hypertension in Pregnancy Is Getting More Common for Gen Z Women

Gen Zers and millennials are about twice as likely to develop high blood pressure during pregnancy than women from the baby boom generation were, a new study finds. This includes conditions such as preeclampsia and gestational hypertension.

It's usually believed that the odds of developing high blood pressure during pregnancy rise with the age of the mother, but after taking age into acco...

Medical Marijuana for Pain Is Linked to Slight Rise in Heart Trouble

People who use medical marijuana to treat chronic pain may have a slightly heightened risk of heart arrhythmias, a preliminary study suggests.

Researchers found that among 1.6 million people with chronic pain, those prescribed medical marijuana were 64% more likely to suffer a heart rhythm disturbanc...

Are High-Tech Blood Pressure Monitors Really Worth It?

When it comes to taking your blood pressure at home, smart devices with lots of bells and whistles are no better than old-school monitors, which happen to cost much less.

This is the main finding of a new study that compared high-tech devices that link to your smartph...

A Switch to Salt Substitute Could Slash Your Heart Risks

Swapping salt out for the salt substitute potassium chloride lowers blood pressure, and thereby the risk of heart attack, stroke and cardiovascular disease, a new analysis finds.

"It's in processed and prepared foods where most people in developed countries get their salt," explained senior researc...

Early Menopause Could Mean More Heart Trouble Later

Women who go into menopause when they are younger than 40 are at greater risk of heart problems, reports a new Korean study of more than 1.4 million females.

Women with premature menopause had an overall 33% higher risk of

  • By Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • August 8, 2022
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  • Loneliness Can Be a Real Heartbreaker, Cardiac Experts Warn

    Social isolation and loneliness put people at a 30% higher risk of heart attack, stroke or death from either, a new scientific statement from the American Heart Association (AHA) warns.

    The statement also highlights the lack of data on interventions that could improve heart health in isolated or lonely people. It was published Aug. 4 in the

  • By Sydney Murphy HealthDay Reporter
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  • August 5, 2022
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  • More Than Half of Young U.S. Adults Have a Chronic Health Condition

    Obesity, depression, high blood pressure, asthma: These are just a few of the chronic health conditions that are now affecting almost 40 million Americans between the ages 18 and 34, new federal data shows.

    Overall, the 2019 data found that more than half of young adults (nearly 54%) now deal with at least on...

    More Young Americans Are Dying of Heart Failure

    A growing number of younger American adults are dying of heart failure, with Black Americans being the hardest-hit, a new study finds.

    Heart failure is a chronic condition in which the heart muscle cannot pump blood as well as it should, leading to symptoms like fat...

    Texas Court Case Could Threaten Americans' Health Care Nationwide

    A federal lawsuit out of Texas could end access to free lifesaving preventive health care services for nearly 168 million people in the United States with private insurance, a new report suggests.

    Kelley v. Becerra seeks to overturn the

  • By Robin Foster and Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporters
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  • July 27, 2022
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  • High Blood Pressure Doubles Odds That COVID Will Be Severe

    Nearly half of American adults have high blood pressure — and that alone more than doubles their odds of being hospitalized if they are infected with the Omicron variant of the coronavirus, a new study revealed.

    This was true even in people who were fully vaccinated and boosted against COVID-19, according to researchers at the Smidt Heart Institute at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los ...

    Go Bananas for Female Heart Health

    It may sound bananas, but new research shows eating this potassium-rich food can improve heart health.

    Avocados and salmon also are high in potassium, helping counteract the negative effects of salt in the diet and

  • By Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • July 22, 2022
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  • Fewer Americans Are Dying of Heart Disease Than a Decade Ago

    Deaths from heart-related causes have dropped over the past 20 years, though differences persist by race and ethnicity as well as where people live and their access to care.

    The U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH), which partially funded the research, detailed the results of three papers. The findings were published July 18 in the American Heart Association journal Circulation

    Neighborhood Drop in Violent Crime May Also Boost Heart Health

    Every town wants low crime rates. But a new finding may offer a whole new reason to advocate for the change: Falling crime rates may lower heart disease fatalities.

    An analysis of 2000-2014 data from Chicago illustrated a significant decline in violent crime. Across the city, the drop in total crime was 16%, while simultaneously there was a 13% decrease in

  • By Ellie Quinlan Houghtaling HealthDay Reporter
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  • July 18, 2022
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  • Biggest Weight Gain Now Comes Early in Adulthood

    The obesity epidemic isn't slowing down anytime soon, and new research delivers even worse news: Most American adults have not only gained more weight, but they gained most of it earlier in life.

    The statistics were grim: More than half of Americans in the representative sample had gained 5% or more body weight during a 10-year period. More than one-third of Americans had gained 10% or mo...

    Only 7% of American Adults in Good Cardiometabolic Health

    Less than 7% of U.S. adults are in good cardiometabolic shape, and new research warns the trend is only getting worse.

    Cardiometabolic health is an umbrella term that includes blood pressure, blood sugar, blood cholesterol, weight and/or the presence of heart disease.

    "While w...

    Most U.S. Kids Score Low on Heart Health

    Most U.S. children and adults have poor scores for heart health, according to a new assessment tool called "Life's Essential 8."

    Fewer than 30% of 2- to 19-year-olds had high scores for cardiovascular health on the new American Heart Association scoring tool. And their scores got lower with age. Just 14% of 12- to 19-year-olds had high scores, compared to 33% of 6- to 11-year-olds and 56%...

    Pollutants in Soil Can Harm Your Heart

    While it's more widely known that polluted air can harm human health, another danger may be lurking at your feet.

    New research shows that soil, too, can contain contaminants that can impact health. These include pesticides and heavy metals.

    In this study, sci...

    Light in Your Bedroom Is No Good for Your Health

    Keeping your bedroom dark not only helps you get a good night's sleep, but may significantly lower your odds of developing three major health problems, a new study suggests.

    Older men and women who used night lights, or left their TV, smartphone or tablet on in the room were more likely to be obese, and have high blood pressure and diabetes, compared with adults who were not exposed to an...

    Boomers Sicker Than Their Parents Were at Same Age

    There's some discouraging news for baby boomers.

    Americans born between 1948 and 1965 are more likely than the generations that preceded them to have multiple health problems as they age, a new study shows.

    And, many develop ...

    'Forever Chemicals' May Raise a Woman's Blood Pressure

    Called "forever chemicals" because they linger in the environment, new research suggests that middle-aged women with high levels of perfluoroalkyls and polyfluoroalkyls (PFAS) in their blood may be more vulnerable to high blood pressure.

    In the study, women aged 45 to 56 who had the highest concentrat...

    No Sign 1 Year of Testosterone Supplements Cause Heart Trouble: Study

    One year of testosterone therapy for men with low levels of the hormone does not appear to increase their risk for heart problems, British researchers found.

    "We were unable to find evidence ... that testosterone increases risks of mortality or cardiovascular and/or cerebrovascular [heart and/or stroke] events in the short- to medium-term in men with low testosterone," said study leader D...

    Surviving Childhood Cancer Can Take Toll on Adult Heart

    Adult survivors of childhood cancer have a higher risk of heart problems than other adults, but are much less likely to be treated for heart disease risk factors such as high blood pressure, diabetes and high cholesterol, new research shows.

    The findings highlight the need for greater awareness among both doctors and patients of the increased risk of heart disease among the estimated 500,...

    Risk Factors for Dementia May Change With Age

    Dementia risk factors appear to shift with age, and experts say knowing that could help people make lifestyle changes to reduce their chances of developing the disease.

    "Dementia is a complicated disease and risk prediction scores need to b...

    Asthma, Allergies Raise Heart Risks, Too

    If you have asthma or allergies, you may be more likely to develop heart disease, and some medications may increase or lower that risk, a new review of clinical trials and lab research shows.

    "Many people think of asthma as a disease of the lungs, but there's an important link between asthma and cardiovascular diseases, such as coronary heart diseases, [high blood pressure] and more," sai...

    Unvaccinated and Having Heart Trouble? That Can Be Deadly When COVID Strikes

    Your chances of dying or having severe complications from COVID-19 are much higher if you're unvaccinated and have heart problems or heart disease risk factors, researchers warn.

    In a new study, British investigators analyzed 110 previous COVID-19 studies that included a total of nearly 49,000 unvaccinated patients.

    The researchers found that unvaccinated people with evidence of he...

    Obesity May Be Affecting Heart Health in Kids as Young as 6

    As early as age 6, children who carry extra weight could be headed down a path toward future diabetes or heart disease, a new study suggests.

    The study, of nearly 1,000 Danish children, found that kids who were overweight often had elevations in blood sugar and insulin by the time ...

    High Blood Pressure Now Affects 1 in Every 7 U.S. Pregnancies

    Rates of high blood pressure among pregnant women in the United States are on the rise and now occur in at least one in seven hospital deliveries, a new government report warns.

    The overall rate of what are called hypertensive disorder...

    Heart Risk Factors Can Be Recipe for Dementia

    The faster you pile up heart disease risk factors, the greater your odds of developing dementia, a new study suggests.

    Previous research has linked heart health threats such as high blood pressure, diabetes and obesity with mental decline and dementia.

    Amassing those risk factors at a faster pace boosts your risk for

  • By Robert Preidt HealthDay Reporter
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  • April 25, 2022
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  • Online Program Helps Stroke Survivors Recover

    A healthier lifestyle is recommended for stroke survivors, but that's often easier said than done. Now, online programs are coming to the rescue, according to a new study.

    "Online platforms are a viable and impactful model to address the health information needs and behavior change challenges of stroke survivors," said study author Ashleigh Guillaumier of the University of Newcastle in Au...

    Does Cutting Back on Salt Help Folks Battling Heart Failure?

    If you have heart failure, there's good news and bad news on how much it would help you to cut back on salt.

    New research finds that while it doesn't prevent death or hospitalization among patients, it does appear to improve their quality of life.

    Patients wit...

    Will a Little Drinking Help Your Heart? Maybe Not

    If you believe an occasional tipple is good for your heart, a new study may make you reconsider the notion.

    Some previous research has suggested that light drinking may benefit the heart, but this large study concluded that any amount of drinki...

    Smartwatch Heart Data May Be Less Accurate for Black Users

    Millions of Americans use smartwatches or fitness trackers to check on their heart rate, but the accuracy may fall short for people of color, a new research review finds.

    The analysis, of 10 published studies, found that in four of them, wearable devices were clea...

    Blood Sugar, Cholesterol Issues in 30s Could Raise Alzheimer's Risk

    Your 30s can be a magical time filled with career strides, vacations you can actually afford, love, marriage and even a growing family of your own.

    It's likely not the decade where you begin to fret about your risk for developing Alzheimer's disease in the future. But maybe it should be.

    This is the main takeaway from new research based on data from the multi-generational

  • Denise Mann
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  • March 23, 2022
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  • Firefighters Face Higher Odds for Heart Trouble

    The more blazes firefighters battle, the higher their risk for a heart rhythm disorder called atrial fibrillation (a-fib), a new study shows.

    "Clinicians who care for firefighters need to be aware of the increased cardiovascular risk, especially the increased ris...

    People Are Now Living More Years in Good Health: Study

    Older adults may not only be living longer, but better as well, according to a new U.K. study.

    Researchers found that since the 1990s, British adults age 65 and up have been enjoying more years living independently, free of disability.

    That's despite the fact that many chroni...

    Triglycerides a Stroke Danger, Even With Statin Treatment

    Stroke survivors may be watching their "bad" cholesterol, but a new study suggests another type of blood fat could put them at risk of a repeat stroke within the next year.

    Researchers found that stroke survivors with high triglycerides suffered repeat strokes at about twice the rate of survivor...

    Rise in Blood Pressure Upon Standing Could Signal Danger

    If your blood pressure spikes when you stand, you may be at increased risk for heart attack and stroke, Italian researchers warn.

    "The results of the study confirmed our initial hypothesis - a pronounced increase in blood pressure from lying to standing could be prognostically important in young people with high blood pressure," said lead study author Dr. Paolo Palatini. He is a professor...

    Are Health Care Apps in Your Future?

    Are you managing a chronic health problem, be it obesity or diabetes or heart disease or asthma?

    There's likely an app for that.

    Health apps are becoming more and more sophisticated, offering smartphone users help in dealing with chronic ailments, said Dr. David Bates, chief of internal med...

    When You Get a Blood Pressure Reading, Cuff Size Matters

    Can the size of a blood pressure cuff throw off your reading?

    Yes, claims a new study that found an ill-fitting blood pressure cuff could make the difference between being accurately diagnosed with ...

    Leg Cramps, Pain? It Could Be PAD

    Pain or cramping in your legs during physical activity may be an early sign of a condition called peripheral artery disease (PAD) -- and you should get checked out by your doctor, an expert says.

    PAD occurs when plaque develops in the arteries...

    Too Many Americans Are Getting 'Low-Value' Medical Tests, Procedures

    When your cardiologist orders a test, do you stop to ask why you need it? You probably don't - but perhaps you should, according to a new report from the American Heart Association (AHA).

    Too many Americans receive heart tests and treatments that do little good, and more needs to be done about it, the AHA says.

    The issue of "low-value" medical care is a longstanding one - with about...

    Even Washing Dishes Helps an Older Woman's Heart

    You don't need to run marathons or sweat it out on your indoor bike to boost your heart health.

    This is the main message of a new study that found everyday household activities including dishwashing, gardening and cooking also count when it comes to helping older women reduce their risk for heart disease...

    Sexual Harassment, Assault Tied to High Blood Pressure in Women

    Sexual assault and workplace sexual harassment may increase women's long-term risk of high blood pressure and heart disease, a new study suggests.

    High blood pressure is a major risk factor for heart disease, which is the leading killer of U.S. women, accounting for one in three deaths.

    Sexual ...

    Study Finds No Heart Benefit From Veggies. Nutritionists Disagree.

    Eating vegetables may not help protect you against heart disease, according to a new study that's triggered strong reactions from critics.

    The analysis of the diets of nearly 400,000 British adults found that raw vegetables could benefit the heart, but not cooked vegetables. However, the resea...

    Autism, ADHD Raise the Odds for Early Death

    Young people with autism or attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) have a higher risk of dying early from a range of causes, a new research review suggests.

    Researchers found that before middle-age, people with autism face higher-than-average rates of death from both "natural" causes, like heart disease, and "unnatural" ones, including accidents and suicide.

    Meanwhile, unna...