Get Healthy!

Results for search "Heart / Stroke-Related: High Blood Pressure".

Health News Results - 315

Four Factors in Midlife Predict a Healthy Old Age for Women

Examining a woman's health in midlife can predict her health decades later, researchers say.

Four specific factors — higher body mass index (BMI), smoking, arthritis and depressive symptoms — at age 55 are associated with clinically important declines in physical health 10 years later, a new study reports.

"Age 55 to 65 may be a critical decade," said study co-author Dr. Daniel ...

Deaths Linked to High Blood Pressure in Pregnant Women Are Soaring

The number of American women with chronic high blood pressure who are dying during and after pregnancy is up sharply, a new study warns.

Of 155 million births in the United States between 1979 and 2018, more than 3,200 mothers died of high blood pressure-related causes— a 15-fold rise over the period. The risk was particularly high among Black women, according to

  • Steven Reinberg HealthDay Reporter
  • |
  • January 5, 2022
  • |
  • Full Page
  • 'Benign' Adrenal Gland Tumors Might Cause Harm to Millions

    Millions of people are at increased risk of type 2 diabetes and high blood pressure and don't even know it, due to a hidden hormone problem in their bodies.

    As many as 1 in 10 people have a non-cancerous tumor on one or both of their adrenal glands that could cause the gland to produce excess amounts of the stress hormone cortisol.

    Up to now, doctors have thought that these tumors h...

    Shoveling Snow? Beware of Heart Hazards

    Don't let a picture-perfect snowfall turn deadly.

    Shoveling snow can cause heart attacks or sudden cardiac arrest in folks with heart conditions and even in those who are unaware that they have heart disease, the American Heart Association (AHA) warns.

    "Shoveli...

    Who's Dying Young in U.S. From Heart Attacks?

    Fewer Americans are dying prematurely from heart attack compared with years ago, but progress has stalled out in the past decade, new research shows.

    For the study, the researchers examined 20 years of data on heart attack deaths among Americans under 65 — deaths that are considered "premature."

    The bigger picture looked good: Between 1999 and 2019, those deaths declined by 52%.

    COVID Helps Drive Nearly Two-Year Decline in U.S. Life Expectancy

    WEDNESDAY, Dec. 22, 2021 (HealthDay News) - - COVID-19 is now the third leading cause of death for Americans and has shortened life expectancy by nearly two years, a drop not seen since World War II, a new government report shows.

    Life expectancy dropped from 78.8 in 2010 to 77 in 2020 as the age-adjusted death rate increased 17%, going from 715 deaths per 100,000 people in 2019 to 835 d...

    Global Rate of Stroke Cases, Deaths Still Too High

    While strokes and related deaths have declined in rich nations, they remain stubbornly high worldwide, a new study says.

    Author Liyuan Han attributed the overall decreases to "better medical services in high-income countries, which may offer earlier detection of stroke risk factors and better control" of them.

    “But even in these countries, the total number of people with

  • Robert Preidt
  • |
  • December 16, 2021
  • |
  • Full Page
  • Many Home Health Care Workers in Poor Health Themselves

    They take care of others, but many U.S. home health care workers say they're not in good shape themselves, a new study finds.

    Researchers analyzed self-reported data collected from nearly 3,000 home health care workers in 38 states between 2014 and 2018 and found that more than a quarter rated their general health as fair or poor, 1 in 5 reported poor mental health, and 14% reported poor ...

    Pandemic Sent Americans' Blood Pressure Numbers Skyward

    Yet another pandemic-related health woe has come to the fore: rising blood pressure.

    Data covering almost half a million middle-aged Americans shows that about 27% saw their blood pressure go up significantly in 2020 after COVID-19 restrictions unfolded compared to the prior year. Women appeared to be particularly vulnerable.

    Still,...

    Many People With High Blood Pressure May Take a Drug That Worsens It: Study

    Nearly 1 in 5 people with hypertension may be unintentionally taking a drug for another condition that causes their blood pressure to climb even higher, a new study suggests.

    Left untreated or undertreated, high blood pressure will increase your risk for heart attack, stroke, kidney disease and vision problems by damaging blood vessels. Lifestyle changes such as weight loss, restricting ...

    Advances in Care, Impact of COVID Highlights of Latest Cardiologists' Meeting

    The COVID-19 pandemic, heart-healthy eating, and better ways to treat and prevent heart disease were among the hot topics that emerged during the American Heart Association's annual meeting this week.

    "I was at the sessions yesterday, I was actually in clinic this morning, and there were things I learned at the sessions that are affecting how I care for my patients," Dr. Manesh Patel, cha...

    A Little Coffee May Be Healthy in Pregnancy

    Many women dread having to give up coffee during their pregnancy, but new research suggests that consuming a little caffeine while expecting might not necessarily be a bad thing.

    "While we were not able to study the association of consumption above the recommended limit, we now know that low-to-moderate caffeine is not associated with an increased risk of gestational diabetes, preeclampsi...

    Hospitalizations for Spikes in Blood Pressure Are on the Rise

    Despite a nationwide effort to control blood pressure, the number of seniors hospitalized for a sudden, sharp rise in blood pressure surged over the last two decades in the United States.

    The largest increase was among Black Americans, with the highest rates in the South, new research shows.

    The aim of the study was to "evaluate whether we have made any progress in the last 20 years...

    Why Are Young Black Americans Becoming Less Heart-Healthy?

    Young, Black Americans are experiencing significant spikes in obesity, type 2 diabetes and smoking, all risk factors for heart attack and stroke.

    Between 2007 and 2017 -- before the COVID-19 pandemic and the concerns it has created -- hospitalized Black Americans aged 18 to 44 had sharp increases in these risks. They were also having higher rates of health complications and poor hospital ...

    Firefighters' Blood Pressure Can Rise When Duty Calls

    Working in an already dangerous environment, the blood pressure of firefighters jumps when they get an emergency call, new research shows.

    That could be risky for those who already have high blood pressure, experts say.

    "All emergency and first responders should be aware of their health," said senior author Deborah Feairheller, director of the clinical cardiac program at the Univer...

    Could 'Brown Fat' Make Some Obese People Healthier?

    All body fat is not the same.

    And a new study suggests that folks who have more of what's known as brown fat may have a lower risk of weight-related health problems, such as diabetes and high blood pressure.

    "Brown fat has long been thought to benefit metabolism because, unlike the much more common white storage...

    Insomnia Tied to Raised Risk of Aneurysm

    Researchers may have unearthed a surprising risk factor for often-fatal brain bleeds: Sleepless nights.

    In a study of about 70,000 adults, researchers found that people with a genetic predisposition to insomnia were at somewhat higher risk of a brain aneurysm. An aneurysm is a weak spot in an artery wall that bulges out and fills with blood. In some cases, it can rupture and cause life-th...

    China, U.S. Lead World in Saltiest Processed Meats, Fish

    China and the United States are super powers of salt consumption.

    The two world leaders emerged with the highest salt levels in processed meat and fish products among five countries assessed in a new study.

    High salt levels in food is a major cause of high blood pressure and its related risks of heart and kidney diseases and death. The World Health Organization recommends a maximum ...

    FDA Reduces Recommended Salt Levels in Americans' Food

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced Wednesday that it is lowering the recommended levels of sodium in processed, packaged and prepared foods.

    The goal of the new, voluntary guideline is to help reduce Americans' average sodium intake from 3,400 milligrams (mg) to 3,000 mg per day — roughly a 12% reduction — over the next 2.5 years.

    "It's really a pivotal day for the ...

    Lengthening Menstrual Cycles Near Menopause Could Predict Heart Health

    The length of a woman's menstrual cycle as she nears menopause could reflect her future risk of heart disease, researchers report.

    Some women's menstrual cycles become longer as they approach menopause, while others' cycles remain stable. This new study found that the women whose cycle increased in length two years before menopause had better measures of vascular health than those who had...

    Many Older Americans Who Should Be Checking Blood Pressure at Home Aren't: Poll

    If you are over 50 and you have high blood pressure or a health condition for which blood pressure control is essential, at-home blood pressure checks can avert medical emergencies.

    The trouble is that too few of these people actually perform them, a new survey reveals.

    "This poll shows that we have more work to do to encourage older adults with certain chronic health conditions to ...

    Two Meds Better Than One for Many With High Blood Pressure: Study

    Nearly half of Americans have high blood pressure and only 24% have it under control, but what's the best way to treat it -- one high-dose pill or two at a lower dose?

    A large new study suggests that two medications may be better than one for many older patients. Lowering elevated blood pressure to a sustainable level is important because it reduces a patient's risk of heart attack, strok...

    Shape, Size of Brain Arteries May Predict Stroke Risk

    The size and shape of the blood vessels in your brain may help predict your risk of an often-fatal type of stroke, called an aneurysm, a new study finds.

    An aneurysm is a bulge in an artery wall.

    "A subarachnoid hemorrhage is the most dangerous type of stroke and occurs when a brain aneurysm leaks or ruptures, causing bleeding into the brain, killing more than 50% of affected people...

    Obese? Lose Lots of Weight, Watch Your Heart Risks Drop

    It's no secret that excess weight is bad for the heart. But a new study suggests that obese people who lose a substantial amount of weight may reverse the related cardiovascular risks.

    Researchers found the odds for high blood pressure and elevated cholesterol were similar in formerly obese Americans who were now at a healthy weight and people who had always had a healthy weight.

    Di...

    What Blood Sugar Levels Best Protect Against Heart Trouble in Those With Diabetes?

    For people with diabetes who have a stroke, there may be an ideal blood sugar target to prevent another one or a heart attack, a South Korean study finds.

    To determine average blood sugar levels over the past two to three months, the study team used the hemoglobin A1C test.

    "We know that having diabetes may be associated with an increased risk of having a first stroke," said study a...

    Older Women, Younger Men Struggle More to Control High Blood Pressure

    Roughly a third of Americans on high blood pressure medications do not have their blood pressure under control, a new study reveals.

    And younger men and older women are particularly vulnerable, researchers warn.

    "Although this phenomenon has been hinted at in the medical literature, it is a bit surprising to me as we should not expect anyone to have uncontrolled blood pressure, espe...

    Better Diet, More Exercise Equals Better Blood Pressure

    People with high blood pressure that doesn't respond to treatment may have more success by following the DASH diet and joining a supervised diet and exercise program, a new study suggests.

    DASH is short for Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension — a regimen rich in fruits, vegetables, low-fat dairy products and limited salt.

    Duke University researchers found it can help people wi...

    Smartphone Apps May Aid in Heart Attack Recovery

    After a heart attack, a smartwatch app may help keep patients from being hospitalized again, researchers say.

    The app helps patients keep track of medications and make lifestyle changes. It may also reduce rehospitalization in the month after discharge by half, according to a new report.

    The American Heart Association says one in six heart attack patients returns to the hospital wit...

    Diabetes Drug Might Help Women With Preeclampsia Prolong Their Pregnancy

    Metformin, a commonly prescribed diabetes drug, may help stave off preterm birth among women who develop pregnancy-related high blood pressure.

    Preeclampsia is marked by a sudden spike in blood pressure, protein in urine, or other problems during pregnancy. Preterm preeclampsia occurs between 26 and 32 weeks of pregnancy and often leads to early delivery, putting babies at risk. Preemies ...

    Dairy Foods May Be Good for You After All

    You remember the ad. It asked if you've "got milk?" and said that "milk does a body good."

    So, does it? New research suggests it might.

    In the study, people who consumed more dairy fat actually had a lower risk of cardiovascular disease than those who drank or ate less dairy, CNN reported.

    "Increasing evidence suggests that the health impact of dairy foods ma...

    4 Out of 10 Adults With No Known Heart Disease Have Fatty Hearts: Study

    Many middle-aged adults with apparently healthy hearts have a "silent" buildup of fatty deposits in their arteries, a large, new study shows.

    Researchers found that of more than 25,000 50- to 64-year-olds, about 42% had signs of atherosclerosis — a buildup of "plaques" in the arteries that can lead to a heart attack or stroke.

    That was despite the fact that none had any history of...

    AHA News: A Year of Committed Exercise in Middle Age Reversed Worrisome Heart Stiffness

    A year of exercise training helped to preserve or increase the youthful elasticity of the heart muscle among people showing early signs of heart failure, a small study shows.

    The new research, published Sept. 20 in the American Heart Association journal Circulation, bolsters the idea that "exercise is medicine," an important shift in approach, the researchers wrote.

    The stu...

    Common Eye Conditions Tied to Higher Risk for Dementia

    Diseases that can rob you of vision as you age also appear to be tied to an increased risk for dementia, a new study finds.

    Specifically, age-related macular degeneration, cataracts and diabetes-related eye disease were linked with a higher likelihood of dementia, researchers in China said. However, one other common eye ailment, glaucoma, was not linked to dementia risk.

    The new stu...

    More Evidence That Stress Gets Blood Pressure Rising

    MONDAY, Sept. 13, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- If you often feel stressed out, your blood pressure may rise over time alongside higher odds for other heart concerns, a new study indicates.

    Researchers found adults with normal blood pressure but high levels of stress hormones were more likely to develop high blood pressure in six to seven years than those with lower stress hormone levels.

    ...

    Heading to the Mountains? Heart Patients Should Check With Their Doctor First

    If the Alps or the Rockies are on your bucket list, check with your doctor first if you're at risk for cardiovascular disease.

    New advice from the American Heart Association (AHA) suggests certain people take precautions before going to high altitude places.

    These recommendations apply to folks with high blood pressure, coronary artery disease, heart rhythm abnormalities (arrhy...

    Breastfeeding May Strengthen a Baby's Heart

    Breast milk can give preemies' hearts a big boost, a groundbreaking study suggests.

    "This study … adds to the already known benefits of breast milk for infants born prematurely," said study leader Dr. Afif El-Khuffash, a clinical professor of pediatrics at the Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland (RCSI) University of Medicine and Health Sciences in Dublin.

    He said the findings off...

    4-in-1 Blood Pressure Pill Could Improve Outcomes

    A four-in-one pill containing "ultra-low doses" of different medications can provide better blood pressure control than standard drug treatment, a new clinical trial from Australia shows.

    About 80% of people given the "quadpill" achieved a healthy blood pressure of 140/90 within three months and continuing out to a year, compared to 60% of people who started on a single medication and add...

    Getting Healthy After Heart Attack Could Add Over 7 Years to Life

    Heart attack survivors could gain more than seven healthy years of life if they take the right medications and improve their lifestyle, new research estimates.

    Unfortunately, studies have found, heart attack survivors rarely get optimal control over their risk factors.

    The new research echoes that evidence: Of more than 3,200 patients, only 2% had their blood pressure, cholesterol a...

    Why Water Is Key to Your Heart's Health

    Everyone knows that drinking plenty of water every day can improve your health in a myriad of ways, but here's a lesser-known benefit: New research suggests that middle-aged adults can lower their long-term risk for heart failure by simply drinking enough water on a daily basis.

    The finding follows an analysis that stacked heart health up against blood salt levels -- an indicator for over...

    A Little Wine & Certain Foods Could Help Keep Blood Pressure Healthy

    An apple and a pear a day may help keep blood pressure under control -- a benefit partly explained by gut bacteria, a new study suggests.

    Researchers found that adults who regularly ate certain foods -- apples, pears, berries and red wine -- tended to have lower blood pressure than their peers.

    One thing those foods have in common is a high content of antioxidant plant compounds cal...

    Dangerous Diabetes Tied to Pregnancy Is on the Rise

    Growing numbers of pregnant women are developing gestational diabetes, putting them and their babies at risk for complications later on.

    Gestational diabetes is a type of diabetes that develops during pregnancy in women who weren't already diabetic.

    Between 2011 and 2019, rates of gestational diabetes in the United States jumped 30%, according to a large nationwide study of first-ti...

    Wildfires Ravage Firefighters' Long-Term Physical, Mental Health

    Roaring, fast-moving blazes. Choking smoke. Fiery tornados. Thunderstorms and lightning.

    The Dixie Fire -- now the single largest wildfire in California history -- continues to spread, having burned through more than 750 square miles of forest land north of Sacramento.

    The astonishing spread of smoke from the fire, causing discomfort and illness to people hundreds or thousands of mi...

    Climate Change Worsens Wildfires, Bringing Poorer Health to All

    Smoke from wildfires burning along the West Coast is choking the entire United States, reminding everyone of the hazards of climate change.

    But that haze isn't just stinging your eyes and choking your breath -- it poses a direct threat to your health, experts say.

    Wildfire smoke has been shown to increase risk of heart attacks and strokes, as well as lung ailments like asthma, Ameri...

    Sleep Apnea Doubles Odds for Sudden Death

    With apologies to William Shakespeare, this is the stuff bad dreams are made of: Sleep apnea may double your risk for sudden death.

    The condition -- in which a person's airway is repeatedly blocked during sleep, causing pauses in breathing -- may also increase the risk for high blood pressure, coronary artery disease and congestive heart failure, new research shows.

    "This [study] ad...

    AHA News: Dangers of Life-Threatening Second Heart Attack May Be Highest Soon After the First

    A first heart attack is a serious, life-changing event, although most people now survive them. But a new study underscores the importance of doing everything possible to avoid another one.

    "It's like taking another hit," said Dr. Umesh Khot, a cardiologist at the Cleveland Clinic in Ohio. "One heart attack is a lot, and having another one is a big hit on the heart."

    Khot is lead aut...

    High Blood Pressure: Which Drug Works Best for You?

    Two long used types of blood pressure drugs are equally effective, but the less popular one seems to have fewer side effects, according to a large "real-world" study.

    The two classes of medication are both recommended as "first-line" treatments for high blood pressure: angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs).

    ACE inhibitors have been a...

    The Heat Is On: Staying Safe When Temperatures Soar

    Midsummer heat and high humidity aren't just uncomfortable -- they're a combo that can cause serious illness and even death.

    "Whenever you walk or do outdoor activity, take a friend with you who can help you if you run into trouble," Dr. Eleanor Dunham advised. She's an emergency medicine doctor at Penn State Health Milton S. Hershey Medical Center in Hershey, Pa.

    Babies and seniors...

    Stronger Hearts, Better Outcomes in Pregnancy: Study

    Thinking of starting a family? Start getting your heart in shape. New research suggests that how healthy a woman's heart is before conception affects outcomes in her pregnancy.

    Study author Dr. Sadiya Khan said the findings make a case for more comprehensive heart assessments prior to pregnancy rather than focusing on isolated individual risk factors, such as high blood pressure ("hyperte...

    Eating Meat Raises Risk of Heart Disease: Study

    Eating beef, lamb, pork and processed meats spells trouble for your heart, and the more you eat, the worse it gets, new research warns.

    The meta-analysis -- an overview of data from a large number of studies -- included more than 1.4 million people who were followed for 30 years. It found that for each 1.75 ounces of beef, lamb and pork consumed, the risk of heart disease rose 9%, CNN...

    Breastfed Babies Have Healthier Blood Pressure as Kids

    Here's another reason for new moms to give breastfeeding a try: Toddlers who were breastfed for even a few days have lower blood pressure than those who always got a bottle, research finds.

    And lower blood pressure at an early age may lead to a healthier heart and blood vessels in adulthood, researchers said.

    The new study is believed to be the first to investigate breastfeeding in...