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Heart Disease Remains No. 1 Killer, But COVID Will Have Big Impact

Heart disease is likely to remain the world's leading cause of death for years to come, partially due to effects of the COVID-19 pandemic, an American Heart Association report predicts.

Heart disease deaths worldwide rose 17.1% over the past decade, with nearly 18.6 million people dying of heart disease in 2019. There were more than 523.2 million cases of heart disease in 2019 -- up 26.6%...

Exercise Doesn't Boost Health If You Stay Obese, Study Finds

The harmful effects of obesity on the heart can't be undone by exercise, and it's not possible to be "fat but healthy," Spanish researchers warn.

"Exercise does not seem to compensate for the negative effects of excess weight," said study author Alejandro Lucia, a professor of exercise physiology at European University in Madrid.

The study findings "refute the notion that a physica...

Diabetes Boosts Odds for Heart Trouble 10-fold in Younger Women

THURSDAY, Jan. 21, 2021 (HealthDay News) - - With rising obesity rates, more young women American women are developing type 2 diabetes, putting them at hugely increased risk for heart disease, new research shows.

In fact, the study found that women under 55 with type 2 diabetes had a tenfold greater risk of having heart disease over the next two decades compared to their non-diabetic peer...

Tips for Parents of Kids With Diabetes

Kids with diabetes can lead full, fun lives, but they have special needs. Here's what parents should know.

Diabetes is common among American children. More than 205,000 kids and teens have the disease, and cases are rising.

Age makes a difference in the type of diabetes a child is likely to have.

"Most children younger than age 10 with diabetes have type 1," said Dr. Santhosh ...

Vision Problems? Here's a Guide to Which Specialist Is Right for You

If you're having eye problems, you may not know which type of specialist to consult.

Here's some help from experts who explain the roles of an optometrist, ophthalmologist, pediatric ophthalmologist, orthoptist and optician.

Optometrists provide comprehensive eye care, including evaluations for glasses and contact lenses and common eye diseases.

"They play a role in monitoring...

Common Diabetes Meds Tied to Serious COVID-19 Complication

Diabetics who've contracted COVID-19 should suspend their use of a class of common diabetes drugs known as sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 inhibitors (SGLT2i), new research warns.

People using these medications for diabetes are at risk of a potentially fatal complication called diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), and it now appears that risk increases even more if they become sick with COVID-19,...

Calorie-Burning 'Brown Fat' Could Help Keep You Healthy, Even if You're Obese

A special calorie-burning type of body fat appears to help protect against an array of chronic ailments, including heart disease, type 2 diabetes and high blood pressure, a new study suggests.

Brown fat generates heat by drawing glucose from the bloodstream, as opposed to energy-storing white fat, explained senior researcher Dr. Paul Cohen. He's an assistant professor and senior attending...

Heart Risk Factors May Be Especially Unhealthy in People With Psoriasis

People with metabolic syndrome and the skin condition psoriasis are at especially high risk for heart attack and stroke, a new study warns.

Psoriasis has been known to increase the risk of heart disease, but researchers have now pegged metabolic syndrome as a key reason.

Metabolic syndrome is a condition that includes obesity, diabetes, high cholesterol and high blood pressure -- al...

Surgery, Drugs Similar for Treating Severe Diabetic Eye Disease

Surgery and injectable drugs are equally effective in treating a serious diabetes-related eye condition, a new study indicates.

It included 205 patients with bleeding inside the eye due to proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR), a disorder in which new, abnormal blood vessels grow in the retina.

These blood vessels often bleed into the gel-like vitreous that fills the eye, resulti...

Type 2 Diabetes in Youth Is Especially Unhealthy: Study

The earlier in life type 2 diabetes arises, the deadlier it is, a new analysis finds.

The study, which pooled the results of 26 previous ones, revealed a clear pattern: The younger people were when they developed type 2 diabetes, the greater their risk of complications like heart disease and stroke.

For each year type 2 diabetes was delayed, the risk of blood vessel diseases fell by...

Dogs and Their Humans Share Same Diabetes Risk: Study

If your dog has diabetes, there's a better chance that you do, too, or that you may develop the disease.

A new study from researchers in Sweden and the United Kingdom found that owning a dog with diabetes was tied to a 38% increased risk of type 2 diabetes for the dog owner.

The risk of developing diabetes was also 28% higher in dogs with an owner who had type 2 diabetes compared ...

U.S. Moms-to-Be Are Much Less Healthy Now

In the past 30 years, U.S. women have been in progressively worse physical shape as they become pregnant, a new study finds.

A combination of obesity, high blood pressure, diabetes and having children later in life have led to potentially more complications, and even infant and maternal death, researchers say.

Obesity is a major driver of these complications, said lead researcher Dr...

Obesity Plays Role in Higher Breast Cancer Rates for Black Women

Obesity may be a major reason Black American women with early breast cancer are 40% more likely to die than white patients, according to a new study.

Obesity is a known risk factor for several types of cancer, and decades of rising rates of obesity in the United States have contributed to climbing breast cancer rates greater in Black women than white women.

And even though breast ca...

High Blood Sugar Ups COVID Risks, Even in Non-Diabetics

COVID-19 patients with abnormally high blood sugar are at increased risk for serious illness and death, even if they don't have diabetes, new research shows.

The study included more than 11,300 non-critically ill adults with COVID-19 who were hospitalized in Spain between March and the end of May 2020. Of those, 19% were previously diagnosed with diabetes.

In all, one in five patien...

Diabetes, High Blood Pressure Raise Odds of COVID Harming Brain

COVID-19 patients with high blood pressure or diabetes may be more likely to develop critical neurological complications, including bleeding in the brain and stroke, according to an ongoing study.

University of Pennsylvania researchers studied COVID-19 patients who had a head CT scan or MRI within their health system between January and April 2020. In all, 81 of the 1,357 COVID-19 patien...

Heart Anatomy May Put Blacks at Higher Stroke Risk

Black Americans face a heightened risk of stroke, and a new study suggests that abnormalities in the heart's upper chambers play a role.

Experts said the findings, published Nov. 25 in the journal Neurology, point to an under-recognized factor in Black Americans' stroke risk.

It has long been known that in the United States, Black adults are particularly hard-hit by ischemi...

After Heart Attack, Pot Smoking Raises Post-Op Dangers

Election Day 2020 saw marijuana legalization continue its march across the United States, but a pair of new studies warn that smoking pot could increase risk for heart patients.

Marijuana smokers are more likely to suffer complications like excess bleeding or stroke if they undergo angioplasty to reopen clogged arteries, a University of Michigan-led study found.

Pot smokers who've h...

Spotting the Symptoms of Diabetic Retinopathy

Most Americans over 40 don't know the signs of diabetic retinopathy, a new survey finds.

The condition affects nearly 8 million Americans, and that number is expected to double by 2050, but most adults don't know facts about diabetic retinopathy that could help save their sight.

The survey of 1,000 U.S. adults by the American Society of Retina Specialists (ASRS) found 47% didn't kno...

For Some Black Women, DNA Could Magnify Racism's Toll on Health

Many aspects of daily living can trigger stress. But for Black women, everyday stressors plus racial discrimination and a specific genetic mutation may increase the risk for obesity, diabetes and heart disease, researchers say.

The EBF1 mutation is found in roughly 2% of Black women and 7% of white people. And according to study co-author Abanish Singh, it has previously been lin...

Coffee, Green Tea Might Extend Life for Folks With Type 2 Diabetes

If you've got type 2 diabetes and love drinking green tea or coffee, new research suggests you may be reducing your odds of a premature death.

But you need to really love these drinks. The study found that having four or more cups of green tea along with two cups of coffee daily was linked to a 63% lower risk of death during the average five-year follow-up.

On t...

Minimally Invasive Procedure May Free Type 2 Diabetics From Insulin

A small study suggests that a new procedure that treats part of the intestine just beyond the stomach may allow people with type 2 diabetes to safely stop taking insulin.

The procedure -- which resurfaces the duodenum -- was combined with a popular kind of diabetes medication called GLP-1 receptor agonists (such as Victoza, Trulicity, Ozempic) and counseling on lifestyle factors, such a...

Weight-Loss Surgery May Cut Pancreatic Cancer Risk in People With Diabetes

Weight-loss surgery significantly reduces the risk of pancreatic cancer in obese people with diabetes, a new study finds.

For the study, the researchers analyzed 20 years of data from 1.4 million people, including more than 10,000 who'd had weight-loss surgery. About three-quarters of those who had weight-loss surgery were women.

People who'd had weight-loss surgery were les...

Sleep Apnea Aid Eases Heart Problems in People With Prediabetes

Continuous positive airway pressure treatment, commonly known as CPAP, can lower heart disease risk in people with prediabetes, according to a new study.

In prediabetes, blood sugar levels are above normal but not high enough to be considered diabetes. CPAP is used to treat obstructive sleep apnea, a disorder in which breathing repeatedly stops and starts during sleep. A CPAP machine ...

Has the Pandemic Changed Type 1 Diabetes Care for Good?

When the COVID-19 pandemic began, many doctors started providing care via telemedicine. Now, a new survey of people with type 1 diabetes suggests many like remote care and hope it continues in the future.

Among the survey respondents who had a telemedicine visit during the pandemic, 86% found the remote appointments useful, and 75% said they planned on having remote appointme...

Common Heartburn Meds Tied to Higher Diabetes Risk

Often-used drugs called proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) ease heartburn symptoms, but a new study suggests they might also increase the risk of type 2 diabetes.

Chinese researchers drew on information from studies of more than 200,000 U.S. health care professionals and found that regular use of PPIs (such as Aciphex, Nexium, Prilosec, Prevacid, Protonix) was associated with a 24% hi...

Pancreas Size, Shape Can Return to Normal in Diabetes Remission: Study

Reversing type 2 diabetes can restore the pancreas to its normal size and shape, a new study finds.

Previous research found that with remission of type 2 diabetes through significant weight loss, natural insulin-production can return to levels similar to people who have never had diabetes.

The new study is the first to show that reversing diabetes can also affect the size an...

Why Early Bedtime May Be Best for People With Type 2 Diabetes

It's long been said that early to bed, early to rise can make you healthy, wealthy and wise. Now, new research supports at least the health benefits.

A study of people with type 2 diabetes found that night owls -- people who go to bed late and get up late -- tend to get little exercise, putting their health at greater risk.

Understanding how sleep time can affect physical ...

Diabetes During Pregnancy Could Raise Lifelong Heart Risks for Children

The foundation for early heart disease might begin not during childhood or in the years that follow, but in the womb.

Researchers studying nearly 30 years of data from families in Manitoba, Canada, found a strong connection between heart disease risk factors in teens and young adults and their mother's type 2 or gestational diabetes.

"I was surprised at the strength of the a...

Kids Who Need Steroids Face Risk of Diabetes, Other Ills

Children who need to take oral steroids for chronic or life-threatening conditions can experience serious side effects, according to new research.

Children with autoimmune disorders such as juvenile arthritis, psoriasis or inflammatory bowel disease are often prescribed a steroid to keep the illness under control.

But the odds that a child might develop diabetes was nearly s...

Once-a-Week Insulin for Type 2 Diabetes Shows Promise in Early Trial

Type 2 diabetes can be tough to control without medication. But for some people, the thought of daily shots makes them delay or avoid starting insulin therapy.

Now, new research offers some hope for those insulin avoiders -- a once-a-week insulin injection may someday replace daily shots.

A phase 2 trial compared the new weekly insulin, called icodec, to the commonly used i...

More Than 1 Drink a Day Ups Blood Pressure for Diabetics

It's probably a good idea to skip that second glass of wine if you have diabetes, because new research suggests that having more than one drink daily raises your risk of high blood pressure.

People with type 2 diabetes who had eight or more drinks a week (moderate drinkers) had more than 60% higher odds of having high blood pressure, according to the study. They also tended to ha...

Can COVID-19 Cause Diabetes?

A COVID-19 infection can cause a lot of serious, sometimes lingering health problems, like lung damage, kidney damage and ongoing heart issues. Lately, research has suggested it may also cause the sudden onset of insulin-dependent diabetes.

A new report details the case of a 19-year-old German with asymptomatic COVID-19 infection who ended up hospitalized with a new case of insulin...

A Guide to Managing Children's Diabetes During COVID-19

Parents worry that COVID-19 can make a diabetic child's condition worse, but an expert has some tips for keeping kids healthy during the pandemic.

"If a child has good control of their diabetes, it does not seem as though there will be severe effects if they were to get the virus," said Dr. Michael Yafi, an associate professor of pediatric endocrinology at McGovern Medical School at ...

Whether From Diet or Surgery, Weight Loss Has Same Benefits: Study

The metabolic benefits of weight loss in severely obese people are the same whether they lose excess pounds through dieting or surgery, a new study says.

That suggests that weight loss alone, not any effects of weight-loss (bariatric) surgery, is responsible for metabolic improvements such as better blood sugar control and diabetes remission, according to researchers at the Washington...

Pandemic Means Financial Hardship for Many With Diabetes

People with diabetes face a higher risk of developing complications from COVID-19, but a new survey reports they have also suffered more economic fallout from the pandemic.

In June, 18% of people with diabetes were out of work compared to 12% of the general population. And one-third of people with diabetes have lost at least some income since the pandemic began versus about 2...

Have Diabetes? Don't Lose Sight of Danger to Your Eyes

Diabetes can wreak havoc on many parts of the body, including the eyes, but people with diabetes aren't doomed to have vision problems.

With good blood sugar management and regular eye exams, many eye conditions can be prevented or treated, experts say.

Patricia Welter, a Pilates studio owner from Palm Harbor, Fla., wishes she'd known more about preventing eye problems rel...

What Athletes Should Know About COVID-19, Heart Damage and Working Out

With evidence mounting that COVID-19 can damage the heart, experts urge people to take precautions when doing vigorous exercise.

Up to 30% of patients hospitalized with coronavirus infection have signs of cardiac injury, according to Dr. Sunal Makadia, health director of sports cardiology at LifeBridge Health in Baltimore.

The prevalence of heart damage in milder cases o...

The Fitter Do Better After an A-Fib Treatment

Physically fit patients with the irregular heartbeat atrial fibrillation (AF) are most likely to benefit from ablation, a new study finds.

Patients who are less fit are hospitalized more often, continue to use anti-arrhythmic drugs longer and have higher death rates, researchers say.

"AF does not occur in a vacuum but rather represents one manifestation of the impact of po...

America's Progress Against Early Cardiovascular Death Is Slowing

From the 1960s to the 2010s, the United States experienced a major reduction in heart disease-related deaths among younger adults -- often called premature cardiac death.

But that decline has slowed significantly since 2010, and the risk of premature cardiovascular death may depend on where you live, according to a study published July 29 in the Journal of the American Heart Associ...

Common Diabetes Meds Linked to Higher Odds for a Serious Complication

People taking a class of diabetes medications called SGLT2s have up to three times the risk for a serious complication called diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) compared to people taking another drug, new research reveals.

SGLT2 (sodium-glucose cotransporter-2) inhibitors -- such as Farxiga, Jardiance and Invokana -- are a newer type of oral diabetes medicine. This class of medications is k...

AHA News: Controlling Diabetes Takes on Greater Urgency During COVID-19 Pandemic

Uncontrolled blood sugar is dangerous at any time. But with mounting evidence showing that COVID-19 places people with diabetes at higher risk for severe illness, the need to keep diabetes well-managed has become more important than ever.

"Diabetes is itself a risk factor for a more severe case of COVID-19," said Dr. Prakash Deedwania, professor of medicine at the University of Californ...

Chronic Conditions Tied to Severe COVID-19 More Common in Southeast, Rural Areas

Obesity. Diabetes. Heart disease. COPD. Kidney disease. These chronic medical conditions all raise the risk of suffering a severe case of COVID-19, but a new government report shows some parts of the United States are far more vulnerable to these risks than others.

In a review of more than 3,000 U.S. counties, researchers from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found ...

Stressful Days, Worse Blood Sugar Control for People With Diabetes

When something as routine as grocery shopping might lead to a deadly COVID-19 infection, stress is inevitable -- and that extra tension can make it harder for people with diabetes to manage their disease.

The reason? The stress hormone cortisol is linked to higher blood sugar levels, according to a new study.

Under stress, the body releases cortisol, which leads to an inc...

COVID-19 May Trigger High Blood Sugar, Raising Death Risk: Study

Bodies stressed by severe COVID-19 could produce abnormally high blood sugar levels, even in people without diagnosed diabetes. And that appears tied to a doubling of the odds of dying from COVID-19, Chinese researchers report.

High blood sugar (glucose) levels, measured at the time of admission to the hospital, were also linked to more severe disease and complications, according to r...

Upping Fruit, Veggies, Grain Intake Can Cut Your Diabetes Risk by 25%

Eating more fruits, vegetables and whole grain foods could lower your risk of type 2 diabetes, two new studies suggest.

In one study, researchers looked at more than 9,700 people who developed type 2 diabetes and over 13,600 who didn't. Participants were from eight European countries and part of a long-term cancer and nutrition study.

After adjusting for lifestyle, and soci...

Follow Exercise Guidelines and You'll Live Longer, Study Says

Getting the recommended amount of exercise could cut your risk of early death, a new study indicates.

U.S. government guidelines recommend at least 150 minutes of moderate intensity or at least 75 minutes of vigorous intensity aerobic activity a week. They also suggest adults do moderate or greater intensity muscle-strengthening exercise at least two days a week.

That effort...

Animal Tests Point to Possible Path to Ultrafast Insulin

An experimental ultrafast-acting insulin could work four times quicker than current fast-acting formulas, researchers say.

For the study, the researchers focused on a form of insulin called monomeric insulin. Though its structure should, in theory, allow it to act faster, monomeric insulin is too unstable for practical use, so the Stanford University team had to find a way around that...

Numbers of Non-COVID-19 Deaths Up During Pandemic

Nearly one-third of excess deaths in the early stages of the coronavirus pandemic in the United States were linked to causes other than COVID-19, but that doesn't mean that the virus didn't play a role in those deaths, a new study claims.

The researchers found there were just over 87,000 excess deaths in the United States between March 1 and April 25. Excess deaths are those above the...

COVID-19 Blood Test Might Predict Who Will Need a Ventilator

A blood test may predict which COVID-19 patients are likely to need a ventilator.

This finding could lead to a scoring system that would flag at-risk patients for closer monitoring and to personalized treatments. It may also help explain how diabetes makes outcomes worse, according to researchers from the University of Virginia School of Medicine.

The study focused on 57 C...

Exercise Might Make Breast Milk's Goodness Even Better

Exercise is part of a healthy lifestyle, but a new study suggests it also increases the amount of a beneficial compound called 3SL in the breast milk of both humans and mice.

Based on that, researchers think that its benefits to babies could last for decades, potentially making them less likely to experience such chronic illnesses as obesity, type 2 diabetes and heart disease as they ...

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