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24 May

Lost Weight? Here’s One Way To Keep It Off, According To A New Study

People who successfully maintain weight loss sit less and step away from their computers more, researchers find

09 Mar

Gaining Belly Fat During Menopause Poses Heart Danger

Waist circumference is a better indicator of heart disease risk than weight or BMI in menopausal women, researchers say

Health News Results - 143

Fertility Treatments Don't Raise Odds for Smaller, Preemie Babies

Babies conceived through infertility treatment are more likely to be born early and small.

But there are reasons other than medically assisted reproduction to explain this difference, a

  • Cara Murez
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  • January 12, 2022
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  • Four Factors in Midlife Predict a Healthy Old Age for Women

    Examining a woman's health in midlife can predict her health decades later, researchers say.

    Four specific factors — higher body mass index (BMI), smoking, arthritis and depressive symptoms — at age 55 are associated with clinically important declines in physical health 10 years later, a new study reports.

    "Age 55 to 65 may be a critical decade," said study co-author Dr. Daniel ...

    Big Review Confirms Power of Fasting Diets for Weight Loss

    TUESDAY, Dec. 21, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Intermittent fasting is all the rage due to its potential health benefits, and now a new review shows this style of eating really does produce weight loss and may even improve certain markers of heart health.

  • Denise Mann HealthDay Reporter
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  • December 21, 2021
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  • Almost 1 in Every 3 College-Age Americans Are Now Obese

    It's probably fair to say that most people know of the so-called "Freshman 15" — the weight that college students are often said to gain when they're away from home for the first time.

    But in recent decades, matters have gotten much worse in the United States. A new study using national data for people aged 18 to 25 found that while the prevalence of obesity was just over 6% in 1976 to ...

    Could 'Brown Fat' Make Some Obese People Healthier?

    All body fat is not the same.

    And a new study suggests that folks who have more of what's known as brown fat may have a lower risk of weight-related health problems, such as diabetes and high blood pressure.

    "Brown fat has long been thought to benefit metabolism because, unlike the much more common white storage...

    Strength Training Is No Slouch for Shedding Pounds

    Strength training can help you lose weight, Australian researchers report.

    Their new study reports you can lose a percentage of body fat through strength training alone that is similar to weight loss through cardio or aerobics.

    "A lot of people think that if you want to lose weight, you need to go out and run," said researcher Mandy Hagstrom, an exercise physiologist and senior lect...

    Weight Loss in Childhood May Protect Boys Against Future Infertility

    Obese boys who lose weight may avoid fertility problems in adulthood, a preliminary study suggests.

    Even short-term weight loss might partially reverse weight-related alterations in reproductive function, the researchers said.

    Childhood obesity can have serious effects on adulthood health, including a risk of cancer, heart disease and type 2 diabetes. Obesity has also been linked to...

    In 16 States, 35% or More Residents Now Obese: CDC

    America's waistline keeps widening.

    On Wednesday, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced that 16 states now have at least 35% of their residents who are obese, a number that's nearly doubled since 2018.

    The CDC's 2020 Adult Obesity Prevalence Maps now show that Delaware, Iowa, Ohio and Texas have joined Alabama, Arkansas, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, ...

    One Key Factor Drives Weight Gain in College

    College students often put on weight during their freshman year, and a lack of structured exercise may be largely to blame, a new study suggests.

    Weight gain is so common among first-year college students that it has spawned the phrase "the freshman 15" -- though that figure is something of a myth.

    More often, studies have found, college freshmen gain about 8 pounds over the academi...

    Kids Piled on Extra Pounds During Pandemic

    New research confirms the pandemic has not been good for the waistlines of children.

    During lockdowns, American kids gained more weight than before the pandemic, and the number who became obese also increased, researchers report.

    "This increased weight gain occurred in all youth between 5 and 17 years, but was particularly evident in children ages 5 to 11 -- an excess weight gain of...

    Expert Panel Lowers Routine Screening Age for Diabetes to 35

    The recommended age to start screening overweight and obese people for diabetes will be lowered by five years from 40 to 35, the nation's leading panel of preventive health experts has announced.

    The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) has decided an earlier five years of testing could help detect more people who have prediabetes, said Dr. Michael Barry, vice chair of the USPSTF....

    Dangerous Diabetes Tied to Pregnancy Is on the Rise

    Growing numbers of pregnant women are developing gestational diabetes, putting them and their babies at risk for complications later on.

    Gestational diabetes is a type of diabetes that develops during pregnancy in women who weren't already diabetic.

    Between 2011 and 2019, rates of gestational diabetes in the United States jumped 30%, according to a large nationwide study of first-ti...

    Stronger Hearts, Better Outcomes in Pregnancy: Study

    Thinking of starting a family? Start getting your heart in shape. New research suggests that how healthy a woman's heart is before conception affects outcomes in her pregnancy.

    Study author Dr. Sadiya Khan said the findings make a case for more comprehensive heart assessments prior to pregnancy rather than focusing on isolated individual risk factors, such as high blood pressure ("hyperte...

    No Good Evidence Weight Loss Supplements Work: Study

    Losing weight is hard, but many weight loss supplements promise to make the journey easy. Unfortunately, there's little high-quality research to back these claims, a new study shows.

    Hundreds of weight loss supplements like green tea extract, chitosan, guar gum and conjugated linoleic acid are being hawked by aggressive marketers. And an estimated 34% of Americans who want to lose weight ...

    Dirty Air in Pregnancy Might Raise Baby's Obesity Risk

    Children may have an increased risk of obesity if their mothers were exposed to high levels of air pollution during pregnancy, researchers say.

    In a new study, 123 Hispanic mother-infant pairs were enrolled in an ongoing trial in the Los Angeles region. Before pregnancy, about one-third of the mothers were normal weight, one-third were overweight and one-third were obese.

    The resear...

    Teasing People About Weight Can Help Bring on Eating Disorders

    What can make a young person vulnerable to eating disorders? Teasing them about any extra pounds they may carry, researchers say.

    "Our findings add to the growing evidence that weight-based mistreatment is not helpful and is often harmful to the health of young people," said study leader Laura Hooper, a PhD student at the University of Minnesota's School of Public Health, in Minneapolis.<...

    Your Teen's Smartphone Could Be Key to Unhealthy Weight

    Your teens' route to a healthy or unhealthy weight may be in their hands -- literally.

    New research out of South Korea shows that teens who spend too much time on their smartphones are also more prone to eating habits that increase their odds for obesity.

    One nutritionist who helps treat obesity in the young wasn't surprised by the findings.

    "Spending hours on end on your phon...

    Tai Chi Equal to 'Regular' Exercise in Trimming Your Tummy

    Could exercise that uses slow movements and breathing, like tai chi, do as much for trimming belly fat in older adults as aerobic exercise?

    It might. A new study found that individuals aged 50 and up who practiced tai chi for 12 weeks lost about as much waist circumference as older adults who did conventional exercise (such as aerobics and strength training).

    Though tai chi is consi...

    Lost Weight? One Factor Can Keep It From Returning

    Losing weight is hard, and keeping it off can be even harder. Now, a new study suggests that sitting less might make all the difference.

    People who maintained their weight loss spent about three hours less each day sitting than did folks who were obese and stayed that way.

    "That's a quite a difference," said study author Suzanne Phelan, a professor of kinesiology and public health ...

    'Yo-Yo' Dieting May Mean Sleepless Nights for Women

    So-called yo-yo dieting may increase a woman's risk of insomnia, sleep apnea and other sleep problems, a new study suggests.

    Yo-yo dieting -- formally called weight cycling -- is defined as losing and regaining 10 pounds or more when not pregnant.

    The study included more than 500 women in every stage of adult life, including childbearing, premenopausal, menopausal and postmenopausal...

    Being a 'Night Owl' Raises Odds for Diabetes If You're Obese

    Though obesity by itself can drive up heart disease risk, new research suggests diabetes and heart disease risk is especially high when combined with a tendency to stay up late at night.

    The finding stems from a comparison of sleep patterns and disease in 172 middle-aged people as part of an ongoing obesity prevention study in Italy.

    "The sleep-wake cycle is one of the most importan...

    Boys Born Very Prematurely May Age Faster as Men

    Boys who weigh less than 2 pounds at birth don't age as well as their normal-weight peers, a long-term study finds.

    Canadian researchers have followed a group of extremely low birth weight (ELBW) babies and their normal-weight counterparts since 1977.

    When participants were in their early 30s, researchers compared the genes of 45 who were ELBW babies with those of 47 whose birth w...

    Weight-Loss Surgery Might Also Help Prevent Cataracts

    Weight-loss surgery can trim waistlines, and new research suggests it could also protect aging eyes.

    The study found that after bariatric (weight-loss) surgery, a person's odds for cataracts can drop significantly, especially among younger patients.

    Why might that be so? According to Swiss researchers, weight loss in obese patients may lower oxidative stress on cells, cellular ...

    In Girls as Young as 7, Weight May Predict Odds for Eating Disorder

    Could there be a way to tell years in advance which girls are more likely to develop eating disorders?

    New research from Denmark suggests that childhood body mass index (BMI) may offer important clues. BMI is an estimate of body fat based on height and weight.

    The new research linked lower BMI as early as age 7 with a higher risk of anorexia, an eating disorder in which people sever...

    Obesity More Deadly for Men Than Women When COVID Strikes

    It's long been known that obesity is a risk factor for severe COVID-19 in infected people. But new research suggests that the connection may be even stronger for men than women.

    Researchers at Montefiore Medical Center in New York City analyzed data from more than 3,500 COVID-19 patients admitted to the hospital between early March and May 1, 2020.

    Both moderate (a body mass index ...

    Drug Saxenda Aids Weight Loss -- But You Should Exercise, Too

    The weight-loss drug Saxenda can keep extra pounds off -- but combining it with exercise brings a bigger payoff, a new clinical trial finds.

    The study found that some longstanding advice is valid: Prescription weight-loss drugs work best when used along with -- and not in place of -- lifestyle changes.

    Saxenda (liraglutide) is a prescription drug approved in the United States for sp...

    These Factors Could Lead to a Real Pain in the Neck

    Neck pain? Poor posture can cause it, but may not be the only reason why, new research suggests.

    Lifestyle is a key culprit -- particularly long periods of time spent hunched over handheld devices or working on computers. So a team at Texas A&M University set out to learn just how big a part personal factors play in neck pain.

    The researchers conducted a series of experiments in whi...

    What's for Lunch? Often, It's What Your Co-Workers Are Having

    Everyone has probably heard the expression "you are what you eat," but do you eat what you want, or do you follow the crowd?

    New research suggests that what people have at lunch is influenced by the friends or coworkers who they are dining with. And this is true whether they're making healthy choices or unhealthy ones.

    "We found that individuals tend to mirror the food choices of ot...

    You Don't Have to Be Obese for Belly Fat to Harm You, Heart Experts Warn

    Extra padding around the belly can spell trouble for the heart, even if you're not technically overweight.

    That's among the conclusions of a new scientific statement from the American Heart Association (AHA), where experts lay out the heart risks of being "apple-shaped."

    It encourages doctors to dust off those old-fashioned tape measures and make waist circumference part of patients...

    In Breast Cancer Survivors, Obesity Raises Odds for Cancer's Return

    Most people know obesity can lead to diabetes or heart disease, but excess weight can play a role in cancer, too, researchers say.

    A new study found that breast cancer survivors who are overweight have a statistically significant increased risk of developing a second primary cancer - one not connected to their previous cancer.

    The risk likely owes to shared risk factors between the ...

    Americans Are Eating Less Healthily Everywhere, Except at School

    Taking a deep dive into how Americans eat, a new dietary analysis finds that no matter where people get their food, bad nutrition rules the day, with one key exception: schools.

    The conclusion is based on surveys conducted among 61,000 adults and children between 2003 and 2018. Respondents' answers revealed that the quality of much of the food they've been getting from restaurants, grocer...

    Obesity Tied to Shorter Survival in Cancer Patients

    Obesity may shorten the lives of patients with certain types of cancers, but not others, a new research review concludes.

    The analysis, of more than 200 studies, found that across numerous cancers, obesity was linked to shorter survival. The list included breast, colon, prostate, uterine and pancreatic cancers.

    On the other hand, patients with lung, kidney or melanoma skin cancer al...

    Will High-Protein Diets Help the Middle-Aged Build Muscle?

    Middle-aged adults looking to boost their muscle mass do not need to bulk up on protein, a new study suggests.

    Researchers found that 10 weeks of strength training plus a moderate amount of protein were enough to build muscle in previously sedentary middle-aged people. And extra protein brought no added gains.

    The findings run counter to a common belief among exercisers, said resear...

    Pandemic Has Many Kids Struggling With Weight Issues

    Kids and teens are already struggling to learn outside the classroom during the pandemic, but lockdowns and quarantines are also making it hard for them to control their weight, child health experts say.

    Lost routines, economic insecurity and grief are making things more challenging for children who struggle with their weight, whether it's with obesity or anorexia, according to doctors at...

    Black Women More Prone to Postmenopausal Weight Gain Than White Women

    Black American women are more likely to gain weight after menopause than white women, and a number of factors may underlie the difference, researchers say.

    They analyzed data from nearly 71,000 American women who had gone through menopause and were enrolled in a long-term health study.

    The analysis found that Black women were more than 50% more likely to have a weight gain of 10% af...

    'Slow Walkers' at Higher Odds for Severe COVID-19

    If you saunter and shuffle instead of scurry when you walk, you are at higher risk of severe illness and death from COVID-19, British researchers warn.

    For the study, the investigators analyzed data from more than 412,000 middle-aged Britons and found that among those whose weight was normal, slow walkers were more than twice as likely to develop severe COVID-19 and 3.75 times more likely...

    Certain HIV Meds Have Patients Packing on Pounds

    A commonly prescribed component of the life-saving antiretroviral drug cocktails used to treat HIV may trigger weight gain, new research warns.

    The concern stems from tracking patients taking antiretroviral therapy (ART). Since the mid-1990s, the therapy has relied on various drug combinations to essentially outwit HIV, controlling viral loads and turning a once-deadly infection into a ma...

    Obesity a Big Risk Factor for Severe COVID-19, Study Confirms

    Yet another study confirms what doctors have long known: Being obese greatly raises the odds that if you contract COVID-19, your case could be a severe one.

    The study, from researchers at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, supports calls for obese Americans to move to the head of the line for protective vaccines.

    "These findings highlight clinical and public health...

    Fertility Treatments Might Affect Kids' Growth, But Not for Long

    The growth patterns of kids born through fertility treatment differ initially from those conceived naturally, but those growth rates do catch up over time, a new study finds.

    In-vitro fertilization and other forms of "assisted reproductive technology" (ART) has long been associated with lower birth weights in babies, but it wasn't clear how long differences in growth continue.

    To fi...

    Injected Drug Delivers Up to 20% Weight Loss in Trial

    A new weight-loss drug is almost twice as effective as current medications, clinical trial results show, and experts say it could revolutionize the treatment of obesity.

    Overweight and obese people lost an average 15% of their body weight using a weekly injectable 2.4 milligram dose of semaglutide (Ozempic), a new report reveals.

    What's more, one-third of all participants lost 20% o...

    Calorie-Burning 'Brown Fat' Could Help Keep You Healthy, Even if You're Obese

    A special calorie-burning type of body fat appears to help protect against an array of chronic ailments, including heart disease, type 2 diabetes and high blood pressure, a new study suggests.

    Brown fat generates heat by drawing glucose from the bloodstream, as opposed to energy-storing white fat, explained senior researcher Dr. Paul Cohen. He's an assistant professor and senior attending...

    'Body Issues' Raise Depression Risks for Teens

    Body dissatisfaction significantly increases teens' risk of depression, researchers say.

    The degree of heightened risk ranged from 50% to 285%, according to the report published online Dec. 8 in the Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health.

    "These findings demonstrate that body dissatisfaction should be considered as a public health issue of pressing concern," concluded a...

    Vegan Diets Tied to Higher Bone Fracture Risk

    Chew on this: Vegans face a 43% higher risk for bone fractures than meat eaters, a large British study warns.

    The rise in risk was not confined to vegans, who eat no meat, fish, dairy or eggs. The researchers also identified a notably higher risk for hip fractures among those who eat fish but no meat (pescatarians), and among vegetarians who swear off both meat and fish, but do consume da...

    Big Babies May Face Higher Lifelong A-Fib Risk

    Parents are usually pleased when their newborn seems big and strong, but new research suggests that large babies may be at higher risk for the heart rhythm disorder atrial fibrillation later in life.

    Atrial fibrillation (a-fib) is the most common heart rhythm disorder, affecting more than 40 million people worldwide. People with a-fib have a five times increased risk of stroke.

    ...

    AHA News: Belly Fat May Signal Early Heart Issues for Mexican Americans

    Among Mexican Americans, too much abdominal fat predicts the beginning of a buildup of plaque in the arteries called atherosclerosis – an early indication of heart disease. But new research shows this is only true for those who were born in the United States.

    "From a clinical perspective, this suggests we should probably be targeting second- or higher-generation Hispanics with pub...

    Weight-Loss Surgery May Cut Pancreatic Cancer Risk in People With Diabetes

    Weight-loss surgery significantly reduces the risk of pancreatic cancer in obese people with diabetes, a new study finds.

    For the study, the researchers analyzed 20 years of data from 1.4 million people, including more than 10,000 who'd had weight-loss surgery. About three-quarters of those who had weight-loss surgery were women.

    People who'd had weight-loss surgery were les...

    Pancreas Size, Shape Can Return to Normal in Diabetes Remission: Study

    Reversing type 2 diabetes can restore the pancreas to its normal size and shape, a new study finds.

    Previous research found that with remission of type 2 diabetes through significant weight loss, natural insulin-production can return to levels similar to people who have never had diabetes.

    The new study is the first to show that reversing diabetes can also affect the size an...

    Do Fatter Legs Mean Lower Blood Pressure?

    People with fatter legs appear less likely to have high blood pressure, new research suggests.

    The researchers suspect that measuring leg fat could help guide blood pressure prevention efforts. Those with bigger legs may not need to worry as much about high blood pressure -- a contributor to heart attack and stroke.

    "Distribution of fat matters. Even though we think that f...

    Eating in the Evening Could Be Bad for Your Health

    To get a handle on your eating habits, keep a close eye on the clock, researchers suggest.

    Consuming most of your daily calories in the evening is associated with a less nutritious diet and higher calorie intake, a new study shows.

    Unfortunately, hunger pangs are often strongest later in the day. And this pattern could influence both the type and amount of food we eat, the s...

    How to Keep Your Kids Trim Through Quarantine

    A lot of kids have been pushing up the scale numbers while home during the pandemic -- and parents need to take steps to prevent the dreaded "quarantine 15," an expert says.

    "During the school year, most parents rely on schools to provide their child with regular exercise," said Dr. Joyce Samuel, an associate professor of pediatrics at McGovern Medical School at the University of Texa...

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