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13 Aug

Your Metabolism Changes as You Age, Just Not When You Think

Your calorie-burning power is not tied to lifetime milestones like puberty and menopause, researchers say.

Health News Results - 360

Cleaner Air Could Mean Healthier Brains for Older Women

Everyone knows cleaner air means healthier bodies, but new research suggests it might also help aging minds.

"Our study is important because it is one of the first to show that reducing air pollution over time may benefit the brain health of older women by decreasing their likelihood of developing dementia," said...

Four Factors in Midlife Predict a Healthy Old Age for Women

Examining a woman's health in midlife can predict her health decades later, researchers say.

Four specific factors — higher body mass index (BMI), smoking, arthritis and depressive symptoms — at age 55 are associated with clinically important declines in physical health 10 years later, a new study reports.

"Age 55 to 65 may be a critical decade," said study co-author Dr. Daniel ...

Scientists Work Out How Exercise Saves Your Brain

Exercise helps you stay fit, hale and hearty, and researchers say it may also help you stave off dementia and Alzheimer's disease. Now they have a better understanding of the hidden benefits that aid the brain.

Older folks who are more physically active have higher levels of a protein that promotes better communication between the brain's synapses, a new study reports.

"Synapses are...

Quality of Home Health Care Varies Between Urban, Rural Areas

Need in-home health care? Know this: The quality of your care may depend on where you live.

That's the takeaway from a new study from New York University that gave agencies in urban areas high marks for keeping patients out of the hospital. It found that home health agencies in rural areas, meanwhile, get care started sooner.

“Our study highlights the persistence of disparities in...

More U.S. Seniors, Especially Women, Are Retaining Healthy Brains: Study

The percentage of older Americans reporting serious problems with memory and thinking has declined in recent years -- and higher education levels may be part of the reason, a new study finds.

Researchers found that between 2008 and 2017, the proportion of older U.S. adults reporting...

More U.S. Women Are Retaining Their Hearing as They Age

Hearing loss can happen with advancing age, but fewer American women appear to be affected now than in the past.

Researchers who studied hearing loss between 2008 and 2017 found in the earliest of those years, 16.3% of older U.S. adults reported serious hearing loss. But by 2017 that had ...

Who's Dying Young in U.S. From Heart Attacks?

Fewer Americans are dying prematurely from heart attack compared with years ago, but progress has stalled out in the past decade, new research shows.

For the study, the researchers examined 20 years of data on heart attack deaths among Americans under 65 — deaths that are considered "premature."

The bigger picture looked good: Between 1999 and 2019, those deaths declined by 52%.

Bladder Trouble Worsens With Age for Women, Study Confirms

A new study confirms what many older women already know: Bladder problems in women worsen with age.

The researchers found that postmenopausal women between 45 and 54 years of age are more likely to have overactive bladder syndrome, and that obesity and multiple ...

Over 60? You Have Billions of Potentially Cancer-Causing Cells

Have you just turned 60 and feel like you're in great health?

Well, new research suggests that unseen dangers lurk: Scientists found that cancer-free people older than 60 have at least 100 billion cells with at least one cancer-associated mutation.

But there's good news, too: The vast majority of these mutations won't do anything and most people (60%) will go their entire lives wit...

Global Rate of Stroke Cases, Deaths Still Too High

While strokes and related deaths have declined in rich nations, they remain stubbornly high worldwide, a new study says.

Author Liyuan Han attributed the overall decreases to "better medical services in high-income countries, which may offer earlier detection of stroke risk factors and better control" of them.

“But even in these countries, the total number of people with

  • Robert Preidt
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  • December 16, 2021
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  • Overactive Bladder, Dangerous Falls Often Go Together for Seniors

    An overactive bladder isn't just a nuisance and a source of embarrassment. For the elderly, it can also trigger a potentially fatal fall, a Canadian study says.

    Falls are the leading ca...

    Smog Could Reduce Exercise's Benefit to Your Brain

    Dirty air could cancel out some of the brain benefits of exercise, a new study suggests.

    "Physical activity is associated with improved markers of brain health in areas with lower air pollution," said study author Melissa Furlong. "However, some beneficial effects essentially disappeared for vigorous physical activity in areas with the highest levels of air pollution." Furlong is an envi...

    Gastro Symptoms of Menopause May Vary by Race

    When a woman's periods begin to slow down and finally stop, digestive problems often pick up -- and new research suggests race and ethnicity play a role.

    With menopause, levels of estrogen decrease, while cortisol levels increase, triggering an adrenaline boost that changes digestive function. It can set off symptoms such as bloating, nausea, diarrhea, constipation, abdominal pain, indige...

    Cataract Surgery Might Lower Your Odds for Dementia

    People who undergo surgery to treat cataracts may have a lower likelihood of developing Alzheimer's disease, a new study suggests.

    Of more than 3,000 older adults with the eye disease, those who had surgery were about 30% less likely to be diagnosed with Alzheimer's in the coming years, researchers found.

  • Amy Norton HealthDay Reporter
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  • December 7, 2021
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  • Lifetime Spent With Epilepsy Ages the Brain, Study Finds

    People with a longtime history of epilepsy show signs of rapid brain aging that may raise their odds for developing dementia down the road.

    This is the key finding of new research reporting that the brains of people with epilepsy that began in childhood appear to be about 10 years older than the brains of people without a history of this seizure disorder.

    Individuals with epilepsy w...

    Clearing Out Clutter Might Not Help People With Dementia

    You might think de-cluttering would make it easier for people with dementia to do daily tasks. Not so, says a new study from the United Kingdom.

    "It is generally assumed that a person with dementia will be better able to carry out daily tasks when their home space is tidy and clutter-free," said Eneida Mioshi, a professor in the School of Health Sciences at University of East Anglia (UEA)...

    Black Americans Less Likely to Lose Hearing as They Age

    Older Black Americans are much more likely to have good hearing than white Americans, and the difference is especially notable among men, a new study shows.

    “We found that among males, non-Hispanic Black Americans have a prevalence of hearing loss that is similar to non-Hispanic white Americans who are 10 years younger,” co-author ZhiDi Deng, a pharmacy student at the University of To...

    'Mild Cognitive Impairment' in Older Age Often Disappears, Study Finds

    A diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) might worry an older adult, who could see it as a stepping stone to dementia. But a new study suggests one does not necessarily lead to the other.

    In fact, nearly half of seniors tracked in the study -- all of who had been diagnosed with issues in memory and thinking and received an MCI diagnosis -- no longer had the condition a few years lat...

    Red Light in Morning May Protect Fading Eyesight: Study

    A weekly dose of deep red light in the morning may protect fading eyesight as people age, U.K. researchers say.

    "Using a simple LED device once a week recharges the energy system that has declined in the retina cells, rather like recharging a battery," according to Glen Jeffery, lead author of a small, new study.

    In previous work, the researchers found that daily three-minute exposu...

    Housework Might Boost Your Body & Mind

    Seniors, looking for a way to stay mentally quick and physically strong? Start scrubbing.

    Researchers from Singapore say housework may be a key to keeping your brain sharp as you age.

    Their new study found that in older adults, cleaning house was tied to a better memory and attention span, a...

    'Active Grandparent': Humans Evolved to Exercise in Old Age

    Becoming a couch potato as you get older goes against evolution and puts your health at risk, a new study suggests.

    Humans have evolved to be active in their later years, and staying active can protect against heart disease and a number of other serious health problems, according to researchers at Harvard.

    "It's a widespread idea in Western societies that as we get older, it's norma...

    Almost 1 in Every 3 College-Age Americans Are Now Obese

    It's probably fair to say that most people know of the so-called "Freshman 15" — the weight that college students are often said to gain when they're away from home for the first time.

    But in recent decades, matters have gotten much worse in the United States. A new study using national data for people aged 18 to 25 found that while the prevalence of obesity was just over 6% in 1976 to ...

    Demand for Liver Transplant Rises Sharply Among Older Americans

    More older folks are winding up on liver transplant waiting lists than ever before, as obesity and alcoholism supersede hepatitis C as the main cause of liver failure in the United States.

    The percentage of liver transplant candidates aged 65 or older rose from 9% in the early 2000s to 23% by 2020, researchers found. Most seniors' liver failure is due to fatty liver disease, in which exce...

    Alzheimer's Diagnosis May Come With Big Cost to Social Life

    Alzheimer's is a devastating disease, slowly robbing patients of their memories and even their sense of selves.

    Now, new research shows it also robs sufferers of a healthy social life.

    "Social relationships are an essential feature of our quality of life and can buffer against cognitive decline," said study co-author Addam Reynolds, a doctoral candidate at the Rutgers School of Soci...

    Study Links Muscle Mass to Severity of Hot Flashes in Women

    Older women with muscle loss are less likely to have menopause-related hot flashes, a new study finds.

    The loss of muscle mass and function (sarcopenia) is one of the most significant changes that occurs with age, and older women are at increased risk due to sex hormone changes after menopause.

    Other risk factors for sarcopenia include inactivity, lower protein intake, changes in gr...

    Many People May Be Eating Their Way to Dementia

    Eating lots of fruits, veggies, beans and other foods with inflammation-cooling properties may lower your odds of developing dementia as you age.

    But, if your diet is loaded with pro-inflammatory foods, you may be up to three times more likely to experience memory loss and issues with language, problem-solving and other thinking skills as you age, new research suggests.

    "A less infl...

    U.S. Sees Decline in Sepsis Deaths, But Some Americans More Vulnerable

    While deaths from sepsis have dropped in the United States since 2000, older Americans remain particularly susceptible to the life-threatening bacterial infection, new government data shows.

    Sepsis strikes roughly 2 million people each year and is the cause of one in three hospital deaths in the United States, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

    "S...

    Could Estrogen Help Shield Women's Brains From Alzheimer's?

    A key to reduced Alzheimer's disease risk in women could be how much of the hormone estrogen they're able to stockpile over the years, new research suggests.

    Certain lifetime choices — such as having more children, taking hormonal birth control or taking hormone therapy during menopause — mean that a woman has greater cumulative exposure to estrogen during her lifetime. A longer ...

    Nearly 3 in 10 U.S. Adults Say They Have a Disability

    A growing number of American adults say they have a physical or mental disability, a new study finds.

    Of more than 400,000 adults who responded to a 2019 U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention survey, 27% reported a disability. That's a 1% increase since 2016, and represents about 67 million Americans, according to researchers at Johns Hopkins University who analyzed the data.

    Could Breastfeeding Help Women Keep Their Smarts as They Age?

    Might breastfeeding affect a new mother's future brain health?

    That's the intriguing question posed by a new study that flips the narrative from the often-touted benefits for baby to what impact breastfeeding might hold for Mom years later.

    Researchers from UCLA Health found that women over age 50 who had breastfed their babies performed better on tests of brain function than those ...

    Bald Truth: Mouse Study May Get at Roots of Hair Loss

    New research in mice may provide clues to age-related hair loss in men and women.

    Scientists found that as hair stem cells in mice age, they lose the stickiness that keeps them secured inside the hair follicle. This allows the stem cells to drift away from the follicle.

    "The result is fewer and fewer stem cells in the hair follicle to produce hair," said study lead author Rui Yi, a ...

    Vision Troubles Could Raise Midlife Depression Risk for Women

    Midlife vision problems could increase women's risk of depression, new research suggests.

    Rates of eye problems and depression rise during midlife, but knowledge about how vision affects depression at that time has been limited. The new study identified a significant link between impaired vision and development of depression.

    "Given that the combination of visual impairment and depr...

    Right Amount of Sleep May Be Important in Early Alzheimer's

    Getting the right amount of sleep — not too much and not too little — could reduce your risk of mental decline as you age, even if you have early Alzheimer's disease, a new study claims.

    Poor sleep and Alzheimer's disease are both associated with thinking ("cognitive") declines, but separating out the effects of each has been a challenge.

    This new study included 100 older adults...

    Laser Therapy Promises to 'Rejuvenate' Vaginal Tissue. A New Study Finds Otherwise

    Laser-based vaginal "rejuvenation" is all the rage among women concerned about vaginal dryness and other "down there" symptoms of menopause, but it's buyer beware when it comes to these procedures, new research warns.

    It turns out that laser-based vaginal rejuvenation may not be any better than placebo (dummy) treatment when it comes to relieving vaginal dryness, itching, burning, irritat...

    More Middle-Aged, Older Women Getting 'Broken Heart' Syndrome

    The number of Americans diagnosed with "broken heart" syndrome has steadily risen in the past 15 years — with the vast majority being women, a new study finds.

    The condition, which doctors call stress cardiomyopathy, appears similar to a heart attack — with symptoms such as chest pain and breathlessness. But its cause is entirely different: Experts believe it reflects a temporary weak...

    Survey Finds Who's Most Likely to Give to Charity and How

    Older adults are more likely than younger ones to give to charity, but are more likely to support ones in their own country, an international study reveals.

    "As countries, including the U.K., are announcing cuts to foreign aid budgets, there will be an increasing reliance on global charities," said senior author Patricia Lockwood, of the Center for Human Brain Health at the University of ...

    Many Older Americans Who Should Be Checking Blood Pressure at Home Aren't: Poll

    If you are over 50 and you have high blood pressure or a health condition for which blood pressure control is essential, at-home blood pressure checks can avert medical emergencies.

    The trouble is that too few of these people actually perform them, a new survey reveals.

    "This poll shows that we have more work to do to encourage older adults with certain chronic health conditions to ...

    As You Age, Your 'Microbiome' Changes

    The key to eternal youth may lie in our guts.

    Advancing age seems to change the makeup of the microbiome in the small intestine, and in the future, it may be possible to tweak this bacterial milieu and boost longevity, new research suggests.

    The gut microbiome is made up of trillions of microorganisms and their genetic material. The diversity of these organisms is believed to play a...

    Depression in Early Life May Up Dementia Risk Later

    Happy young adults may be somewhat protected from dementia, but the reverse may be true, too: If you're a depressed young adult, your odds for dementia rise, a new study suggests.

    "Generally, we found that the greater the depressive symptoms, the lower the cognition and the faster the rates of decline," researcher Wil...

    Peripheral Artery Disease: Common, and Here's How to Spot It

    If you're older and your legs ache, it could be nothing -- or it could be a sign of peripheral artery disease (PAD).

    Have you ever even heard of it? Maybe not. That's why the Society for Vascular Surgery would like you to know a little more.

    "As we age, we are susceptible to some aches and pains, possibly a tightness in the lower back after standing for long periods of time or a sor...

    Retired and Want to Stay Sharp? Hop on the Internet More Often

    Help in retaining mental function when you age could be only a few keystrokes away.

    While crosswords and exercise are often touted as ways to retain thinking skills, U.K. investigators found that the internet may also help seniors stay sharp in retirement.

    Those who used the internet more after their careers ended had substantially higher scores on cognitive, or thinking, tests, acc...

    AHA News: A Year of Committed Exercise in Middle Age Reversed Worrisome Heart Stiffness

    A year of exercise training helped to preserve or increase the youthful elasticity of the heart muscle among people showing early signs of heart failure, a small study shows.

    The new research, published Sept. 20 in the American Heart Association journal Circulation, bolsters the idea that "exercise is medicine," an important shift in approach, the researchers wrote.

    The stu...

    Turning 65 Brings Big Health Care Cost Savings, Study Finds

    When Americans are eligible for Medicare at age 65, they see a significant drop in their out-of-pocket medical costs.

    Lowering the eligibility age would save even more, especially for people with the highest out-of-pocket costs, according to a new study.

    "Me...

    Diets That Lower Brain Iron Could Keep You Sharp

    Older adults who regularly eat foods like fish, nuts and olive oil may have less iron accumulation in their brains, as well as sharper memories, a small study suggests.

    The brain requires a certain level of iron to function normally, but the aging brain can accumulate an excess amount. And that excess iron has been linked to cognitive decline — a slow deterioration in memory and thinkin...

    Health Savings Accounts Used Least by People Who Need Them Most: Poll

    Tax-free health savings accounts can make it easier for Americans to pay for future health expenses, but most older adults aren't using them.

    A new poll by Michigan Medicine-University of Michigan found that while nearly 1 in 5 people weren't confident that they could afford their health costs, only about 12% of people had a flexible spending account (FSA). And just 45% of people who qual...

    Could Traffic Noise Raise Your Odds for Dementia?

    It's more than just an annoyance: Long-term exposure to traffic and train noise may increase the risk of dementia and Alzheimer's disease, Danish researchers report.

    The study authors said that more than 1,200 of Denmark's nearly 8,500 cases of dementia in 2017 may have resulted from exposure to noise, which means that reducing traffic noise might help prevent the thinking, memory and beh...

    Postponing Retirement Might Help Keep Dementia at Bay

    Early retirement may sound appealing, but a recent study hints that putting it off a few years might help older adults retain more of their mental sharpness.

    Using data on more than 20,000 older Americans, researchers estimated that if all of those people waited until age 67 to retire, their collective cognitive health would benefit.

    "Cognition" refers to a person's ability to think...

    Why Water Is Key to Your Heart's Health

    Everyone knows that drinking plenty of water every day can improve your health in a myriad of ways, but here's a lesser-known benefit: New research suggests that middle-aged adults can lower their long-term risk for heart failure by simply drinking enough water on a daily basis.

    The finding follows an analysis that stacked heart health up against blood salt levels -- an indicator for over...

    Age Can Impair a Man's Odds for Fatherhood: Study

    It's no surprise to hear that women's fertility wanes as their biological clock ticks away.

    But do men have a biological clock, too?

    New research shows it's not exactly the same, but their likelihood of fathering a child does appear to decline, even with assisted reproductive technology, once they're past age 50.

    Research completed among potential fathers both above and...

    A Mentally Challenging Job Could Help Ward Off Dementia

    While every worker would prefer a fun, mentally stimulating job, new research reveals an added bonus: Such work could help prevent dementia in old age.

    On-the-job intellectual stimulation appears to lower levels of certain proteins that block brain cells from forming new connections -- and doing so could help prevent or postpone dementia, the study's authors said.

    "This is an import...

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