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06 Jan

Having an Unhealthy Heart in Midlife Is a Big Threat to Women’s Brains, Study Finds

Heart disease and cardiac risk factors appear to hurt women’s brains more than men’s, researchers say.

29 Oct

Magnetic Brain Stimulation Eases Most Cases of Severe Depression: New Study

Nearly 80% of patients with severe depression achieved remission after being treated with a new type of brain stimulation, researchers say.

27 Jul

Improved Air Quality Boosts Brain Health and Cuts Dementia Risk

Reducing air pollution can significantly lower the risk of dementia and Alzheimer's disease, according to several new studies.

Health News Results - 489

Cleaner Air Could Mean Healthier Brains for Older Women

Everyone knows cleaner air means healthier bodies, but new research suggests it might also help aging minds.

"Our study is important because it is one of the first to show that reducing air pollution over time may benefit the brain health of older women by decreasing their likelihood of developing dementia," said...

Even a Little Exercise May Help Slow Parkinson's

A few hours of exercise a week may help slow Parkinson's disease, even if it's just moderate activity such as walking or gardening, a new study suggests.

The key is to be consistent, the researchers found.

"Although medications can provide people with Parkinson's some symptom relief, they haven't been shown to slow the progression of the disease," said study author Dr. Kazuto Tsukit...

Medicare Proposes to Only Cover Alzheimer's Drug Aduhelm for Use in Clinical Trials

It's a move that could severely limit the number of people taking the controversial new Alzheimer's drug Aduhelm: Medicare on Tuesday proposed to only cover the cost of the pricey medication for people enrolled in approved clinical trials.

A final decision on coverage is expected later this year.

The drug costs $28,200 per year, but that cost will only be covered for participan...

Scientists Work Out How Exercise Saves Your Brain

Exercise helps you stay fit, hale and hearty, and researchers say it may also help you stave off dementia and Alzheimer's disease. Now they have a better understanding of the hidden benefits that aid the brain.

Older folks who are more physically active have higher levels of a protein that promotes better communication between the brain's synapses, a new study reports.

"Synapses are...

Aduhelm: Will Medicare Cover the Controversial Alzheimer's Drug?

Following a months-long and unprecedented review, Medicare officials expect to announce within the next couple of weeks whether the program will cover the controversial Alzheimer's drug Aduhelm. The drug's benefits are in question and its annual price tag tops $28,000.

The U.S. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) tend to cover with little fanfare most drugs approved by its s...

Drug Might Help Ease 'Sensory Demands' of Autism

A medication that acts on certain brain receptors can temporarily ease visual-processing problems in some adults with autism, a small study has found.

Researchers said it's far too early to know whether the drug, arbaclofen, could prove useful in managing those visual issues. But the findings do give in...

Parlez-vous 'Woof'? Dogs May Distinguish Between Different Human Languages

Dogs don't speak a human language, but they do know when you switch from one tongue to another, an intriguing new study finds.

“We know that people, even preverbal human infants, notice the difference," said study co-author Laura Cuaya of Eötvös Loránd University in Budapest, Hungary.

But, she wondered after taking her dog Kun-Kun from Mexico to Hungary for her postdoctoral st...

Study Finds No Ties Between Youth Tackle Football, Brain/Behavioral Issues

Many parents struggle with the decision to let their kids play tackle football or other contact sports due to the risk of concussions and long-term brain diseases that may occur with repeated head blows.

Now, new...

Make 2022 Your Year for a Free Memory Screening

When it comes to routine health screenings, resolve to include a memory assessment in 2022.

The Alzheimer’s Foundation of America offers routine screenings that are both virtual and free every Monday, Wednesday and Friday.

The process is quick, taking about 10 to 15 minutes. It includes a series of questions meant to gauge memory, language, thinking skills and other intellectual ...

Could the 'Alzheimer's Gene' Raise Risks for Severe COVID-19?

A certain gene mutation known as APOE4 has long been known to raise the risk for Alzheimer’s disease.

Now, researchers report it may also predispose people to increased susceptibility to COVID-19 infection and severe symptoms, including small brain bleeds.

Researchers in Finland, where abou...

More U.S. Seniors, Especially Women, Are Retaining Healthy Brains: Study

The percentage of older Americans reporting serious problems with memory and thinking has declined in recent years -- and higher education levels may be part of the reason, a new study finds.

Researchers found that between 2008 and 2017, the proportion of older U.S. adults reporting...

Scientists Find Clue to Links Between Autism, Epilepsy

Kids with autism have low levels of a protein that quiets overactive brain cells, which may explain why so many have epilepsy, according to a new study.

Because the protein can be detected in cerebrospinal fluid, it may have promise as a marker to diagnose autism and as a potential treatment target for the epilepsy tha...

NFL Players Face 4 Times the Odds of ALS

NFL players are four times more likely to die of Lou Gehrig's disease (ALS) than other people, new research finds, adding to known links between football-related head injuries and brain diseases, including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE).

And the longer they played football, the greater their risk, the new study found.

ALS, or

  • Denise Mann HealthDay Reporter
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  • December 16, 2021
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  • Full Page
  • Are Rocket Scientists, Brain Surgeons Really Smarter Than Other Folks?

    "It's not rocket science," "It's not brain surgery" -- but just how smart are rocket scientists and brain surgeons, anyway?

    There's a good chance you're just as intelligent, a new study finds.

    This was an observational study that does not represent the worldwide range of aerospace engineers and neurosurgeons, the British researchers said. But the findings do suggest that fo...

    T-Shirt Study Shows Importance of Mom's Smell to Bond With Baby

    The sound of mom's voice can soothe a fussy baby like nothing else, but now new research suggests that an infant is also calmed by the scent of its mother.

    Prior animal studies had already shown that olfaction -- smell -- "is very important, that mother's smell is very critical for attachment," noted study author Ruth Feldman. "Young recognize mother by her smell, and mother and habitat a...

    Toxins in Wildfire Smoke May Make Their Way Into Brain

    The smoke from wildfires is dangerous for your lungs, but tiny particles from the smoke can also enter your brain and cause lifelong neurological issues, a new animal study suggests.

    Once that happens, the particles may put people at risk for everything from premature aging and various forms of dementia to depression and even psychosis, researchers say.

    "These are fires that are com...

    Smog Could Reduce Exercise's Benefit to Your Brain

    Dirty air could cancel out some of the brain benefits of exercise, a new study suggests.

    "Physical activity is associated with improved markers of brain health in areas with lower air pollution," said study author Melissa Furlong. "However, some beneficial effects essentially disappeared for vigorous physical activity in areas with the highest levels of air pollution." Furlong is an envi...

    MRI Might Spot Concussion-Linked CTE in Living Patients

    Right now, the devastating concussion-linked brain condition known as chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) can only be diagnosed after death via autopsy. But new research could help change that, allowing doctors to someday spot the illness earlier.

    According to the new study, MRI may be able to detect CTE while people are still alive.

    "While this finding is not yet ready for the ...

    Could Viagra Help Prevent Alzheimer's?

    Viagra, a drug long used to treat erectile dysfunction, may double as a potential weapon against Alzheimer's disease, a new study suggests.

    Looking at data on more than 7 million Americans, researchers found that those taking the drug were 69% less likely to develop Alzheimer's, when compared to non-users.

    Then, in lab experiments, the investigators showed that the medication seeme...

    Lifetime Spent With Epilepsy Ages the Brain, Study Finds

    People with a longtime history of epilepsy show signs of rapid brain aging that may raise their odds for developing dementia down the road.

    This is the key finding of new research reporting that the brains of people with epilepsy that began in childhood appear to be about 10 years older than the brains of people without a history of this seizure disorder.

    Individuals with epilepsy w...

    Nearly 7% of U.S. Kids Have Had a Head Injury or Concussion

    Blows to the head are common among America's kids, with close to 7% showing signs of a brain injury at some time in childhood, U.S. health officials report.

    Sports, falls and abuse are likely causes, experts say.

    Concussions and other head injuries are more common among white kids than Black or Hispanic kids. And prevalence increases with age — from 2% in children up to 5 years o...

    Could Coffee Help Lower Your Odds for Alzheimer's?

    Coffee lovers know a steaming cup of java can quickly deliver energy and mental clarity every morning, but new research suggests it may also guard against Alzheimer's disease in the long run.

    "Worldwide, a high proportion of adults drink coffee every day, making it one of the most popular beverages consumed," said lead researcher Samantha Gardener, a post-doctoral research fellow at Edith...

    More Years Playing Football, More Brain Lesions on MRI: Study

    Repetitive head hits are common in football, and they're also linked to debilitating brain injuries.

    But rendering a definitive diagnosis typically means waiting for autopsy results after the player has died.

    Now, a new study suggests that brain scans can reliably spot troubling signs of sports-inflicted neurological damage while a person is still alive.

    The research also show...

    New Insights Into What Might Drive Parkinson's Disease

    A defect in the blood-brain barrier may play a role in Parkinson's disease, a groundbreaking research study suggests.

    The blood-brain barrier acts as a filter to keep out toxins while still allowing the passage of nutrients to nourish the brain. This study found that in some people with Parkinson's, the b...

    Housework Might Boost Your Body & Mind

    Seniors, looking for a way to stay mentally quick and physically strong? Start scrubbing.

    Researchers from Singapore say housework may be a key to keeping your brain sharp as you age.

    Their new study found that in older adults, cleaning house was tied to a better memory and attention span, a...

    Brain's 'White Matter' Changes in People With Autism

    Teens and young adults with autism show marked differences in their brains' white matter compared to those without the disorder, a new study finds.

    "If you think of gray matter as the computer, white matter is like the cables," said study co-author Clara Weber, a postgraduate research fellow at Yale University School of Medicine.

    The changes are most apparent in the region involved ...

    Wearable Vibration Device May Ease Parkinson's Tremor

    Physiotherapist David Putrino was working on a vibrating glove to help deaf people experience live music when a friend mentioned that the same technology might stop tremors in people with Parkinson's disease.

    Putrino, director of rehabilitation innovation for Mount Sinai Health System in New York City, was intrigued. The friend's father had Parkinson's, so they placed the new device on hi...

    Neurologists' Group Issues Guidance to Families on Controversial Alzheimer's Drug

    Neurologists must make sure Alzheimer's patients and their families understand that the controversial drug aducanumab does not restore mental function, the American Academy of Neurology (AAN) said in new position statement that includes ethical guidelines.

    "Aducanumab is not a cure for Alzheimer's disease, yet since it has been approved by the [U.S. Food and Drug Administration], patients...

    Coming Soon: A Wearable Device to Predict Epileptic Seizures

    Claire Wiedmaier experiences epileptic seizures so bad that she's broken teeth while in their grip.

    "I have some fake teeth. I broke my two bottom front teeth," said Wiedmaier, 23, of Ankeny, Iowa, who these days can expect to have at least four seizures a month.

    Knowing when to expect a seizure would be a big help to her.

    "It would be nice to know, because then I could get so...

    Trial Begins of Nasal Vaccine for Alzheimer's Disease

    The first human clinical trial of a nasal vaccine to slow the progression of Alzheimer's disease is set to begin after nearly 20 years of research.

    This is a "remarkable milestone," according to Dr. Howard Weiner, co-director of the Ann Romney Center for Neurologic Diseases at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston.

    "Over the last two decades, we've amassed preclinical evidence sugg...

    Grandmother's Brain In Sync With Her Grandkids': Study

    Grandmothers can have a strong bond with the little children in their families — and the connection even shows up on brain scans, researchers say.

    The investigators embarked on a unique study, looking at the brains of older women — not for signs of dysfunction, as with dementia, but to study their connections with their grandchildren.

    "What really jumps out in the data is the ac...

    Pricey Alzheimer's Drug Drives Spike in Medicare B Premium: Officials

    A new and expensive Alzheimer's drug called Aduhelm is responsible for about half of the $21.60 increase in monthly premiums for Medicare's Part B outpatient program in 2022, Medicare officials report.

    The new premium will be $170.10 a month, and the $21.60 boost is the biggest increase ever in dollar amount, but not in percentage terms. As recently as August, a smaller increase of $10 fr...

    Many People May Be Eating Their Way to Dementia

    Eating lots of fruits, veggies, beans and other foods with inflammation-cooling properties may lower your odds of developing dementia as you age.

    But, if your diet is loaded with pro-inflammatory foods, you may be up to three times more likely to experience memory loss and issues with language, problem-solving and other thinking skills as you age, new research suggests.

    "A less infl...

    Vibration Therapy May Help Body, Mind in People With MS

    Multiple sclerosis patients might be able to think more clearly and move more easily if they regularly undergo whole-body vibration training, a new pilot study reports.

    A small group of MS patients who experienced vibration training showed improvements in decision making, information processing, attention and memory, according to find...

    Placebo Effect Plays Big Role in Antidepressant's Impact on Anxiety: Study

    Illustrating the power of the mind to heal itself, new research suggests that the placebo effect could help drive antidepressants' effects against anxiety disorders.

    The placebo effect refers to an increase in the success of a treatment when a patient expects a benefit.

    In the new study, patients with s...

    Could Estrogen Help Shield Women's Brains From Alzheimer's?

    A key to reduced Alzheimer's disease risk in women could be how much of the hormone estrogen they're able to stockpile over the years, new research suggests.

    Certain lifetime choices — such as having more children, taking hormonal birth control or taking hormone therapy during menopause — mean that a woman has greater cumulative exposure to estrogen during her lifetime. A longer ...

    How Bilingual Brains Shift Quickly Between Languages

    Why is it so easy for bilingual folks to switch back and forth from one language to another?

    Researchers have discovered that the brain uses a shared mechanism that makes using multiple languages completely natural.

    "Languages may differ in what sounds they use and how they organize words to form sentences," said lead study author Sarah Phillips, a doctoral student in the Neurolingu...

    Fish on Your Plate May Keep Your Brain Sharp

    Older folks who eat fish a couple of times a week may be doing their brains a favor.

    New research suggests that fish, even in moderate amounts, helps stave off vascular disease that may ultimately lead to dementia.

    "Previous studies, including work from our team in France and others in the U.S., reported protective associations of eating fish against cognitive decline and risk of de...

    Mouse Study Offers Hope for Gene Therapy Against Parkinson's Disease

    An experimental gene therapy to boost the effectiveness of the Parkinson's drug levodopa yielded promising results in mice, researchers report.

    As the loss of dopamine-releasing neurons advances in late-stage Parkinson's, levodopa is less able to ease movement problems caused by the disease, which is a progressive disorder of the nervous system.

    But a Northwestern University team fo...

    Insomnia Tied to Raised Risk of Aneurysm

    Researchers may have unearthed a surprising risk factor for often-fatal brain bleeds: Sleepless nights.

    In a study of about 70,000 adults, researchers found that people with a genetic predisposition to insomnia were at somewhat higher risk of a brain aneurysm. An aneurysm is a weak spot in an artery wall that bulges out and fills with blood. In some cases, it can rupture and cause life-th...

    Magnetic Brain Stimulation Helped Rid Him of Decades-Long Depression

    When Tommy Van Brocklin signed up for a trial of a special type of magnetic brain stimulation therapy that could potentially ease his depression, he had already been living with the mood disorder for 45 years.

    Van Brocklin, 60, first underwent an MRI that located the part of his brain that regulates executive functions such as problem-solving and inhibits unwanted responses.

    Then fo...

    Could Breastfeeding Help Women Keep Their Smarts as They Age?

    Might breastfeeding affect a new mother's future brain health?

    That's the intriguing question posed by a new study that flips the narrative from the often-touted benefits for baby to what impact breastfeeding might hold for Mom years later.

    Researchers from UCLA Health found that women over age 50 who had breastfed their babies performed better on tests of brain function than those ...

    Recovering COVID Patients Often Face Long-Term 'Brain Fog'

    Even months after beating COVID-19, many people still suffer memory lapses, difficulty concentrating and other symptoms of "brain fog," a new study shows.

    Researchers found that such symptoms were prevalent seven months after a COVID diagnosis -- in both patients who'd been severely ill and hospitalized, and in those who'd managed a mild case at home.

    Along with the endurance of the...

    Right Amount of Sleep May Be Important in Early Alzheimer's

    Getting the right amount of sleep — not too much and not too little — could reduce your risk of mental decline as you age, even if you have early Alzheimer's disease, a new study claims.

    Poor sleep and Alzheimer's disease are both associated with thinking ("cognitive") declines, but separating out the effects of each has been a challenge.

    This new study included 100 older adults...

    Researchers Find Better Way to Fight Breast Cancer That Has Spread to Brain

    Researchers may have found a noninvasive way to temporarily open the brain's borders to allow tumor-fighting medication inside.

    By necessity, the brain is shielded by a layer of specialized cells called the blood-brain barrier. Its job is to allow needed substances in -- like oxygen and sugar -- while keeping out substances that could be toxic.

    Unfortunately, that means medications ...

    Long Bouts of Space Travel May Harm Astronauts' Brains

    Prolonged stays in space appear to damage astronauts' brains, a small, new study suggests.

    The researchers studied five Russian cosmonauts, mean age 49, who stayed on the International Space Station (ISS) for an average of 5.5 months.

    Blood samples were taken from the cosmonauts 20 days before their departure to the ISS, and one day, one week, and about three weeks after they return...

    Clot-Busting Drugs Safe in Stroke Patients When Brain Aneurysm Hasn't Ruptured

    Clot-busting drugs may be safe for certain stroke patients with brain aneurysms that haven't ruptured, researchers say.

    An aneurysm is a bulge in the wall of a blood vessel. In the new study, patients had suffered an ischemic stroke, which is caused by blocked blood flow in the brain.

    Even though clot-busting drugs are the main treatment for ischemic stroke, they're often not given ...

    'Personalized' Brain Zaps May Ease Tough-to-Treat Depression

    Imagine battling debilitating depression for years, trying everything but finding little or no relief.

    That's what Sarah, 36, lived with most of her adult life.

    "I had exhausted all possible treatment options," recalled Sarah, who did not want her last name used. "It [depression] had controlled my entire life. I barely moved. I barely did anything. I felt tortured every day."

    ...

    Shape, Size of Brain Arteries May Predict Stroke Risk

    The size and shape of the blood vessels in your brain may help predict your risk of an often-fatal type of stroke, called an aneurysm, a new study finds.

    An aneurysm is a bulge in an artery wall.

    "A subarachnoid hemorrhage is the most dangerous type of stroke and occurs when a brain aneurysm leaks or ruptures, causing bleeding into the brain, killing more than 50% of affected people...

    A Simple Way to Boost Kids' Reading Skills?

    A small fix might make reading a bit easier for kids with dyslexia, as well as their classmates: Increasing the amount of space between printed letters.

    That's the finding of a small study that tested the effects of "extra-large" letter spacing on school children's reading speed and accur...

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