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Second Death in Trial of Experimental Alzheimer's Drug Is Raising Concerns

Two people have now died from brain hemorrhages that may be linked to an experimental Alzheimer’s drug, calling into question the medication’s safety.

A 65-year-old woman with early-stage Alzheimer’s recently died from a massive brain bleed that some researchers link to lecanemab, an antibody drug designed to bind to and remove amyloid-beta from the brain, according to a report publ...

Amid a Surge in RSV Cases, Hopes for a New Vaccine

Infants and children sick with RSV are flooding pediatricians' offices and children’s hospitals across the United States, due to an early surge of the common childhood virus this year.

But within one or two “sick seasons,” doctors expect to have on hand long-sought tools to help blunt the impact of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV).

As many as four new RSV vaccine candidates c...

Clinical Trials Could Help Stop Alzheimer's. But Who Will Join Them?

New drugs that could slow or prevent the start of dementia would be groundbreaking, but a new poll suggests many middle-aged adults may be reluctant to take part in the studies that test those medications.

Only about 12% of the roughly 1,000 people aged 50 to 64 who were surveyed said they’re very likely to step forward to test a new dementia drug, according to the National Poll on Heal...

Pain Relief in a FLASH: Radiation Treatments Lasting Seconds May Advance Cancer Care

Flash radiotherapy, a new technology that uses targeted proton beams, is safe and effective in relieving pain for terminal cancer patients, a new, small study suggests.

Flash radiotherapy delivers radiation at dose rates more than 300 times higher than those used in conventional radiation...

Major Trial of Monkeypox Treatment TPOXX to Launch in Africa

The ability of TPOXX to treat people infected with monkeypox is being directly tested in a new clinical trial in central Africa, U.S. health officials have announced.

TPOXX — the antiviral drug tecovirimat — is only approved to treat

  • Dennis Thompson
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  • October 17, 2022
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  • Drug Shows Promise Against Autoimmune Disease Scleroderma

    Researchers report early success with using an existing rheumatoid arthritis (RA) drug to treat systemic sclerosis, a rare but potentially devastating autoimmune condition.

    The disease, a subset of scleroderma, ha...

    Alzheimer's Meds Are Mostly Tested in Whites. That Worries Black Patients, Caregivers

    Larry Griner resigned from his job in California and moved back to his childhood home in Baltimore nearly five years ago so he could care for his mother, Norma.

    She had been diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease almost 12 y...

    New Alzheimer's Drug Shows Promise in Phase 3 Clinical Trial

    WEDNESDAY, Sept. 28, 2022 (HealthDay) -- Japanese drugmaker Eisai on Wednesday said its experimental drug lecanemab helped slow thinking declines among people in the early stages of Alzheimer's disease.

    The findings from a phase 3 clinical trial have yet to be peer-reviewed in any medical journal. But accor...

    Screening Test Leads to Fewer Women Included in Autism Studies

    A frequently used screening test for autism creates a gender gap that could hinder diagnosis and treatment for women and girls, a new study suggests.

    Researchers who study autism have been working to include m...

    Experimental Drug Shows Promise Against Lupus

    An experimental drug that has been shown to treat rashes in people with lupus may also help with lupus-related joint pain.

    Affecting as many as 1.5 million people in the United States, lupus is an autoimmune disease in which the body's immune system misfires against its own joints, skin, brain, lungs, kidneys and blood vesse...

    New MS Treatment Shows Promise in Trial

    An experimental antibody therapy for multiple sclerosis can cut symptom flare-ups by half, versus a standard treatment, a new clinical trial has found.

    The drug, called ublituximab, beat a standard oral medication for

  • Amy Norton HealthDay Reporter
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  • August 25, 2022
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  • Pill to Counter Lupus Shows Promise in Mouse Study

    An experimental new pill could boost treatment of the autoimmune disease lupus, researchers reported at the American Chemical Society's annual meeting.

    The pill has been shown in mouse studies to inhibit lupus symptoms, reverse signs of organ damage, and prevent death,

  • By Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • August 25, 2022
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  • Women Still Underrepresented in Many Clinical Trials

    To ensure that all kinds of patients get drugs and devices that are safe and effective for them, they need to be represented in clinical trials, but a new study shows that representation of women in key disease areas conti...

    Cancer Clinical Trials Make Comeback After Pandemic Slowdown

    Cancer clinical trials in the United States appear to be rebounding after a significant slowdown during the pandemic, researchers say.

    For the study, the investigators analyzed data from the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston and the Tisch Cancer Institute at Mount Sinai Medical School in New Y...

    New Weight-Loss Drug Looks Good in Trial

    A newly approved drug for type 2 diabetes may be a game-changer for treating obesity, too.

    Given as a shot once a week, tirzepatide works on two naturally occurring hormones that help tell the brain that you are full. It may be as effective as weight-loss surgery.

    "About nine of 10 people in the study lost weight, and the average weight loss for the highest dose was 22.5%, which is ...

    In Small Study, New Treatment Brings Remission of Rectal Cancer in All Patients

    A small study delivers startling results on the power of a new immunotherapy treatment against rectal cancer: The drug triggered remission in all the patients who got it.

    All of them had mismatch repair-deficient (MMRd) locally advanced rectal cancer and were given dostarlimab - an anti-PD-...

    Immunotherapy Drug Can Lower Recurrence When Bladder Cancer Spreads

    Immunotherapy with nivolumab (Opdivo) after surgery for metastatic bladder cancer significantly reduces the odds for the tumor's return, a new clinical trial finds.

    Among 700 patients with urothelial cancer of the bladder or other parts of urinary tract that had spread to musc...

    Tongue Stimulator Shows Promise as Sleep Apnea Treatment in Kids With Down Syndrome

    Children with Down syndrome are more likely than other kids to have sleep apnea, and existing treatments often fail to work.

    Now, an implanted device that stimulates tongue nerves shows promise in reducing their sleep disruptions, a new study finds.

    A device called a hypoglossal nerve stimulator is already approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for adults with

  • By Robert Preidt HealthDay Reporter
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  • April 22, 2022
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  • Black Patients Less Likely to Get Into Pancreatic Cancer Clinical Trials

    Black Americans are far less likely to be included in clinical trials of pancreatic cancer drugs than white Americans, and eligibility criteria are a significant factor in that gap, according to a new study.

    "The standard of care in cancer treatment is informed by studies conducted with predominantly non-Hispanic white patients," said study author Dr. Jose Trevino, chairman of surgical on...

    Saving the 'Butterfly Children:' Gene Therapy Helps Heal Deadly Blistering Condition

    An experimental cream-based gene therapy may soon become the first U.S. government-approved means for treating a rare and devastating skin disease that produces "butterfly children."

    Patients with recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (EB) are called butterfly children "because their skin...

    Ketamine May Be Emergency Deterrent for People at Risk of Suicide

    A new clinical trial strengthens the case that ketamine -- once famous as a club drug -- can rapidly ease suicidal thoughts.

    Researchers found that among 156 adults hospitalized for severe suicidal thoughts, those given two doses of ketamine often saw those disturbing ideas go away within a few days.

    By day three, 63% were in full remission, compared to just under 32% of patients gi...

    A Better Clot-Buster Drug When Strokes Attack?

    A newer type of "clot-busting" medication might be safer than the one long used for treating strokes, a preliminary study hints.

    Researchers found that among nearly 7,900 stroke sufferers, those treated with the drug -- called tenecteplase -- were less likely to suffer life-threatening brain bleeding as a side effect, compared to those given the standard medication alteplase.

    Overal...

    Getting Active Soon After Concussion May Aid Kids' Recovery

    A return to non-contact physical activity three days after a concussion is safe and possibly even beneficial for kids, a Canadian clinical trial finds.

    "Gone are the days of resting in a dark room," said study co-author Andrée-Anne Ledoux, a scientist at the Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario Research Institute in Ottawa, Canada.

    The

  • Robert Preidt
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  • February 2, 2022
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  • Newer Rheumatoid Arthritis Drug Might Raise Heart, Cancer Risks

    Finding the right medication for rheumatoid arthritis isn't easy, and a newer pill against the disease carries higher risks of heart attack, stroke and cancer than older RA drugs, a new clinical trial confirms.

    The study was mandated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration after earlier safety signals about the drug, called tofacitinib (Xeljanz).

    In response to the findings, p...

    Saline IV Drip Just as Good as Pricier Options in Hospital ICUs: Study

    Saline intravenous (IV) fluids are as effective as more costly solutions in treating intensive care patients and keeping them alive, Australian researchers report.

    "Just about every patient admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) will receive intravenous fluids for resuscitation or as part of standard treatment," noted

  • Robert Preidt
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  • January 26, 2022
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  • Exposing Kids to Safe Levels of Peanut When Young Might Prevent Allergy

    Some kids might be able to get over their peanut allergy if they start immunotherapy while they're still toddlers, a major new clinical trial reports.

    In the trial, a group of 1- to 3-year-olds with severe peanut allergies were safely fed gradually increasing daily doses...

    Immune-Based Drug Fights Advanced Endometrial Cancer: Study

    A drug used to treat several types of cancer is also an effective treatment for aggressive forms of endometrial cancer, the second most common cancer in women worldwide, a new clinical trial shows. The endometrium is the inner lining of the uterus.

    "These findings suggest a long-term benefit to patients," said lead researcher Dr. David O'Malley, a gynecologic oncologist at the Ohio State ...

    Drug Combo Boosts Outcomes for Advanced Melanoma

    For people newly diagnosed with advanced melanoma, a combination of two immunotherapy drugs can double the amount of time their cancer remains progression-free, a clinical trial has found.

    The treatment combines two drugs known as immune checkpoint inhibitors. One, called nivolumab (Opdivo), is already standard for advanced melanoma; the other, relatlimab, is not yet approved.

    But b...

    Drug Might Help Ease 'Sensory Demands' of Autism

    A medication that acts on certain brain receptors can temporarily ease visual-processing problems in some adults with autism, a small study has found.

    Researchers said it's far too early to know whether the drug, arbaclofen, could prove useful in managing those visual issues. But the findings do give in...

    Once-a-Day HIV Pill Works Well for Kids

    An international trial found that a once-a-day antiretroviral medication for kids with HIV is not only cheap and easy to take, but also better at suppressing HIV than standard treatments.

    "Our findings provide strong evidence for the global rollout of dolutegravir for children with HIV," said Dr. Diana Gibb, a professor of epidemiology at University College London and a principal investig...

    Could a High-Fiber Diet Help Boost Cancer Survival?

    People undergoing immune-boosting therapy for advanced melanoma may respond better if they eat a high-fiber diet, a new study hints.

    Researchers said much more study is needed, but their initial findings -- in both melanoma patients and lab mice -- suggest that

    Fish Oil Has No Effect on Depression, Study Finds

    They may have other proven health benefits, but new research shows that fish oil supplements don't prevent depression or improve mood.

    Some experts recommend omega-3 fish oil supplements to help prevent depression in high-risk patients, but studies have yielded mixed results and there are no g...

    Pfizer Vaccine Disappoints in Kids Ages 2 to 5

    Two doses of a pediatric Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine failed to spur an adequate immune response in children aged 2 to 5, the companies announced Friday.

    That's a setback for parents hoping to get their youngest children immunized against the new coronavirus as soon as possible.

    The pediatric trials used a 3 microgram (mcg) dose of the vaccine -- equivalent to about one-ten...

    Drug Combo May Fight a Tough Form of Breast Cancer

    An experimental drug, added to chemotherapy, may benefit women with an aggressive form of breast cancer, suggests an early study offering much-needed good news.

    The study involved women with "triple-negative" breast cancer, which accounts for about 15% to 20% of breast cancers among U.S. women. It is so called because the cancers lack receptors for the hormones estrogen and progesterone, ...

    Could Gene Therapy Help Cure Sickle Cell Disease?

    A gene therapy that could provide a permanent cure for sickle cell disease continues to show success through a third wave of patients, researchers report.

    The therapy, LentiGlobin, restored normal blood function in 35 sickle cell patients who had the one-time procedure, according to clinical trial findings published Dec. 12 in the

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • December 13, 2021
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  • New Treatment Greatly Boosts Survival for Kids With Aggressive Brain Cancer

    Children with the rare cancer neuroblastoma often succumb to the disease despite aggressive treatment. But researchers have found that adding an experimental antibody to that treatment, right off the bat, may improve their outlook.

    Of 64 children treated with the antibody in a clinical trial, 74% were still alive and free of a recurrence three years later. That compares with historical ra...

    New Asthma Drug Helps Kids, But Price Tag Is High

    Children with hard-to-control asthma may get relief from adding an injectable antibody drug to their standard treatment, a clinical trial has found.

    The drug, called dupilumab (Dupixent), has been available for several years to treat stubborn asthma in adults and teenagers. Based on the new findings, the

  • Amy Norton HealthDay Reporter
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  • December 9, 2021
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  • Clinical Trials Are Becoming More Diverse, But There's Still Work To Do

    U.S. cancer clinical trial participants have become more diverse in makeup, but certain groups remain underrepresented, a new study finds.

    It's important to have a wide range of participants in clinical trials, to find out if treatments are safe and effective for people with different characteristics, according to the National Cancer Institute (NCI), which has a number of initiatives to b...

    Drug Long Used for Alcoholism Might Fight Severe COVID-19

    A widely available drug used to treat alcoholism has potential as a COVID-19 treatment, researchers say.

    The investigators found that people taking disulfiram (Antabuse) for alcoholism had a lower risk of infection with SARS-CoV-2 and were less likely to die from COVID-19 if infected than those not taking the drug.

  • Robert Preidt
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  • November 23, 2021
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  • Wearable Vibration Device May Ease Parkinson's Tremor

    Physiotherapist David Putrino was working on a vibrating glove to help deaf people experience live music when a friend mentioned that the same technology might stop tremors in people with Parkinson's disease.

    Putrino, director of rehabilitation innovation for Mount Sinai Health System in New York City, was intrigued. The friend's father had Parkinson's, so they placed the new device on hi...

    Neurologists' Group Issues Guidance to Families on Controversial Alzheimer's Drug

    Neurologists must make sure Alzheimer's patients and their families understand that the controversial drug aducanumab does not restore mental function, the American Academy of Neurology (AAN) said in new position statement that includes ethical guidelines.

    "Aducanumab is not a cure for Alzheimer's disease, yet since it has been approved by the [U.S. Food and Drug Administration], patients...

    Trial Begins of Nasal Vaccine for Alzheimer's Disease

    The first human clinical trial of a nasal vaccine to slow the progression of Alzheimer's disease is set to begin after nearly 20 years of research.

    This is a "remarkable milestone," according to Dr. Howard Weiner, co-director of the Ann Romney Center for Neurologic Diseases at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston.

    "Over the last two decades, we've amassed preclinical evidence sugg...

    Stem Cell Therapy Boosts Outcomes for Some Heart Failure Patients

    Heart failure patients who fit a specific profile can benefit from injection of stem cells delivered directly into their heart muscle, a new study finds.

    Patients with mild or moderate heart failure who have high levels of inflammation responded well to the stem cell injections, and experienced a decline in their risk of heart attacks, strokes and heart-related death, clinical trial resul...

    More Evidence That COVID Vaccines Are Safe for Cancer Patients

    COVID-19 vaccines are safe and effective for most cancer patients, a new study confirms.

    Cancer patients have an increased risk of severe illness and death from COVID because their immune systems have been weakened by their disease or treatments.

    "We pursued this study because there were limited data on the safety of SARS-CoV-2 vaccines in people with active cancer; no published pro...

    Placebo Effect Plays Big Role in Antidepressant's Impact on Anxiety: Study

    Illustrating the power of the mind to heal itself, new research suggests that the placebo effect could help drive antidepressants' effects against anxiety disorders.

    The placebo effect refers to an increase in the success of a treatment when a patient expects a benefit.

    In the new study, patients with s...

    We've Been Here Before: How Polio Vaccine Rollout Saved Millions of Young Lives

    An infection that can disable and kill stalks the land, but a brand-new vaccine offers hope that almost everyone, kids included, can evade it. After scientific testing, a nationwide rollout of the vaccine begins.

    Sound familiar?

    As the U.S. government gears up to offer COVID-19 shots to about 28 million 5- to 11-year-olds, high levels of vaccine hesitancy in some corners may make t...

    How Two People With HIV Suppressed Virus After Stopping Treatment

    There are two ways that HIV patients' bodies can keep the virus under control after they stop antiretroviral therapy, a new study shows.

    The findings could point to ways to help people with HIV keep the virus in remission without having to keep taking medications that can have long-term side effects, according to researchers at the U.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease...

    Shorter Course of Post-Op Radiation May Work Well for Prostate Cancer Patients

    After prostate cancer surgery, men can safely undergo fewer radiation treatments at higher doses, a new clinical trial shows.

    Researchers found that the shorter regimen -- given over five weeks, instead of seven -- did not raise patients' odds of lasting side effects.

    Safety has been a "major concern" because when patients have fewer radiation treatments, the daily dose needs to be ...

    Targeted High-Dose Radiation Helps Fight Advanced Lung Cancer

    High-dose radiation therapy may stall tumor growth in patients with advanced lung cancer who are not fully responding to drug therapies, a preliminary study suggests.

    The study involved patients whose lung cancer was considered "oligoprogressive." That means the cancer had spread to other sites in the body, and the patients were having a mixed response to standard systemic treatments -- i...

    Moderna Says Its COVID Vaccine Works Well in Children Aged 6 to 11

    Moderna announced Monday that its COVID-19 vaccine safely triggers a strong immune response in children aged 6 to 11.

    Company data shows that a month after receiving both doses of the vaccine, children's antibody levels were 1.5 ...