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02 Dec

HealthDay Now: What To Expect From Psychedelic Therapy

In a HealthDay Now interview, we spoke to award-nominated actor, Tony Head, a research participant in a Johns Hopkins clinical trial of psilocybin. Tony was diagnosed with stage 4 prostate cancer in 2011 and he shares how his experience with psilocybin helped him face his fears of dying.

Health News Results - 222

COVID Hospitalizations Rising in Kids Too Young for Vaccine

While COVID-19 has taken the lives of many children and caused serious illness for many more, it is generally agreed that the virus is much less likely to inflict severe damage in the young.

But new data from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has revealed a concerning...

Nearly 600,000 U.S. Kids Had COVID Last Week

In a sign that the highly contagious Omicron variant is sparing no one, a new report shows that new COVID-19 cases among U.S. children spiked to a high of more than 580,000 for the week ending Jan. 6, a 78% increase from the week before.

"Since many children remain unvaccinated — or are too young to be vaccinated — children are bearing a disproportionate burden of this illness," said...

White House to Give Schools 10 Million Free COVID Tests Every Month

In an effort to keep kids in classrooms, the White House announced Wednesday that 10 million free coronavirus tests will be provided to schools around the country every month while the wildly contagious Omicron variant continues to surge.

President Joe Biden has been pushing for months to have schools stay open because the academic, social and emotional toll of remote learning has put kid...

Urban Air Pollution Drives Millions of Cases of Asthma in Kids

Far fewer kids might develop asthma if there were less traffic pollution, suggests a new study that researched the issue worldwide.

"Our study found that nitrogen dioxide puts children at risk of developing asthma and the problem is especially acute in urban areas," said study author Susan Anenberg, a professor of environmental and occupational health at George Washington University in Wa...

CDC Panel Backs FDA Approval of Boosters for Those Aged 12-15

An advisory panel to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on Wednesday backed the emergency use approval of Pfizer's booster shots for those between the ages of 12 and 17.

The Food and Drug Administration had announced the move on Monday.

In arriving at its decision, the CDC advisory panel pointed to rising COVID hospitalizations among the young as the

  • Robin Foster HealthDay Reporter
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  • January 5, 2022
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  • CDC Backs Boosters for High-Risk Kids Aged 5-11, Shorter Time Between Shots

    The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on Tuesday backed the emergency use approval of Pfizer's booster shot for high-risk kids between the ages of 5 and 11, along with shortening the time period between a second dose and a booster shot from six months to five months.

  • Robin Foster HealthDay Reporter
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  • January 4, 2022
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  • U.S. Hospitals Seeing Record Numbers of Young COVID Patients

    COVID-19 hospitalizations among children are surging across the United States just as students return to school and the highly transmissible Omicron variant begins to dominate the country.

    At least nine states have reported record numbers of COVID-related pediatric hospitalizations: They include Connecticut, Georgia, Illinois, Kentucky, Massachusetts, Maine, Missouri, Ohio and Pennsylv...

    Study Finds No Ties Between Youth Tackle Football, Brain/Behavioral Issues

    Many parents struggle with the decision to let their kids play tackle football or other contact sports due to the risk of concussions and long-term brain diseases that may occur with repeated head blows.

    Now, new...

    Severe Illness in Children Brings Hardship for Families

    When a sick child spends time in the intensive care unit, the impact lasts even after the hospital stay is over.

    Added to it are days, weeks, sometimes months out of school for the young patient and extended work absences for their primary caregivers.

    "Pediatric critical illness impacts a family’s health and well-being not only during the child’s treatment but after they leave ...

    Cochlear Implants a Big Help to Deaf Children With Autism

    Having autism spectrum disorder (ASD) can make communication a challenge, and some of these children are also deaf, making social interactions even more daunting.

    But new research suggests that cochlear implants can go a long way toward helping these kids understand speech and connect with others.

    A long-term survey that followed 30 children who had

  • Cara Murez
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  • December 29, 2021
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  • Weak Action on Climate Change Is Stressing Young People Worldwide

    While climate change calls to mind extreme weather and melting polar ice caps, government officials' inaction to stop it is also affecting the mental health of young people, new research reveals.

    "This study paints a horrific picture of widespread climate anxiety in our children and young peo...

    As Omicron Spreads, Child Hospitalizations Climb 30% in Past Week

    Child hospitalizations for COVID-19 jumped 30% this past week as the Omicron variant spread like wildfire throughout the United States.

    By Dec. 28, the country had an average of 260 pediatric COVID-19 hospitalizations each day, according to the latest data from the U.S. Centers for Disease Cont...

    Severe Illness in a Child Takes Big Toll on Parents, Siblings: Study

    When a child has severe health problems, the suffering often extends to the entire family, new research finds.

    Using data from a single health insurance provider, the study authors assessed nearly 7,000 children with life-threatening conditions and their families, and compared them to a control group of more than 18,600 children without a life-threatening condition and their families.

    ...

    Program Aims to Get Lifesaving Drugs to Kids With Cancer in Poorer Countries

    A new program to boost the supply of cancer medicines for children in low- and middle-income countries has been announced by the World Health Organization (WHO) and St. Jude Children's Research Hospital.

    The hospital is making a six-year, $200 million investment to launch the Global Platform for Access to Childhood C...

    Scientists Get to the Root of 'Chalky Teeth' in Kids

    Researchers who say they have discovered what causes kids to have "chalky teeth" predict it could lead to new ways to fight it and cut cavities by half.

    One in five children have chalky teeth -- visible as discolored enamel spots -- which can cause severe toothache and decay, sometimes resulting in abscesses, extractions and other problems.

    "We can’t yet prevent chalky teeth from ...

    Medical Marijuana May Help Ease Severe Epilepsy in Kids: Study

    Kids with severe epilepsy may take multiple medications and follow special diets, yet still suffer seizures. Now a small study suggests medical marijuana may sometimes help when other therapies fail.

    British researchers found that medical pot slashed seizures by almost 90% and reduced use of traditional medications.

    But at least one outside expert cautions that it’s way too early ...

    What Does 'Long COVID' Look Like in Kids?

    Long COVID can be tough to diagnose in children, but there are a number of things to look for.

    “Many children don’t have any symptoms when they have a COVID infection,” said Dr. Sindhu Mohandas, a pediatric infectious disease specialist and attending physician at Children’s Hospital Los Angeles. “So if the symptoms of long COVID appear later, it can be difficult to link them to ...

    Febrile Seizures: How to Protect Your Child

    Fever-related seizures in young children can be alarming for parents, but they're usually not life-threatening, an expert says.

    During a so-called febrile seizure, a child may lose consciousness, experience body stiffness and have full-body shaking. The seizures — which typically last a minute or two, but can go on longer — rarely require medication, and the majority don't require hos...

    New Treatment Greatly Boosts Survival for Kids With Aggressive Brain Cancer

    Children with the rare cancer neuroblastoma often succumb to the disease despite aggressive treatment. But researchers have found that adding an experimental antibody to that treatment, right off the bat, may improve their outlook.

    Of 64 children treated with the antibody in a clinical trial, 74% were still alive and free of a recurrence three years later. That compares with historical ra...

    New Asthma Drug Helps Kids, But Price Tag Is High

    Children with hard-to-control asthma may get relief from adding an injectable antibody drug to their standard treatment, a clinical trial has found.

    The drug, called dupilumab (Dupixent), has been available for several years to treat stubborn asthma in adults and teenagers. Based on the new findings, the

  • Amy Norton HealthDay Reporter
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  • December 9, 2021
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  • More Time Outdoors May Lower Risk of MS in Youth

    Children at risk for multiple sclerosis (MS) might find some protection from the disease by spending more time in the sun, a small study suggests.

    Although MS is rare in children and young adults, those with relatives who have the condition have increased odds of developing the disease early. Exposure to sunlight may cut their risk in half, researchers say.

    "In fami...

    Another Benefit to Asthma Control for Kids: Less Bullying

    Kids can be cruel, and bullies often zero in on kids they view as weak or different, including those with asthma.

    One in 10 children with asthma say they have been bullied or teased as a result of their condition, but tight asthma control seems to keep bullying at bay, a new study suggests....

    Are Your Holiday Gifts on the 'Noisy Toy List'?

    Stop that racket!

    A screeching rubber chicken tops this year's list of noisy toys that pose a threat to children's hearing.

    The Sight & Hearing Association's annual Noisy Toys List for 2021 includes toys that tested louder than 85 decibels (dB), which is the U.S. National Institute...

    Mom's Pre-Pregnancy Weight Could Affect Odds for Child's Asthma, Allergies

    Can your weight before pregnancy determine your baby's chances of developing asthma or allergies?

    Yes, claims a study that looked at that question, as well as whether weight gain during pregnancy might have an impact.

    "We did find that there was a link between the mother's weight before pregnancy, entering pregnancy, with the development of certain allergic diseases among c...

    Many Kids Separated From Families at U.S. Border Suffer PTSD

    Parents and children who were separated under the Trump administration's "zero tolerance" immigration policy have shown lasting psychological trauma -- even after being reunited, a new study finds.

    Between 2017 and 2018, more than 5,000 children were separated from their parents at the U.S.-Mexico border under the policy, which aimed to deter asylum seekers.

    The practice was denounc...

    Gene Therapy May Reverse Hurler Syndrome, a Rare and Severe Illness in Kids

    Gene therapy might soon offer a new option for children with a rare genetic disorder that damages tissues throughout the body, researchers are reporting.

    In a study of eight children with the condition, called Hurler syndrome, researchers found that the gene therapy was safe over two years. It also showed potential for beating the current standard treatment, stem cell transplantation.

    ...

    WHO, CDC Warn of Measles Threat After 22 Million Infants Miss Shots During Pandemic

    The world faces an increased risk of a measles outbreak because 22 million infants did not get their measles shots last year due to the pandemic, the World Health Organization and U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention warned Wednesday.

    They said that 3 million fewer infants were vaccinated against measles in 2020 than in 2019, and just 70% of infants received both doses of the t...

    A High-Tech Pointer to Pollutants That Trigger Asthma in Kids

    Dust mites and smoke are known triggers of asthma in children. Now, scientists have identified previously unknown combinations of air pollutants that appear tied to the respiratory disorder.

    "Asthma is one the most prevalent diseases affecting children in the United States. In this study, we developed a list of air pollutants a young child may be exposed to that can lead to longer-term pr...

    New Device Might Spot 'Lazy Eye' in Kids Earlier

    The answer to helping kids with "lazy eye" before it's too late could be a hand-held screening device, a new study suggests.

    Amblyopia can't be treated with glasses or contact lenses after a child's vision reaches maturity, and without treatment, it can lead to poor school performance and impairments in depth perception and fine motor skills, doctors say.

    "The findings suggest that ...

    '6 Stages' Approach Might Help Families Coping With ADHD

    Researchers have created a six-stage process to help families of children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) deal with the disorder.

    "This framework is family-centered, focused on breaking down the barriers that families face from before diagnosis to preparing children with ADHD for the future," said Dr. Andrea Spencer, director of the Reach for ADHD Research Program at ...

    Most Kids Newly Diagnosed With ADHD Aren't Getting Best Care

    Preschoolers with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) rarely receive the gold-standard treatment recommended by the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) for their condition, a new study reports.

    The AAP recommends a behavioral therapy technique called "parent training in behavior management," or PTBM, as first-line treatment for ADHD kids ages 4 and 5.

    But only 1 of eve...

    RSV Is Common, Dangerous Infection: What Parents Need to Know

    Watch closely if your kids appear to have a common cold this fall or winter. It could instead be respiratory syncytial virus, known as RSV, and that makes it more likely to progress to a serious lower lung infection.

    RSV is back in force this year after a reprieve while many stayed home last year because of the COVID-19 pandemic, according to experts at Penn State Health.

    "The ...

    Kids Can Carry High, Infectious Levels of COVID Coronavirus

    From newborns to new adults, young people who get COVID-19 can carry high levels of the virus and spread it to others even if they show no symptoms.

    That's the takeaway from a study of 110 people between 2 weeks and 21 years of age who tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 infection.

    Researchers found that infants, children and teens were equally capable of carrying high levels of live, re...

    Kids With Autism Find It Tough to Read Hidden Emotions: Study

    When you're putting on a brave face to mask disappointment or shedding tears of joy, kids with autism are likely to misunderstand how you're really feeling.

    That's because they don't use context to identify underlying emotions, according to a new study investigating whether kids with autism are able to tell when one emotion is concealing a different one.

    The comparative analysis loo...

    Helmets Can Saves Lives in ATV, Dirt Bike Crashes

    New research provides further proof that helmets are essential for young users of all-terrain vehicles (ATVs) and dirt bikes.

    Wearing a helmet significantly reduces their risk of moderate or severe head injuries in crashes, and also lowers their risk of death, the study found.

    "For neurosurgeons treating pediatric trauma patients, these findings are not at all surprising," said stud...

    Social Distancing Kept Kids From Getting Flu, RSV

    Social distancing and mask mandates during the pandemic nearly eliminated cases of the flu and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) among children, a new study finds.

    "Numbers don't lie. Face masking, and proper hygiene and isolation, can be effective means to protect the vulnerable groups, such as the elderly and young children, during the respiratory virus season," said study author Dr. Os...

    Could an App Help Kids With Severe Ear Condition Avoid Surgery?

    A pair of special headphones plus a free app might help kids with hearing difficulty due to "glue ear," a new, small study suggests.

    Glue ear is slang for a condition called otitis media with effusion (OME), where thick fluid builds up in the middle ear. It's very common in young children but strikes older kids as well, and often occurs after a cold or sore throat. Usually, the fluid goes...

    Parents of Hospitalized Kids Need More Info on Costs: Study

    Having a child in the hospital is distressing for families, and not knowing what that stay might cost can add to that stress, researchers say.

    A new study has found that three-quarters of U.S. families want to have conversations about the costs of care. Yet only 7% of families actually have had this financial counseling with hospital staff.

    The research suggests that patients and th...

    Doctors Often Miss Signs of Type 1 Diabetes in Kids

    Potentially dangerous symptoms of type 1 diabetes in children are not always immediately recognized by primary care providers, new research suggests.

    In type 1 diabetes, the pancreas fails to make enough insulin, the hormone that helps regulate blood sugar used for energy by cells. Between 5% and 10% of cases of diabetes are type 1, which often first surfaces in childhood.

    The Swed...

    Watch Their Backs -- Don't Overload Those Schoolbags

    After more than a year at home, children are heading back to classrooms across the country. But they're also toting heavy bags on their backs again.

    A backpack that fits properly -- and is not overloaded with binders and books -- will help prevent injury.

    "With a focus on getting back in the classroom and returning to 'normal,' it's easy to overlook possible injuries caused by ...

    Child Cancers Are Rare, But Here Are Signs to Look For

    Most parents want their children to live carefree lives, so a diagnosis of childhood cancer is devastating. Fortunately, pediatric cancers are rare.

    Yet it doesn't hurt to be watchful for the warning signs, suggest experts in childhood cancer from Penn State Health.

    The best screening most parents can do is to stay on track with well-child visits, the doctors said.

    "For e...

    Kids' Temporary Tattoos Can Harm Skin Function

    Parents: You may think temporary tattoos are harmless for children. But kids who decorate themselves with these transfer tattoos may be disrupting the skin's protective barrier, Spanish researchers report.

    They looked at the effects on skin of permanent tattoos and temporary transfers. The surprising takeaway: Temporary transfer tattoos do more damage.

    More moisture was lost in skin...

    Getting Kids Eyeglasses Boosts School Grades: Study

    New glasses are helping kids in Baltimore see more success in school.

    A three-year clinical study found that students who got new eyeglasses through a school-based program had higher reading and math test scores.

    "The glasses offered the biggest benefit to the very kids who needed it the most -- the ones who were really struggling in school," said Dr. Megan Collins, a pediatric opht...

    Few Kids Get Dental Fluoride Treatments, Though Insurance Will Pay

    Very few privately insured young children get recommended dental fluoride treatments at health wellness visits, even though insurance typically covers them, a new study finds.

    "Medical providers are not required to do this; it's like a mammogram," said lead author Kimberley Geissler, an associate professor of health policy and management at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. "It's r...

    Eczema Can Take Toll on Child's Mental Health

    Eczema doesn't just irritate kids' skin. The often disfiguring condition may also be tied to depression, anxiety and sleep difficulties, new research warns.

    A study of more than 11,000 British children and teens found that those with severe eczema were twice as likely to become clinically depressed as eczema-free kids.

    "Eczema is an itchy red skin disease," said study author D...

    No Lasting Damage to Lungs After COVID in Young Patients: Study

    Young people appear to have normal lung function after recovering from COVID-19, new studies find.

    In one, Swedish researchers found that even asthma patients had no significant impairment in lung function.

    In the other, German researchers found unimpaired lung function after kids and teens had a COVID-19 infection -- unless their infection was severe.

    "The COVID-19 pandemic h...

    Leaving Work to Care for Special Needs Child Takes Big Financial Toll

    Having a special needs child can mean medical emergencies and doctors' visits where parents have to take time off from work, and now a new study shows that can bring a bit financial hit to a family.

    Researchers analyzed U.S. government data from more than 14,000 families in that situation and found they lost an average of $18,000 a year in household income in 2016-2017.

    "We found a ...

    Your Young Child Is Sick: Is it COVID or RSV?

    A common bug called respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) circulating among American kids during what's normally its off-season may cause concern if parents don't know how to tell it apart from COVID-19, experts say.

    Getting RSV during the summer is unusual, but the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recently issued an alert about a rise in RSV cases in Southern states.

    "We...

    Common Pesticide to Be Banned Over Links to  Problems in Children

    The Biden Administration said Wednesday that a widely used pesticide will be banned because it's been linked to neurological damage in children.

    The new rule to block the use of chlorpyrifos on food will take effect in six months, the Environmental Protection Agency said.

    "Today [the] EPA is taking an overdue step to protect public health," EPA head Michael Regan said in an agency ...

    RSV Respiratory Illnesses Rising for Babies, Experts Warn

    While the resurgence of COVID-19 cases in the United States has been dominating the news, an old viral enemy has been making a quieter comeback.

    In late spring, U.S. pediatric hospitals began reporting an unexpected rise in serious infections caused by respiratory syncytial virus (RSV).

    Unlike COVID-19, RSV is a long-established foe that normally emerges in late fall, peaks in the ...

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