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Experts Issue Warning About Carbon Monoxide Dangers Ahead of Hurricane Ian

As Florida and nearby states brace for the potential impact of Hurricane Ian, residents in the storm's path should also think about the hazards they may face in its aftermath.

If high winds take out your electricity, the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) offers tips for staying safe.

First, be cautious about using a generator. The carbon monoxide (CO) from a porta...

A Hotter World Can Worsen Heart Failure

Climate change could spell trouble for those with heart failure, a new study suggests.

When the temperatures soared in France during the summer of 2019, the heat wave appears to have worsened the conditions of heart failure patients, researchers report.

"The finding is timely, given the heat waves again this year," said study a...

High Levels of PFAS 'Forever' Chemicals in Kids' School Uniforms

Your children's school clothes may look neat, but are they safe to wear?

Maybe not.

Researchers found high levels of dangerous chemicals called per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) in school uniforms sold across North America. These chemicals — which can build up in people and the envir...

As Thermometer Rises, So Does Hate Speech on Twitter

Internet hotheads are often literally that, with hateful tweets rising in number as temperatures soar, a new study reports.

Temperatures higher than 86 degrees Fahrenheit are consistently linked to heavy increases in online hate messages, according to a review of more than 4 billion English-language tweets.

The researchers identified a “feel-good window” between 54 and 70 degree...

America's Rural Roads: Quiet But Deadly, New Report Finds

A new report reveals a hidden secret about the nation's beautiful rural roads: They're too often fatal for motorists.

Nearly half of all U.S. crashes happen on rural roads, despite only 19% of Americans living in those areas. The report, conducted by the Governors Highway Safety Association (GHSA), details why and what can be done to prevent these fatal crashes.

“Roads are the b...

Wildlife Crossings Over Highways Save Human Lives, Too

In Washington state, 22 wildlife bridges and underpasses provide animals with a safe way through to search for food or escape predators and wildfires.

It turns out the crossings have been benefiting humans, too.

In a 10-mile radius around wildlife crossings, there are between one and three fewer collisions a year between vehicles and animals, a

  • Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • August 31, 2022
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  • Heat Waves That Threaten Lives Will Be Common by 2100

    Life-threatening heat waves will become more common by the end of this century, according to a new study.

    A “dangerous” heat index — what the temperature feels like when humidity and air temperature are combined — is defined by the National Weather Service (NWS) as 103 degrees Fahrenheit. NWS defines “extremely dangerous” as 124 degrees F -- unsafe to humans for any amount of ...

    Too Few U.S. Cities Have Good Hurricane Evacuation Plans

    This year's hurricane season has been quiet so far, but if and when it cranks up many American cities won't be prepared to execute mass evacuations, a new study finds.

    After Hurricane Katrina slammed into New Orleans in 2005, the country bore witness to the pitfalls of not having an effective evacuation plan. Since then on...

    You Could Live 9 Years Longer in Hawaii Than in Mississippi, New Data Shows

    Differences in lifestyles and other factors are linked to big gaps in life expectancy between residents of various U.S. states, 2020 data shows.

    That could mean almost a decade more or less of life, a new report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows.

    “Among the 50 states a...

    Breakthrough Might Break Down PFAS 'Forever Chemicals'

    PFAS compounds are known as “forever chemicals” because they degrade slowly in the environment and accumulate in the body, potentially harming human and animal health.

    Bacteria can't eat them. Fire can't incinerate them. Water can't dilute them.

    Instead, these per- and polyfluoroalkyl subs...

    U.S. Nursing Homes Are Understaffed, But Minority Communities Have It Worst

    Staffing shortages at nursing homes across the United States are severe in disadvantaged areas where needs may be greatest, researchers say.

    The study — recently published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society — looked at staffing before the COVID-19 pandemic. It f...

    Heat, Smoke & the Heart: Wildfires Cause Cardiac Crises

    While most people know that breathing in wildfire smoke isn't good for respiratory health, they may not know that unclean air is also problematic for the heart.

    Individuals with underlying

  • By Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • August 15, 2022
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  • Biden to Sign Bill That Helps Veterans Exposed to Toxic Burn Pits

    President Biden was poised on Wednesday to sign a bill that expands health care benefits for U.S. veterans exposed to toxic burn pits.

    Known as the PACT Act, the legislation is the biggest expansion of veterans' health care and benefits in more than 30 years, the White House said in a

  • By Steven Reinberg HealthDay Reporter
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  • August 10, 2022
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  • U.S.-Russia Nuclear War Could Leave 5 Billion Dead Due to Famine

    Even a "small" nuclear war, far short of a global conflict, could kill much of the world's population due to starvation, a new study projects.

    Any nuclear war would have obviously devastating effects in the places where it was waged — obliterating cities, instantly killing huge numbers of people, and contaminating local soil and water.

    But the destruction would be expected to stre...

    Climate Change Making 218 Infectious Diseases Even Worse

    Flooding, heat waves and drought have made 58% of infectious diseases worse, a new analysis claims.

    For the review of previous studies, published Aug. 8 in the journal Nature Climate Change, researchers found that 218 of the known 375 infectious diseases have been made worse by climate change, including

    Global Warming Will Mean More Unfit, Unhealthy Kids Worldwide: Study

    Children are not as physically fit as their parents were when they were kids, and this will likely harm them as the Earth warms, new research claims.

    The findings are based on a comprehensive review of more than 150 studies that looked at how children maintain physical activity, exercise and cope with heat, as well as how thi...

    PFAS 'Forever Chemicals' Cost the U.S. Billions

    They are called "forever chemicals" because they linger in the human body and can contribute to the risk of everything from cancer to childhood obesity.

    Now, new research on per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) finds they also exact a huge financial toll, costing the U.S. health system billions every year.

    ...

    It's Hurricane Season, So Get Your Storm Medical Kit Together

    Living in a region where tropical storms, hurricanes or other weather emergencies are likely means being ready for a quick evacuation.

    "Part of preparedness is having a plan," said Dr. James McDeavitt, executive vice president and dean of clinical affairs at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston. "You don't want to make that plan as the hurricane is barreling down the coast. You need to <...

    Neighborhood Drop in Violent Crime May Also Boost Heart Health

    Every town wants low crime rates. But a new finding may offer a whole new reason to advocate for the change: Falling crime rates may lower heart disease fatalities.

    An analysis of 2000-2014 data from Chicago illustrated a significant decline in violent crime. Across the city, the drop in total crime was 16%, while simultaneously there was a 13% decrease in

  • By Ellie Quinlan Houghtaling HealthDay Reporter
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  • July 18, 2022
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  • Do You Live in America's Fittest City? Experts Rank Best to Worst

    Want to get fit and stay fit? Arlington, Va., may be the city for you: For the fifth year in a row, it has been named the fittest city in America.

    Meanwhile, the title of the least fit city goes to Oklahoma City, according to the annual fitnes...

    High Heat, Heavy Smog a Deadly Combo: Study

    Heat coupled with smog can be a particularly lethal mix, especially for older adults, a new study finds.

    Unfortunately, both hot temperatures and air pollution are going to increase as the planet warms, and so will deaths, researchers report.

    "We are experiencing more and more frequent wildfires, which cause pollution, and

    Gas Used in Homes Has Links to Cancer; Leaks Often Undetected

    The natural gas being piped into your home contains a wide array of toxic chemicals, including nearly two dozen so harmful they're classified as hazardous air pollutants, a new study says.

    Natural gas samples taken from 69 Boston-area cooking stoves were found to contain at least 21 different hazardous air pollutants, including benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylene and hexane, according ...

    Is Politics Creating a 'Mortality Gap' for Americans?

    The sharp political divide in the United States may also be creating a widening gap in death rates between those on opposing sides, new research suggests.

    For the study, researchers at Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH) in Boston analyzed death rates and federal and state election data for all U.S. counties from 2001 to 2019.

    During that time, deaths rates in Democratic counties fel...

    Making U.S. Cities Greener Could Have Saved Thousands of Lives

    Creating more parks and other green spaces could have prevented tens of thousands of deaths in dozens of large U.S. cities over the past two decades, a new study says.

    "We've known that living in greener areas can have a

    Spring's Double Trouble: Asthma Plus Seasonal Allergies

    If you have both asthma and seasonal allergies, there are ways to reduce the impacts of that double whammy, an expert says.

    People with asthma, a chronic lung condition, should try to control or prevent allergic outbreaks, said Dr. Miranda Curtiss, an assistant professor at the University of Alabama at Birmingham School...

    It's 'Kids to Parks Day': Get Out, Get Active

    It's a good idea to get children outside every day, but especially on Kids to Parks Day, a national day of outdoor play on May 21.

    "Even as the COVID-19 pandemic continues, outdoor time and nature exploration are safe for most kids," pediatrician Dr. Danette Glassy said in an ...

    Global Warming Could Mean Less Sleep for Billions

    Anyone who's tried to sleep on a hot summer night knows how hard it is to nod off when the mercury is rising.

    So it's no surprise that global warming is likely to cost people more and more shut-eye as temperatures around the world rise.

    By the end of this century, individuals could be subjected to at least two weeks of short sleep each year due to high temperatures driven by global ...

    Workers in U.S. Southwest in Peril as Summer Temperatures Rise

    It's getting hotter and hotter outside due to global warming and, as a result, outdoor workers in southwestern states are increasingly vulnerable to heat-related illnesses.

    Making matters worse, many of these workers may not realize their health is in jeopardy.

    This is the main finding of a new study that looked at how extreme heat affects outdoor workers' health in Las Vegas, Los A...

    Pollution Killed 9 Million People Worldwide in 2019

    Pollution from varied sources caused 9 million deaths worldwide in 2019, accounting for 1 in 6 of all deaths, a new study says.

    Of those pollution-related deaths, three-quarters -- close to 7 million -- were caused by outdoor or indoor air pollution. Toxic chemical pollution (including lead) caused 1.8...

    Cutting Pollution From Power Plants, Transport Could Save 50,000 U.S. Lives Each Year

    More than 50,000 premature deaths would be prevented in the United States each year if fine particle air pollution from the burning of fossil fuels were eliminated, researchers say.

    Curbing this source of pollution would also save more than $600 billion a year in health care costs due to related illness and death, their

  • By Robert Preidt HealthDay Reporter
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  • May 17, 2022
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  • Wildfire Survivors Could Face Higher Cancer Risk

    Wildfires, like the one currently raging in New Mexico, are known to cause upticks in breathing issues and heart attacks in their immediate wake for folks who live nearby.

    Now, new Canadian research shows that these fires may also increase risk for lung and brain cancer o...

    Are 'Climate-Friendly' Options on Restaurant Menus Coming Soon?

    Is there a way to make eating out more environmentally friendly? A team of German researchers thinks the answer is a bright green yes.

    They'd like restaurants to offer menus that clearly label the environmental impact -- or "

    Pregnant American Women Are Facing Higher Exposures to Chemicals

    Exposure to potentially harmful chemicals is on the rise among pregnant women in the United States, a new study warns.

    "This is the first time we've been able to measure the amounts of chemicals in such a large and diverse group of pregnant women - not just identify chemicals," ...

    What Long Periods in Space Do to Astronauts' Brains

    Scientists have unearthed new details about how astronauts' brains are affected by extended trips in space.

    "These findings have important implications as we continue space exploration," said study co-author Dr. Juan Piantino. He is an assistant professor of pediatrics (neurology) at Oregon Health & Science University School of Medicine, in Portland. "It also forces you to think about som...

    City Rats May Not Pose Big Pandemic Threat

    Despite what you may have heard, rats and other city wildlife aren't likely to trigger future pandemics in people, according to a new study.

    The COVID-19 pandemic has scientists trying to determine where future outbreaks are most likely to start. It's long been suspected that critters in cities might act as reservoirs for viruses that could cause outbreaks in humans.

    An internationa...

    Your Take-Out Coffee Cup May Shed Trillions of Plastic 'Nanoparticles'

    Maybe you ask the barista for cream with your coffee, and possibly sugar as well.

    But new research shows that paper cup of joe you grab off the coffeehouse counter contains another ingredient, and it's one you might not care for - trillions of tiny plastic particles that leach into your hot java from...

    Dangerous Germs Floating on Microplastics in Ocean Wind Up in Food, Water

    Land parasites that pose a risk to human and wildlife health can hitch rides on the millions of pounds of microplastics that float between oceans, a new study shows.

    "It's easy for people to dismiss plastic problems as something that doesn't matter for them, like, 'I'm not a turtle in the ocean; I won't c...

    Climate Change Will Make Pandemics Like COVID More Likely: Report

    Planet Earth is growing hotter, forcing different animal species to migrate to new areas and interact with other unfamiliar creatures at an increasing rate.

    That phenomenon could have dire consequences to human health, a new study says, raising the odds for new viral illnesses such

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • April 28, 2022
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  • COVID Deaths Cluster in Poorly Vaccinated Communities

    COVID-19 death rates are significantly higher in U.S. counties that remain largely unvaccinated than in those where more people have gotten their shots, according to a new study.

    The findings add to evidence that vaccination ...

    Worsening Allergy Seasons: Is Climate Change to Blame?

    Scientists have long known that as the Earth warms due to climate change, plants produce more pollen, making allergy season longer and more pronounced.

    Now, a new survey finds that hay fever sufferers are increasingly taking notice.

    In a poll of more than 2,000 U.S. adults conducted by the Harris Poll in partnership with HealthDay, only 1 in 3 reported receiving an official...

    Sharp Spike Seen in Air Pollution Levels in Recent Years

    After 23 years of decreases in overall air pollution levels, a new report shows that the United States recorded the highest ever number of "very unhealthy" and "hazardous" air quality days between 2018 and 2020.

    In its State of the Air 2022 report, the American Lung Association said more than 137 million Americans reside in counties with unhealthy air, and the number of people who faced i...

    Western Wildfires Fueling Air Pollution During Summer Months

    Larger and more intense wildfires in the U.S. Pacific Northwest are causing a spike in air pollution across North America that endangers millions of people, a new study warns.

    Wildfire smoke has been linked to significant

  • By Robert Preidt HealthDay Reporter
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  • April 21, 2022
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  • Microplastics Found in Mussels That Humans Eat

    When you eat mussels or other seafood, you might also be getting a serving of microplastics, a new study suggests.

    Demonstrating that plastic trash is everywhere, researchers discovered microplastics from plastic pollution in edible blue mussels from 10 of southern Australia's most popular and more remote...

    Lead Exposure Harms Kids in Many Ways

    New studies add to the extensive body of research showing the many risks that lead poses to youngsters.

    The association between lead exposure and children's IQ is well-documented, but these Univers...

    Humans Bear Blame for Red Tides

    Red tide is a scourge of Southwest Florida, often littering beaches with dead fish and marine life and disrupting plans for boating and bathing.

    But Mother Nature isn't entirely to blame for this blight.

    A new study confirms what some have long suspected - that human activity helps sustain and intensify naturally occurring

    Two-Thirds of U.S. Water Systems Contain Uranium

    Two-thirds of U.S. community water systems have detectable levels of uranium, and the highest levels are in Hispanic communities, according to a new study.

    "Previous studies have found associations between chronic uranium exposure and increased risk of hypertension, cardiovascular disease, kidney damage and lung cancer at high levels of exposure," said researcher Anne Nigra, assistan...

    EPA Proposes to Ban Last Form of Asbestos Used in U.S.

    A proposed rule to ban ongoing uses of the only known form of asbestos imported into the United States has been introduced by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

    The ban would apply to chrysotile asbestos, which is known to cause cancer and is found in products like asbestos diaphragms, sheet gaske...

    99% of Planet's Population Breathes Dirty Air: WHO

    Almost no one in the world is breathing good air, according to a new World Health Organization report, which issued a call for reducing the use of fossil fuels.

    Air quality is the worst in WHO's Eastern Mediterranean and Southeast Asia regions, but 99% of the global population breathes air that exceeds ai...

    Want a Healthier Neighborhood? Plant a Tree

    It turns out that trees might be good medicine.

    How so? New research shows that having lots of trees in your neighborhood could improve your health and lower your medical costs.

    "It's time to stop looking at trees simply as an amenity and start recognizing the essential services they provide," said study author Ming Kuo, director of the Landscape and Human Health Lab the University ...

    Good Sense of Direction? Where You Grew Up Is Key

    Your ability to find your way around may be influenced by your childhood surroundings.

    Researchers in the United Kingdom and France have discovered that people raised in the country or suburbs are better navigators than those who grew up in cities, particularly those with grid-pattern streets.

    The study included nearly 400,000 people in 38 countries who played a mobile game called <...

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