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19 Oct

Online Sexual Abuse of Kids Is Common, New Study Finds

Researchers say a considerable number of children have been victims of online sexual abuse and the perpetrators are most often NOT strangers.

18 Aug

Allergy Info on YouTube Is Often Misleading, New Study Finds

More than one third of hay fever videos on YouTube contain misinformation, researchers say.

Health News Results - 242

Buying Testosterone on the Internet Comes With Dangers: Study

With more American men turning to testosterone therapy as a way to boost energy levels, build muscle and tackle erectile dysfunction, it’s no wonder that web-based merchants have stepped into the breach, seeking to grab market share away from doctors and pharmacies.

But are online testosterone purchases safe? No, a new investigation warns.

The conclusion follows an anonymous ...

1 in 10 Teens Have Sexted, Many See Porn by 6th Grade: Study

A high number of preteens and teens in the United States have viewed pornography and many have also sent or received nude or seminude photos -- sexting -- over their smartphones, a new study reveals.

“The prevalence rates we found in this study suggest that school counselors must be prepared to talk about sexting and pornography use with students, and to change the narrative about the...

Using an Online Pharmacy to Buy Meds? It's Buyer Beware, FDA Says

It might be tempting to buy prescription medication online, but buyers should beware, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration warns.

While some pharmacy websites operate legally and can offer convenience, privacy and lower costs, others may be selling unapproved, counterfeit and unsafe medications, the

  • Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • November 18, 2022
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  • Telemedicine's Popularity Has Risen During Pandemic

    Telemedicine became widespread during the pandemic, and that may have shifted patient views about using technology as way to communicate with their doctors, a new study suggests.

    Certain groups, including Black patients and those with lower education levels, became especially more apt to use it.

    "Our findings suggest that more Americans are becoming comfortable with telehealth and u...

    How the Pandemic Affected Americans' Blood Pressure

    Although blood pressure levels among Americans rose during the COVID-19 pandemic, new research suggests things could have been far worse.

    "We expected blood pressure control to be worse due to decreased physical activity, stress, poor sleep and other cardiovascular disease risk factors that worsened during the pandemic," said study leader

  • Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • November 3, 2022
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  • New TikTok Trend of Mouth Taping During Sleep Carries Dangers

    A new trend promoted on the social media platform TikTok has people taping their lips shut at bedtime -- a practice that could be dangerous, an expert warns.

    The purpose of mouth taping is to keep from breathing through your mouth at night.

    "If you have obstructive sleep apnea, yes, this can be very dangerous," sleep specialist Dr. Raj Dasgupta told CNN.

    "There is lim...

    Video Games May Bring Cognitive Benefits to Kids: Study

    School-age kids who spend hours a day playing video games may outperform their peers on certain tests of mental agility, a new study suggests.

    Researchers found that compared with children who never played video games, those who regularly spent hours gaming had higher scores on two standard cognitive tests: one measuring short-term memory and another gauging impulse control.

    Experts...

    Online Sexual Abuse of Kids Is Common; Perps Usually Friends, Partners

    Substantial numbers of kids and teens are being tracked, lured and sexually abused online, and adult strangers aren't always the perps.

    In many cases, it's friends and dating partners who are doing the grooming, a new study shows.

    The prevailing image of online sexual abuse is an older predator ...

    Telehealth Boosts Odds That Patients Show Up for Post-Surgery Care

    Telehealth became a common way for doctors to see patients during the early days of the pandemic.

    New research suggests that surgical patients offered virtual care are far more likely to keep appointments before and after their operation than those who rely on in-per...

    Most Docs Want Telehealth for Opioid Abuse Treatment to Stick Around

    Many doctors who used telehealth to treat patients with opioid addiction because of the COVID-19 pandemic would like to make it a permanent part of their practice.

    A new study from Yale School of Public Health surveyed more than 1,100 physicians who treated opioid-use disorder patients via telehealth.

    Researchers found that 6 out of every 7 physicians were in favor of making this ...

    Patient Care Delayed at Large Hospital Chain After Ransomware Attack

    A ransomware attack at one of the country's largest hospital chains disrupted care at hospitals from Seattle to Tennessee last week.

    The attack on CommonSpirit Health, the

  • By Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • October 10, 2022
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  • Instagram 'Post-Baby' Body Shots Don't Reflect Average Women, Study Finds

    Millions of women routinely check Instagram after giving birth, only to see posts by other new moms showing off how fast they got back into svelte shape.

    Of course, photos like those can be a real downer for women who don't have the time or resources to lose pregnancy weight...

    One App Is Especially Bad for Teens' Sleep

    Many teens look at screens at bedtime, but some apps are more likely to keep them awake than others, leading to sleep problems.

    That's the upshot of a new study in which researchers found YouTube fans experienced consistent and negative effects on sleep. Surprisingly, traditional TV was associated with earlier bedtim...

    Telemedicine Diagnoses Match Those of In-Person Doctor Visits Most of the Time

    With online medical visits growing in popularity, a new study offers some reassurance: Diagnoses made via video are usually on the money.

    Mayo Clinic researchers found that of preliminary diagnoses made during video appointments at their centers, 87% were later confirmed during in-person visits.

    The caveat is, the accuracy varied somewhat according to the type of medical condition: ...

    Used During Pandemic, Telehealth Lowered U.S. Opioid Overdoses

    Telehealth flourished during the pandemic, and now a new study shows it saved lives: The practice meant more people struggling with opioid addiction stayed in treatment longer and thereby lowered their risk of dying from an overdose.

    For the study, researcher...

    'Digital Self-Harm': When Teens Cyberbully Themselves

    Up to 9% of American teens say they've engaged in what's known as "digital self-harm" -- anonymously posting negative comments about themselves on social media.

    As is the case with acts of physical self-harm such as cutting, this "virtual" self-harm is associated with a higher risk for thinking about or attempting suicide, according to a startling

  • Alan Mozes HealthDay Reporter
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  • September 2, 2022
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  • Many Teens Easily Fooled by Fake Online Health Messages

    Many teenagers have a hard time discerning between accurate health messages and “fake news," a new study finds.

    Presented with a choice between fake and true health messages, about two in five teenagers considered both messages equally trustworthy, researchers found...

    Too Much TV Time May Really Harm Your Brain

    Older adults who get a lot of "screen time" may have an increased risk of developing dementia — but a lot depends on what type of screen they use, a new study suggests.

    Researchers found that among older British adults, those w...

    'Virtual' Museum Visits Are Good Medicine for Seniors

    By combining technology with interactive art activities, older people at home can have museums come to them -- and this can support their physical, mental and social well-being, a new study reports.

    "This participatory art-based activity could become a model that could be offered in museums and arts institutions worldwide to promote active and healthy aging," said lead author Dr. Olivier...

    Looking for Reliable Hay Fever Advice? It's Probably Not on YouTube

    Need information about hay fever? Steer clear of YouTube, a new study advises.

    Researchers found misinformation about allergic rhinitis, the medical name for the disorder, in a large numbers of posts on the popular video-sharing site.

    That's significant, because 7 in 10 patients wi...

    Skip the Texts: Face-to-Face Meetings Make College Students Happier

    In a world where everyone spends more and more time with eyes fixed on their phones, new research suggests young people feel happier after socializing with friends in person rather than virtually.

    The conclusion is an outgrowth of nearly four years spent analyzing how social habits of more than 3,000 college students affected their state of mind.

    "The findings of

  • Alan Mozes HealthDay Reporter
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  • August 4, 2022
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  • Telehealth, Phone Visits a Lifesaver for Veterans Addicted to Opioids

    There are many obstacles to opioid addiction treatment, but a new study shows one that one outgrowth of the COVID pandemic -- telehealth -- is enabling more U.S. veterans to get help.

    Researchers examined care given to vets before and after a transition to telehealth visits in early 2020 for treatment of their opioid use disorder. Telehealth for patients receiving the prescription drug

    Telehealth Visits Can Boost Prenatal, Maternal Care

    Seeing their doctors via telehealth instead of in person during the COVID-19 pandemic appears to have been as good, and sometimes even better, for pregnant women and new moms.

    Researchers from Oregon Health & Science University reviewed 28 randomized clinical trials and 14 observational studies that included more than 44,000 women. The goal was to determine the effectiveness and any harms...

    Facebook, Instagram Take Down Posts Offering Abortion Pills

    Facebook and Instagram have started taking down posts that offer abortion pills to women who may not be able to get them after the Supreme Court's reversal of Roe v. Wade.

    These posts told women how to get

  • By Steven Reinberg HealthDay Reporter
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  • June 28, 2022
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  • Want Reliable Diet Advice? Don't Head to TikTok

    A new study warns that the social media giant TikTok is filled with confusing and wrong information about the heart-healthy, plant-based approach to eating dubbed the Mediterranean diet.

    For the study, researchers analyzed 200 videos posted to the platform last August. They were the first to pop up on a search for content tagged #mediterraneandiet. By definition, that tag, or label, sugge...

    Telemedicine Could Really Help People Battling Advanced Cancers

    As a bill that would expand Medicare coverage for telehealth services makes its way through the U.S. Senate, a new study of people with advanced cancer suggests the practice could improve the lives of patients.

    The use of telehealth skyrocketed during the pandemic: A U.S. Health and Human Services ...

    Is Telemedicine Closing the 'Race Gap' in Primary Care?

    Here's one way in which the pandemic did not exacerbate health care disparities: A new study shows that telemedicine has closed the gap in access to primary care between Black and non-Black Americans.

    The use of telemedicine boomed during the pandemic, so University ...

    Week Off Social Media Boosts Mental Health: Study

    It's no secret that too much social media can be bad for one's mental health. Now, research suggests that taking even a brief break from TikTok, Facebook, Instagram and Twitter can ease symptoms of depression and

  • Steven Reinberg HealthDay Reporter
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  • May 11, 2022
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  • Misinformation on Cancer Nutrition Abounds on Pinterest: Study

    About one-third of cancer nutrition information on the social media site Pinterest is misleading and posted by businesses trying to sell products, according to a new study.

    "Our results revealed a significant amount of misinformation about cancer and nutrition," said study co-author Tracy Crane, an assoc...

    Teens on TikTok: Fun, But Addictive and Maybe Harmful

    In the fall of 2021, TikTok announced a major milestone to coincide with its fifth anniversary: The amassing of roughly 1 billion global users, many of them young, turning to the app every month as a way to view, make and share bite-sized videos.

    But what exactly do those young users think of the app? Is it a boon to their self-esteem and creativity, or an addictive time-waster that crea...

    Do Zoom Meetings Kill Creativity?

    Zoom meetings became the lifeblood of many workplaces during pandemic, but a new study points to a downside: They may limit employees' capacity for creative thinking.

    In experiments with workers in several countries, researchers found two broad phenomenon: Coworkers te...

    Virtual Learning Didn't Slow Preschoolers' Reading Skills

    Preschoolers can learn reading skills in a virtual classroom, University of Washington researchers say.

    "Children are ready to learn to read at the age of 5. But the pandemic robbed children of the opportunity for in-person reading instruction," said Patricia Kuhl, co-director of the Institute for Learning & Brain Sciences (I-LABS), in Seattle. "What we've shown here is that an online rea...

    Computer Helps 'Locked-In' ALS Patients Communicate, Shop Online

    A handful of "locked-in" amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients can now work a laptop computer using their brain waves, thanks to an implant lodged in a major vein inside their skull.

    The implant - a stent lined with 16 miniscule electrodes - is nestled in a vein located near the motor cortex of complete...

    Could Russian Hackers Cripple U.S. Health Care Systems?

    FRIDAY, March 11, 2022 -- Sick people seeking lifesaving care in the United States could fall victim to a hidden part of Russia's war on Ukraine -- vicious cyberattacks aimed at sowing disruption, confusion and chaos as ground forces advance.

    Cybersecurity experts warn that attacks launched against Ukrainian institutions have the potential to spill over into America's health care systems,...

    Are Health Care Apps in Your Future?

    Are you managing a chronic health problem, be it obesity or diabetes or heart disease or asthma?

    There's likely an app for that.

    Health apps are becoming more and more sophisticated, offering smartphone users help in dealing with chronic ailments, said Dr. David Bates, chief of internal med...

    Telemedicine Helped Many MS Patients During Pandemic

    Telemedicine was widely used by Americans with multiple sclerosis (MS) during the pandemic, and many were happy with the results, a new study finds.

    "The findings suggest that telehealth services were well liked during the pandemic. Because many individuals with MS have physical disability that may make travel more difficult, tempo...

    Are Cancer Patients More Apt to Believe COVID Lies?

    Misinformation about COVID-19 abounds, and cancer patients who are currently receiving treatment are more likely to believe COVID lies than cancer survivors who've completed treatment and people who've never had cancer, a new study says.

    The findings are from a survey of nearly 900 U.S. adults about evenly divided into the three groups.

    "These findings help us better understand the ...

    Crowdfunding for Medical Costs Almost Always Fails

    You have almost certainly seen the pleas while scrolling through social media: Called crowdfunding, folks try to raise money to pay for their sick loved one's mounting medical bills.

    But new research shows these grassroots campaigns rarely raise enough money to make a difference.

    According to GoFundMe, which corner...

    U.S. Teens Were Already in Mental Health Crisis Before Pandemic Hit

    MONDAY, Jan. 24, 2022 (HealthDay Now) -- Alaina Stanisci has grappled with an eating disorder since she was 10, and the disruptions of the pandemic only made things worse for the high school senior.

    "I actually experienced a relapse at the beginning of the pandemic because of this lack of structure," Stanisci, 18, of Mountain Lakes, N.J., said during a HealthDay Now interview. "D...

    Binge-Watching Could Raise Your Blood Clot Risk

    Who hasn't started to watch a new drama series on TV, and suddenly realize that hours have slipped by as they binged on one episode after the next?

    Now, a new study suggests that too much binge-watching may raise the risk of life-threatening blood clots in the legs or lungs by 35%.

    "Prolonged TV viewing, which involves immobilization, may increase the risk of venous thromboembolism,...

    Ordering Groceries Online? Good Luck Finding Nutrition Info

    Online grocery shopping has skyrocketed during the pandemic, but many websites are making it hard to find nutrition information on products, a new study shows.

    In the United States, packaged foods are required to have a nutrition facts label, ingredients list and w...

    Celebrities' Social Media Promotes Junk Food, Often for Free

    Images of people eating and drinking are a staple of social media, but new research finds such posts from celebrities often puts the spotlight squarely on junk food.

    Profit isn't always the reason why, investigators found: Celebrities often highlight unhealthy food favorites without getting paid for it.

    "Ninety-five percent of photos that contain foods and beverages on celebrities' ...

    Zoom Meeting Anxiety Doesn't Strike Everyone

    The pandemic has made Zoom meetings a daily reality for millions. For many, having to watch their own face in a meeting is the worst part.

    But that's not true for everyone, new research shows.

    "Most people believe that seeing yourself during virtual meetings contributes to making the overall experience worse, but that's not what showed up in my data," said study author Kristine Kuh...

    Telemedicine as Good as In-Person for Many Health Conditions: Review

    Chatting with your doctor via video about your health issues works just as well as an in-person office visit, at least when it comes to managing chronic illnesses, a new review suggests.

    Replacing office visits with video checkups delivered results that were just as effective for patients being treated for conditions like diabetes, respiratory illnesses, chronic pain, heart problems and n...

    Parents Underestimate How Much Time Teens Spent Online During Pandemic

    Parents, think you have a good handle on how much time your teens are spending on social media?

    Don't bet on it. New research suggests your best guesstimate is likely way off.

    Parents significantly underestimated their teens' social media use -- especially girls' -- during the first year of the COVID-19 pandemic, the study showed.

    "Although most parents and their teens spent ...

    'You Didn't Tag Me!' Instagram Snubs Hurt, Study Confirms

    Think what happens online stays online? Think again.

    According to new research, a social media diss can leave people feeling genuinely hurt and ostracized.

    "Social media ostracism means being excluded or ignored online on social media networks like Instagram, Facebook or Twitter," explained lead study author Christiane Büttner. She's a PhD candidate in the department of social psy...

    Junk Food Ads Reaching Kids Through Livestream Gaming Platforms

    Children and teens who use livestreaming gaming platforms may be bombarded with influencer-endorsed ads for energy drinks, junk food and alcohol, new research shows.

    "This type of marketing can normalize high-fat, high-sugar and high-sodium foods at a time in young viewers' live...

    Online Programs, Phone Apps Can Help Treat Depression

    People with depression symptoms might find some help from online programs or smartphone apps -- but the human component remains key, a new research review suggests.

    Not everyone with depression can readily get to face-to-face therapy -- whether due to time, distance, money or stigma. But smartphones are n...

    Many Kids, Teens Think Girls Don't Care About Computer Science

    The misconception that girls are less interested than boys in computer science and engineering begins at a young age in the United States.

    And it's one reason for the gender gap in those career fields, according to a new study.

    In surveys of more than 2,200 U.S. children and teens in grades 1 through 12, researchers found that half -- 51% -- believed girls are less...

    Social Media Tied to Higher Risk of Depression

    The latest in a spate of studies investigating links between use of social media and depression suggests the two go hand in hand.

    "The relationship between social media and mental health has been the subject of a lot of debate," said Dr. Roy Perlis, lead author of the new study. He's director of the Center for Experimental Drugs and Diagnostics at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston....

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