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Melanoma Patients Who Fail Standard Meds May Have Another Option

An experimental therapy that uses the body's own immune system cells may beat a standard treatment for patients with advanced melanoma, a new clinical trial finds.

Researchers found that the therapy doubled the amount of time melanoma patients lived without their skin cancer progressing, versus a long-used drug called ipilimumab (Yervoy).

The approach, called tumor-infiltrating...

Certain Melanoma Patients May Have Better Outcomes

While melanoma remains the most deadly type of skin cancer, new research has found that a subset of patients with early disease are at very low risk of dying.

These particular patients may not face the same prognosis that is typically associated with melanoma, and they may potentially represent cases contributing to over-diagnosis.

The findings were published online Nov. 7 in C...

Khloe Kardashian Has 'Incredibly Rare' Tumor Removed From Her Face

Celebrity Khloe Kardashian announced Tuesday that she had survived a second bout of skin cancer, this time on her face.

Kardashian said her “incredibly rare” tumor was removed by Beverly Hills surgeon Dr. Garth Fisher after the reality TV star noticed a bump that wouldn't go away.

"I deci...

Football Great Terry Bradshaw Describes Battle Against Two Kinds of Cancer

Football Hall of Famer Terry Bradshaw revealed Sunday that he has been treated for two different types of cancer in the past year.

Bradshaw talked about his health while co-hosting Fox NFL Sunday.

“Last week on ...

New Treatment Approach Boosts Odds Against 2 Types of Skin Cancer

Skin cancer patients appear to fare better if they receive immunotherapy before their cancers are surgically removed, a pair of clinical trials show.

In fact, some do so well that their immune system essentially dissolves their tumors, potentially removing the need...

Banana Boat Sunscreen Recalled Due to Benzene

Edgewell Personal Care Co. has recalled three batches of its Banana Boat Hair & Scalp Sunscreen Spray SPF 30 because trace levels of benzene were found in some samples during an internal review.

Benzene is a human carcinogen. Exposure can happen through inhalation, orally or through the skin, potentiall...

Many Gen Z Americans Have Sun Safety All Wrong

You might think everyone knows by now to protect against the sun's rays, but many Gen Zers apparently haven't gotten the message.

In a recent survey of 1,000 U.S. adults by the American Academy of Dermatology, many of these 18- to 25-year-olds were unaware of the risks from tanning.

About 60% of Gen Z respondents sai...

Eat Lots of Fish? Your Melanoma Risk May Rise

You've added fish to your diet to eat healthy, but now a new study delivers some bad news: Fish lovers may have a slightly increased risk of melanoma.

Researchers followed over 490,000 older Americans and found the 20% wit...

Veterans at Higher Risk of Deadly Skin Cancers

U.S. veterans are at higher risk for melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer, than most Americans, and new research finds they are also more likely to have advanced-stage disease when it's detected.

At the time of diagnosis, "we found veterans with melanoma were more like...

Skin Biopsy? Here Are Tips on Wound Care

A skin biopsy is often used to diagnose skin cancer and other skin conditions.

It involves the removal of a small amount of skin, which is examined under a microscope. Afterwards, you'll need to look after the biopsy location to make sure it heals properly.

"Your dermatologist will treat the small wound fro...

Newer Sunscreens Can Better Match Your Skin Tone

Newer sunscreens that can match your skin tone may encourage more people to use sunscreen, an expert says.

"The lighter a person's skin, the higher their risk for skin cancer," said Dr. Henry Lim, former chair of dermatology at Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit. "While people with darker skin have a lower risk for s...

People With Scars Are Their Own Toughest Critics: Study

Scars from facial surgery look worse to skin cancer patients themselves than to others, so it's important for surgeons to prepare patients beforehand, researchers say.

Doctors can help by outlining the healing process and explaining what their scars will look like in the weeks after surgery, the study authors suggested.

"Our research seems to support the saying 'we are our own worst...

Cancer Patients May Be at Higher Odds for Rare Neurological Disorder

People with cancer may be at increased risk for a rare neurological disorder called Guillain-Barré syndrome, new research has found.

"Previous studies have suggested there may be a link between cancer and Guillain-Barré syndrome, but just how often people develop

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  • March 3, 2022
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  • Women at Higher Odds for Side Effects From Some Cancer Treatments

    Gender differences extend to cancer treatments, with women having a higher risk of severe side effects from certain treatments than men, a new study finds.

    Previous research concluded women tend to have more side effects from chemotherapy, and this new paper shows the same is true for

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  • February 15, 2022
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  • Drug Combo Boosts Outcomes for Advanced Melanoma

    For people newly diagnosed with advanced melanoma, a combination of two immunotherapy drugs can double the amount of time their cancer remains progression-free, a clinical trial has found.

    The treatment combines two drugs known as immune checkpoint inhibitors. One, called nivolumab (Opdivo), is already standard for advanced melanoma; the other, relatlimab, is not yet approved.

    But b...

    Could a High-Fiber Diet Help Boost Cancer Survival?

    People undergoing immune-boosting therapy for advanced melanoma may respond better if they eat a high-fiber diet, a new study hints.

    Researchers said much more study is needed, but their initial findings -- in both melanoma patients and lab mice -- suggest that

    Do Immune-Based Cancer Drugs Work Better in Men?

    Women are two times more likely than men to die after receiving a combination of cancer immunotherapy drugs called checkpoint inhibitors, but it's not clear if that difference is due to side effects or because the treatment isn't working, researchers say.

    This new class of highly targeted drugs -- which includes pembrolizumab (Keytruda), nivolumab (Opdivo) or ipilimumab (Yervoy) -- has re...

    A Routine Skin Check Could Save Your Life

    It may sound dramatic, but skin checks save lives.

    While encouraging people to do routine self-exams, the American Academy of Dermatology (AAD) shares some case studies that led to important discoveries.

    Richard Danzer, of West Palm Beach, Fla., found a large, painful cyst on his back during a skin self-exam. Dermatologist Dr. Brittany Smirnov examined him, and he was later diagnose...

    Protecting Your Skin From Sun Won't Weaken Your Bones: Study

    Most people know that sun-sourced vitamin D is good for their bones. So could avoiding the sun to reduce skin cancer risk weaken your bones?

    A new study brings a reassuring answer: "Sun-protective" behavior -- wearing long sleeves, seeking shade or using sunscreen -- "was not associated with decreased bone mineral density or increased risk of osteoporotic fracture," the researchers conclu...

    Drug Used to Prevent Miscarriage May Raise Lifetime Cancer Risk in Offspring

    People who were exposed to a particular hormonal medication in the womb may have a heightened risk of cancer later in life, a new study suggests.

    Researchers found the increased cancer risk among adults whose mothers had been given injections of a synthetic progesterone known as 17-OHPC, or 17P, during pregnancy. The study participants were born in the 1960s, when the drug was used to hel...

    Why Skin Cancer Checks Are Even More Important for Hispanic People

    When Hispanic people get a skin cancer diagnosis, their tumors are about 17% larger than those of white people, researchers say.

    According to the American Academy of Dermatology (AAD), skin cancer is often diagnosed at a more advanced stage in people with black and brown skin, leading to worse results. This makes it especially important to know the signs of skin cancer.

    "Patients an...

    Don't Forget to Apply Sunscreen Before & After Water Fun

    If you're at the beach or pool, applying sunscreen before and after you've been in the water is a must, a cancer specialist says.

    The intensity of exposure to harmful ultraviolet (UV) rays "is higher under water than it is above water," said Dr. Arun Mavanur. He is a surgical oncologist at the Alvin & Lois Lapidus Cancer Institute at LifeBridge Health, in Baltimore.

    "UV rays also ar...

    Spotting the Signs of Deadly Melanoma Skin Cancers

    Regular skin checks to look for signs of melanoma could save your life.

    Self-exams for the deadliest type of skin cancer should be done at least once a month in a well-lit room in front of a full-length mirror and also with a hand mirror for hard-to-see areas, said Dr. Arun Mavanur, a surgical oncologist.

    You also need to get checked by a doctor if you have risk factors for melanoma...

    One Key Question Can Help Spot Skin Cancer

    When a suspicious skin lesion sends you scurrying to a dermatologist, asking for a full-body skin check could save your life.

    Dermatologists are twice as likely to find skin cancer with a full-body check, a new study reveals. More than half of the skin cancers discovered were not in the location the patient was concerned about.

    "If the dermatologist did not check their entire body,...

    New Drug Might Be Non-Surgical Option for Common Skin Cancers

    An experimental gel has shown early promise in treating the most common form of skin cancer -- hinting at a potential alternative to surgery in the future.

    Researchers tested the gel in 30 patients with basal cell carcinoma (BCC), a skin cancer diagnosed in more than 3 million Americans each year. The tumors rarely spread and are highly curable, usually through surgical removal.

    Eve...

    Take This Refresher on Skin Safety in Summer Sun

    Sun protection is essential as you enjoy the outdoors this summer, a skin expert stresses.

    "Skin cancer is the most common cancer in humans so it's important that we do what we can to protect ourselves," Dr. Ida Orengo, a professor of dermatology at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, said in a school news release.

    Here are some of her tips:

    • Wear a sunscreen with SPF ...

    U.S. Deaths From Cancer Continue to Decline

    Americans' overall death rate from cancer continues to fall -- but rising rates of certain cancers and ongoing racial disparities linger.

    Those are among the findings of an annual report to the nation from several major cancer organizations.

    The good news includes an accelerating decline in the overall cancer death rate, among both women and men, and across racial and ethnic groups....

    Shining a Light on Sunscreens

    Sunscreen isn't just for pool gatherings and beach outings: Using sunscreen every day could reduce your risk of skin cancer, experts say.

    Daily use of at least an SPF 15 sunscreen can lower your risk of melanoma -- the deadliest type of skin cancer -- by 50%, according to the Skin Cancer Foundation.

    If you spend most of your day indoors, SPF 15 should provide adequate protection, bu...

    Many 'High-Risk' Americans Unconcerned About Skin Cancer: Poll

    It's long been known the sun's rays can cause skin cancer.

    But a new poll shows that only about 30% of American adults say they're concerned about developing skin cancer -- even though nearly 70% have at least one risk factor for the disease.

    The American Academy of Dermatology's survey found that 49% of respondents were more worried about avoiding sunburn than preventing skin cance...

    Many Americans Confused About Sunscreens: Poll

    Think you know all you need to know about slathering on the sunscreen this summer?

    Maybe you don't.

    As the Memorial Day weekend begins, many Americans are confused about the proper application of sunscreen and about its sun protection factor (SPF), the American Academy of Dermatology (AAD) says.

    A recent academy poll of 1,000 U.S. adults found that while 80% know they should a...

    Melanoma Can Strike Your Nails: Here's How to Check

    When checking your body for signs of skin cancer, don't overlook your nails.

    The American Academy of Dermatology (AAD) points out that skin cancer -- including melanoma, the deadliest type -- can develop under and around the fingernails and toenails. Though it's rare, it's more common in older people with darker skin.

    Risk factors include personal or family history of melanoma or na...

    Many Americans Wrong About Sun's Skin Cancer Dangers: Poll

    You might think everybody knows how to protect themselves from the sun's harmful rays, but a new survey reveals that one-third of Americans lack a basic understanding of sun safety and skin cancer.

    That's the surprising takeaway from an American Academy of Dermatology (AAD) survey of 1,000 U.S. adults.

    Fifty-three percent of respondents didn't realize shade offers protection from t...

    New Hope Against a Rare but Incurable Eye Cancer

    A cutting-edge experimental drug cuts nearly in half the risk of death among patients with a rare but aggressive cancer of the eye, new clinical trial data show.

    Tebentafusp has now become the first drug shown to improve overall survival in patients with uveal melanoma, said Dr. Antoni Ribas, immediate past president of the American Association of Cancer Research (AACR), in a

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • April 20, 2021
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  • Teen Tanning Bed Ban Would Prevent Thousands of U.S. Melanoma Cases

    A U.S.-wide ban on teen use of tanning beds would prevent thousands of cases of skin cancer and save millions in health care costs, researchers say.

    Indoor tanning has been linked to an increased risk of melanoma -- the deadliest type of skin cancer -- and the highest risk is among people who start using tanning beds at a young age. Despite that danger, many U.S. teens do.

    While ban...

    Could Widely Used Blood Pressure Meds Raise Skin Cancer Risk?

    Most people are familiar with common sun-protection advice, from wearing and reapplying sunscreen to putting on a hat.

    But a new Canadian study finds that for people who take certain blood pressure medications, that advice becomes even more critical because those drugs can increase their sensitivity to the sun's harmful ultraviolet (UV) rays.

    The researchers reviewed data for nearly...

    The Future of Cancer for Americans

    At first glance, it appears that little will change between now and 2040 when it comes to the types of cancers that people develop and that kill them, a new forecast shows.

    Breast, melanoma, lung and colon cancers are expected to be the most common types of cancers in the United States, and patients die most often from lung, pancreatic, liver and colorectal cancers, according to the lates...

    Obesity Tied to Shorter Survival in Cancer Patients

    Obesity may shorten the lives of patients with certain types of cancers, but not others, a new research review concludes.

    The analysis, of more than 200 studies, found that across numerous cancers, obesity was linked to shorter survival. The list included breast, colon, prostate, uterine and pancreatic cancers.

    On the other hand, patients with lung, kidney or melanoma skin cancer al...

    Most Dermatology Patients Like 'Telehealth' Visits: Survey

    A majority of dermatology patients are happy with telehealth appointments in place of in-person office visits, a new study finds.

    The COVID-19 pandemic has forced many medical specialties to move from in-person to online appointments, but dermatology had already seen increased use of telehealth visits over the last decade, according to the George Washington (GW) University researchers.

    Therapeutic Vaccine Is Keeping Melanoma in Remission 4 Years On

    Giving melanoma patients a "personalized" vaccine can prompt an anti-tumor immune response that lasts for years, an early study finds.

    The study involved just eight patients with advanced melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer.

    But it builds on earlier work showing it is possible to spur the immune system to respond to an individual's unique tumor.

    All eight patients unde...

    Even Winter Carries Skin Cancer Risks for College Students

    Researchers from two universities in Utah have a warning for students planning to hit the slopes or play in the snow without sunscreen: You could greatly increase your risk of skin cancer.

    A survey of students by Brigham Young University College of Nursing in Provo found that only 9% use sunscreen. They also found students' use of tanning beds surges in winter, especially among men.

    Could Tanning Raise a Woman's Odds for Endometriosis?

    Young women who regularly visit tanning salons may have an increased risk of developing endometriosis, a new study suggests.

    Researchers said the findings, from a large study of U.S. women, don't prove that tanning beds help cause the painful pelvic condition.

    But, they noted, the study might give women more incentive to avoid indoor tanning.

    Endometriosis is a condition in wh...

    DNA Analysis Might Reveal Melanoma Risk

    DNA mutations in skin cells may signal a risk for melanoma long before it's visible to the eye, a new study suggests.

    Exposure to sun damages skin and DNA, and this damage can be measured. Using a new method for analyzing DNA harm, researchers say they can estimate the risk of developing melanoma.

    "It turns out that a multitude of individual cells in so-called normal skin ...

    Almost 90,000 Young American Adults Will Get Cancer This Year: Report

    Nearly 90,000 Americans between 15 and 39 years of age will be diagnosed with cancer this year and more than 9,200 will die, a new report projects.

    One hematologist who deals with younger cancer patients said the shock of a diagnosis at this point in their lives can be overwhelming.

    "This population is unique, they're in the prime of their lives," said Dr. Tina Bhatnagar, w...

    No Link Found Between Blood Pressure Meds and Cancer: Study

    Blood pressure drugs don't increase the risk of cancer, according to the largest study to examine the issue.

    A possible link between blood pressure drugs and cancer has been the subject of debate for decades, but evidence has been inconsistent and conflicting.

    For this study, researchers analyzed data from 31 clinical trials of blood pressure drugs that involved 260,000 peop...

    Black Melanoma Patients Face Treatment Delays: Study

    Black Americans with melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer, wait longer for surgery than white patients, a new study finds.

    "We already knew that black patients with melanoma have a worse prognosis and that longer time to treatment is associated with worse survival, but we didn't fully understand the relationship between race and time to treatment after controlling for various o...

    Protect Yourself From Sun to Prevent Skin Cancer

    Headed to the beach or park for a little fresh air? Don't forget your sun protection, the American Academy of Dermatology (AAD) advises.

    Skin cancer is the most common cancer in the United States, affecting one in five Americans, but many don't protect themselves from harmful UV rays.

    Sixty percent of respondents to an AAD survey said they had had such a bad sunburn their ...

    As Summer Starts, Sun Safety Slashes Skin Cancer Risk

    With many beaches and parks opening in time for Memorial Day, the American Cancer Society is reminding people to practice sun safety.

    Overexposing yourself to the sun increases your risk for skin cancer, which is the most common cancer in the United States, with almost 5.5 million cases each year. That's more than breast, colon, lung and prostate cancers combined.

    "COVID-19 ...

    Don't Delay If Cancer Symptoms Appear - Call Your Doctor

    The coronavirus pandemic has many people putting off medical appointments, but if you have possible cancer symptoms, don't delay.

    A small lump in a breast, blood in your stool or an odd-looking mole, for example, should not be ignored, according to experts at Cedars-Sinai Health System in Los Angeles.

    "We're seeing a concerning trend that some cancer diagnoses are being de...

    Shun the Sun to Prevent Skin Cancer

    Though most Americans are well aware that protecting themselves from sunburn is important, many don't take precautions, a new survey finds.

    Protecting yourself from exposure to sunlight is the best way of preventing skin cancer, according to the American Academy of Dermatology (AAD).

    The results of the AAD survey show that 76% of Americans know the importance of sun pr...

    U.S. Sees Big Drop in Deaths From Melanoma

    New treatments for melanoma have dramatically reduced deaths from this often fatal skin cancer.

    Leaders of a new study report that the death rate from aggressive melanoma that spread to other organs plummeted 18% between 2013 and 2016, after jumping 7.5% between 1986 and 2013. The figures apply to white Americans, the group that accounts for nearly all cases of melanoma in th...