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Flu Shot Could Be a Lifesaver for Folks With Chronic Ills

The U.S. flu season is expected to extend into spring, and experts say it's not too late to get a flu shot.

Last year’s flu season was mild, but this season has already seen triple the number of flu-related deaths in the United States.

“Even a minor respiratory virus can be hard on someone with lung disease, and the flu is especially challenging,” said

  • Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 8, 2023
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  • Full Page
  • What Is Coronary Heart Disease?

    That seemingly sudden heart attack? It may have been triggered by underlying coronary heart disease.

    Heart attack is a big event, but for some it might be the first sign of a problem that has been building for quite some time.

    Coronary heart disease -- also known as coronary artery disease -- is the most common type of heart disease in the United States, according to the U.S. Cente...

    Do You Live in a 'Food Swamp'? It Could Be Raising Your Heart Risk

    Americans who live near a "food swamp" may have a higher risk of suffering a stroke, a preliminary study finds.

    A number of studies have looked at the health consequences of living in a so-called food desert -- areas with few grocery stores or other options for buying fresh food.

    Food swamps are different: The term was coined to describe communities where fast food restaurants, conv...

    Caring for Teeth, Gums May Safeguard Aging Brains

    Taking good care of your teeth -- brushing, flossing, regular dental checkups -- is, of course, important for good health. Now researchers say it's also vital for brain health.

    While it was already clear that poor dental health could increase stroke and heart disease risk, a new study funds that adults who are genetically prone to have cavities, dentures and missing teeth are also more li...

    Celiac Disease Could Raise Heart Risks, Study Finds

    People with celiac disease may be more likely to develop heart disease despite having fewer traditional heart risks than other folks.

    Celiac disease is an immune reaction that occurs when some people eat gluten, a protein found in wheat, barley and rye. The only treatment is following a strict gluten-free diet.

    People with celiac disease may be 27% more likely to develop heart disea...

    Heart Disease When Young Could Bring Memory Issues by Middle Age

    People who suffer a heart attack or stroke in middle age may develop memory and thinking problems earlier in life, too, a new study finds.

    The study, published online Jan. 25 in the journal Neurology, focused on people who had developed premature cardiovascular disease. That refers...

    40-Year Study Finds Weight-Loss Surgery Extending Life Spans

    WEDNESDAY, Jan. 25, 2023 (HealthDay News) – It’s well known that obesity fuels an increase in a person’s risk for other chronic health conditions.

    Now, a new study shows that weight-loss surgery could set that person’s health, and longevity, on a different path.

    Utah researchers who followed patients for up to 40 years...

    Expecting? Stay Heart-Healthy for You and Your Baby

    It's never too late for an expectant mom to adopt healthy habits for her baby and herself.

    The American Heart Association (AHA) offers some heart-healthy tips.

    "Pregnancy is often a pivotal time in a woman's life from both short- and long-term perspectives," said Dr. Michelle Albert...

    What Happens to Your Body When You Quit Smoking

    Giving up cigarettes can be excruciating, with cravings and withdrawal symptoms lingering for weeks, especially if you aren’t strongly motivated.

    Yet, just minutes after that first smoke-free breath, your body starts to change for the better. And with all the heal...

    Staying Hydrated Could Mean Less Disease, Slower Aging

    Could hydration hold the key to longevity?

    Maybe, suggests new research that discovered older adults who are properly hydrated may be healthier and live longer than those who aren't, having less incidence of conditions like heart and lung disease.

    "Staying well-hydrated may slow down aging, prevent or delay development of chronic diseases, and therefore prolong disease-free life," s...

    America's Doctors Offer Up Healthy Resolutions for 2023

    It's that time of year again, when people gather up their best intentions for living a healthier life and make New Year's resolutions.

    Luckily, the American Medical Association (AMA) has some suggestions on which pledges pack the most punch.

    Start by being more physically active. Adults should do at least 150 minutes a week of moderate-intensity activity or 75 minutes a week of vig...

    Black Patients More Likely to Get Riskier Heart Surgeries

    Insured Black patients are less likely to undergo minimally invasive heart valve replacement or repairs -- relatively safe procedures -- than their white counterparts, new research shows.

    Black patients who need a mitral valve replacement are more likely to have operations that involve opening the chest and cutting through the breastbone to reveal the heart, a

  • Steven Reinberg HealthDay Reporter
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  • December 28, 2022
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  • Full Page
  • Broken Hearts: Loneliness Could Raise Danger From Cardiovascular Disease

    For people with heart disease, new research suggests loneliness, social isolation and living alone can shave years off your life.

    This trio puts people with established cardiovascular disease at greater risk of premature death, according to the international study. Cardiovascular disease refers to heart disease and stroke.

    "Social health factors such as loneliness and social isolat...

    After Angioplasty, Depression Can Keep Heart Patients From Taking Meds

    Patients who undergo angioplasty and stenting to open clogged arteries in and around the heart should also be screened for depression, according to a new study.

    Researchers found that depressed patients were less likely than their mentally healthy peers to take their prescribed medications, including beta-blockers, antiplatelets and statins.

    These medications reduce the likelihood...

    Even Early-Stage Liver Disease May Be Harming the Heart

    Liver disease can affect heart health and that includes even early forms of the disease, a new study reveals.

    While it had previously been known that nonalcoholic fatty liver disease was associated with cardiovascular death, the relationship was poorly understood, said researcher Dr. Alan Kwan. He is a c...

    Vitamins, Fish Oil, Minerals: Which Supplements Help or Harm the Heart?

    Manufacturers make all kinds of health claims, but can taking a dietary supplement actually lower your heart disease risk?

    A comprehensive analysis of prior research suggests that in certain cases the answer is yes. Some types of supplements -- such as omega-3 fatty acids, folic acid and coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) -- do provide a cardiovascular leg up.

    But many supplements were found...

    Shingles Ups Odds of Stroke, Heart Attack By Almost 30%

    People who've had a bout of shingles may face a heightened risk of heart attack or stroke in later years, a new, large study suggests.

    Anyone who ever had chickenpox can develop shingles — a painful rash that is caused by a reactivation of the virus that causes chickenpox. About one-third of Americans will develop shingles in their lifetime, according to the U.S. Centers for Diseas...

    'How Can I Prevent Heart Disease?' Docs Give Different Answers to Men, Women

    Doctors give men and women different advice to head off heart disease, even though guidelines for both are the same.

    Men were 20% more likely to be prescribed statins to lower blood levels of bad cholesterol compared with women, a new study found.

    Women, meanwhile, were 27% more likely to be advised to lose weight or reduce their salt intake, and 38% more likely to receive recommen...

    Winter Holidays Are High Time for Heart Attacks: Protect Yourself

    The winter holidays are a time of celebrating and sharing precious time with family and friends, but they can also be deadly: More people die of heart attacks on Christmas Day than on any other day of the year.

    Experts aren't certain what's behind that troubling fact, but they offer some suggestions to help ensure that you and your loved ones aren't among them.

    "The holidays are a ...

    Black Patients Fare Worse Than White Patients After Angioplasty, Stents

    Black adults who undergo a common procedure to open up clogged arteries are readmitted to the hospital more often than their white peers. They're also more likely to die in the years after treatment, a new study finds.

    Researchers looked at how patients fared following balloon angioplasty and coronary stenting -- "one of the most common cardiovascular procedures performed in the U.S....

    Put Away That Salt Shaker to Shield Your Heart

    Toss out your salt shaker if you want to lower your risk of heart disease, a new study suggests.

    Even if you already follow a low-salt diet, sprinkling salt on your food can raise your risk for heart disease, heart failure and plaque in cardiac arteries, researchers report.

    "Compared with people who always added salt to foods -- usually at the table -- those who sometimes, rare...

    How Persistent Asthma Might Harm the Heart

    Persistent asthma may take a toll on the heart, not just the lungs, a new study suggests.

    When the respiratory condition is relentless, it appears tied to plaque in the carotid arteries, increasing the risk for heart attack and stroke, researchers say.

    The carotid arteries — large arteries on the sides of the neck — carry blood to the brain.

    In a study of more than ...

    Flakes Are Falling Again: Here's the Safe Way to Shovel Snow

    Shoveling snow is a strenuous workout that poses risks for people with heart conditions.

    “We have to think of shoveling snow as a pretty significant exertion, like an exercise,” said Dr. Donald Ford, chair of family medicine at the Cleveland Clinic, in Ohio. “So if you're go...

    HDL 'Good' Cholesterol's Role in Heart Health Under Scrutiny

    Blood levels of HDL, the famously "good" kind of cholesterol, may not make a big difference to heart health after all -- particularly for Black people, a large new study suggests.

    The study, of nearly 24,000 U.S. adults, found that low HDL levels were tied to a somewhat higher risk of heart attack among white people. That was not the case for Black adults, however.

    Meanwhile, high H...

    There's a Best Time of Day to Exercise for Women's Heart Health

    Regular exercise has long been hailed as a great way to preserve heart health, but could a morning workout deliver more benefits than an evening visit to the gym?

    New research suggests that for women in their 40s and up, the answer appears to be yes.

    “First of all, I would like to stress that being physically active or doing some sort of exercise is beneficial at any time of day,...

    Pandemic Saw Big Rise in Deaths to Millennials From Multiple Causes

    Americans aged 25 to 44 — so-called millennials — are dying at significantly higher rates from three leading killers than similarly aged people just 10 years ago, the latest government data shows.

    Looking at data collected between 2000 and 2020, the new report from the U.S. National Center for He...

    Doctor's Office Stress Test Could Gauge Your Heart Risk

    Evaluating a person's psychological stress can be a good way to gauge their risk of heart and blood vessel disease, new research suggests.

    And a brief questionnaire could help with the assessment, the study findings showed.

    “Our study is part of the accumulating evidence that psychological distress is a really important factor in a cardiovascular diagnosis, such as the other healt...

    Experimental Pill May Be New Way to Control Cholesterol

    Millions of people take daily medication to lower their cholesterol levels and prevent heart attacks, but there hasn't been a drug that targets a dangerous type of cholesterol in the blood known as lipoprotein(a), or Lp(a).

    That's why a new study of an investigational drug called olpasiran, which blocks the production of apolipoprotein(a) — a key component of Lp(a) — is generating a l...

    Is Surgery Always Necessary for Folks With Chronic Angina?

    Folks suffering chest pain from clogged arteries appear to have some true flexibility in choosing the medical care that's right for them, researchers report.

    That's because their overall risk of death is about the same whether they choose aggressive surgical treatment or a more conservative approach focused on medication and lifestyle changes, according to seven-year clinical trial result...

    Hormonal Therapy Won't Prevent Chronic Ills After Menopause: Expert Panel

    Experts are once again advising doctors and women against using menopausal hormone therapy to ward off chronic diseases -- 20 years after a landmark trial dashed those hopes.

    In updated recommendations, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) is reiterating its past advice on men...

    Heart's Electrical Signals Changed in First Pig-to-Human Cardiac Transplant

    Less than a year after the first-ever transplant of a pig heart into a human patient, doctors are reporting that the heart showed unexpected changes in its electrical system before the recipient ultimately died.

    The changes are not believed to have contributed to the patient's death. But experts said that the observation will help in preparing for any such transplants in the future.

    Vitamin D Could Help Extend Your Life: Study

    A vitamin D deficiency puts you at risk for more than just weakened bones, a major new study reports.

    Too little vitamin D in your system can increase your overall risk of premature death, as well as your specific risk of dying from cancer, heart disease or lung disease, acco...

    Black Americans Less Likely to Get Lifesaving Heart Treatments

    A person with advanced heart failure may often need a heart transplant or a mechanical heart pump to survive.

    But white patients are twice as likely as Black patients to get this critically important care, a new study finds, and racial bias may be the reason why.

    Good Sleep Could Keep Illness at Bay as You Age

    As men and women enter their golden years, those who regularly fail to get a good night's sleep face a higher risk for developing not one but two serious chronic illnesses at the same time, new research shows.

    Researchers from France, Finland and United Kingdom tracked the self-reported sleep routines and health status of nearly 8,000 Britons from ages 50 to 70.

    While the new analys...

    Common A-Fib Treatment May Be Riskier for Women

    While a common non-drug treatment called ablation exists for the heart rhythm disorder atrial fibrillation (a-fib), the procedure can be more problematic for women than for men.

    A-fib, a chaotic electrical pattern in the upper chambers of the heart, affects up to 20% of Americans during their lifetimes. It can b...

    Counting Steps? Here's How Many You Need to Boost Health

    Taking that often-cited 10,000 steps a day — or even slightly fewer — may indeed be enough to improve your health, a new study suggests.

    Researchers found that among 6,000 middle-aged and older adults, those who got at least 8,000 to 9,000 steps daily had reduced risks of developing an array of conditions over seven years. The list included obesity, high blood pressure, diabetes, slee...

    Your E-Bike Is No Match for Real Biking: Study

    That e-bike might make hilly rides a lot more fun, but it's not improving your fitness the way a good old-fashioned bicycle would, a new study shows.

    People riding e-bikes are 44% less likely to reach weekly targets for physical activity than those on regular bicycles, according to a re...

    When Is a Fracture Potentially Deadly for an Older Adult?

    Researchers studying fractures in older adults found a higher death rate when those fractures were closer to the center of the body and also when patients had particular underlying health issues.

    This information coul...

    Retirement Means Sleeping More, Exercising Less: Study

    Retirees, it's time to get up out of your easy chair and get moving.

    That's the message from a Finnish study that used a wrist-based device to determine just how much retired adults were moving every day.

    “Based on our research, people who are retiring should aim to increase the amou...

    More Americans With Heart Disease Are Also Becoming 'Food Insecure'

    Many Americans with heart disease also have limited access to food, and this dangerous combination is growing rapidly, a new study finds.

    "Food insecurity is a common problem...

    Attending Church Might Lengthen Black Men's Lives

    Places of worship may provide respite for Black men that not only enhances their lives, but may extend them, new research suggests.

    "Black men have been oppressed, commodified, surveilled and criminalized like no other group in U.S. history and they often experience disproportionately high levels of social and psychological stress from

  • By Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • September 30, 2022
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  • Full Page
  • Coffee Might Perk Up Your Heart and Life Span

    Folks who drink two or three cups of coffee daily appear to live longer than people who don't care for the beverage, new research shows.

    Coffee lovers also seemed to have healthier hearts, which might contribute to the longevity boost, said ...

    HIV & Hepatitis Can Be Deadly Combo for the Heart

    As people with HIV age, their odds for heart attack rise -- and those with untreated hepatitis C have an even higher risk, a new study finds.

    "HIV and hepatitis C co-infection occurs because they share a transmission route -- both viruses may be transmitted through blood-to-blood contac...

    Heart Disease Can Plague Adults With ADHD

    New research suggests that attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) may trigger more than just psychiatric complications: Adults suffering from ADHD may also be more likely to develop some type of cardiovascular disease.

    "Clinicians need to c...

    Have Sleep Apnea & Heart Disease? CPAP May Keep You Out of the Hospital

    People with heart disease should be screened for sleep apnea, the authors of a new study suggest. They found that consistent use of a CPAP machine lowered the chances of winding up back in the hospital for heart issues.

    "Cardiovascular disease is the No. 1 killer of older adults in the world," said study author Jenni...

    How Many Steps a Day (and How Fast) to Lengthen Your Life?

    There's an easy way to reduce your risk for dementia, heart disease and cancer: Start walking.

    Getting in those recommended 10,000 steps a day makes a real difference, new research affirms, but even fewer will pay big dividends. No matter how many you log, however, step up your pace for...

    Who's at Higher Risk for A-Fib, Men or Women?

    Doctors have long thought men had more risk of developing atrial fibrillation (a-fib) than women, but the reverse may actually be the case.

    When researchers accounted for height differences between men and women, a new study revealed that women were 50% more likely to develop a-fib, an irregular heart rhythm disorder, than men.

    "This is the first study to show an actual flip in the ...

    Lupus, MS and Other Autoimmune Disorders Raise Heart Risks

    Research has linked heart disease to specific autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and lupus. Now, a huge study shows that autoimmune diseases as a group increase your chances of developing heart ills.

    Autoimmune diseases such as psoriasis, multiple sclerosis, lupus erythematosus and type 1 diabetes occur when the body engages in friendly fire against its own organs, tissues, ...

    Breastfeeding Can Protect Hearts of Mom, Baby Long Term

    Breastfeeding can deliver long-term heart benefits to both mother and child, a new statement from the American Heart Association (AHA) says.

    The immune systems of newborns and infants can be strengthened by breast milk, which has long been a...