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Baby's Feeding Troubles Tied to Later Developmental Delays

Parents struggling with infant feeding issues may have another reason to persevere: New research ties feeding problems with an increased risk of developmental delays.

For the study, the mothers of nearly 3,600 children were surveyed about feeding problems at 18, 24 and 30 months of age, such as gagging, crying during meals or pushing food away. The children were also screened for developm...

Progress on Lung Cancer Drives Overall Decline in U.S. Cancer Deaths

A new report offers hope on the lung cancer front: Patients are being diagnosed at an earlier stage in their disease and living longer due to better access to care, higher screening rates and improved treatments.

And that is driving overall cancer rates down, researchers discovered.

Still, lung cancer remai...

Do Not Use At-Home COVID Test Swabs in the Throat: FDA

Swabs that come with at-home rapid antigen COVID-19 tests should be used in the nose and not the throat, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration warns.

It issued the warning on Twitter in response to reports that some people are using swabs intended for nasal samples to take samples from their throats a...

You Can Help Prevent Cervical Cancer

Cervical cancer is the only gynecologic cancer that can be prevented, yet there were more than 4,000 deaths in the United States in 2021 and nearly 14,500 new cases, the American Cancer Society says.

The best way to prevent this is to make sure you and your children get their human papillomavirus vaccines, experts noted.

Nearly all cervical cancer stems from HPV, which will first c...

Could New Blood Test Predict Pregnancy Complications?

A simple blood test may help spot pregnant women who are at risk for developing preeclampsia -- dangerously high blood pressure during pregnancy -- before it becomes a threat to both mother and child.

Marked by a sudden spike in blood pressure, protein in urine or other problems during pregnancy, preeclampsia occurs in about 1 in 25 pregnancies in the United States, according to the lates...

'Benign' Adrenal Gland Tumors Might Cause Harm to Millions

Millions of people are at increased risk of type 2 diabetes and high blood pressure and don't even know it, due to a hidden hormone problem in their bodies.

As many as 1 in 10 people have a non-cancerous tumor on one or both of their adrenal glands that could cause the gland to produce excess amounts of the stress hormone cortisol.

Up to now, doctors have thought that these tumors h...

Many Cancer Patients Face Mounting Bills Despite Having Insurance

Many insured cancer patients still experience serious money problems linked to their illness, new research affirms.

For example, nearly 3 out of 4 insured patients with colon cancer have major financial hardship in the year after their diagnosis, which affects their social functioning and quality of life, according to

  • Steven Reinberg HealthDay Reporter
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  • January 4, 2022
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  • Make 2022 Your Year for a Free Memory Screening

    When it comes to routine health screenings, resolve to include a memory assessment in 2022.

    The Alzheimer’s Foundation of America offers routine screenings that are both virtual and free every Monday, Wednesday and Friday.

    The process is quick, taking about 10 to 15 minutes. It includes a series of questions meant to gauge memory, language, thinking skills and other intellectual ...

    CT Lung Cancer Screening Saved His Life, and Could Do So for More

    Wolfgang Lehner always considered himself "a triple threat" when it came to cancer risk.

    One grandfather died of lung cancer in the 1970s. His other grandfather had his own bout with stomach cancer. And Lehner himself was a smoker.

    Although the New York City cinematographer quit smoking in 2010, at age 51, he never quit worrying about lung cancer.

    In 2017 his worst fear was r...

    Risk of Vision Trouble Rises in Children With Type 2 Diabetes

    A condition called "diabetic retinopathy" often threatens the vision of adults with diabetes, but new research suggests that kids with type 2 diabetes may be particularly vulnerable to the vision-robbing complication.

    In fact, these kids were nearly twice as likely to develop the condition as children with type 1 diabetes were, the researchers found.

    "The new findings emphasize the ...

    What's Behind Unexplained Epilepsy in Kids? A Gene Test May Tell

    Genetic testing can help guide management and treatment of unexplained epilepsy in children, new research suggests.

    "A genetic diagnosis impacted medical management for nearly three out of four children in our study," said study author Dr. Isabel Haviland. She's a postdoctoral research fellow in neurology/neurobiology at Boston Children's Hospital and Harvard Medical School.

    In the ...

    High Heart Rate Linked to Dementia Risk

    Checking older adults' resting heart rate could help identify those who are more likely to experience a decline in mental function, a Swedish study suggests.

    The researchers found that a high resting heart rate was associated with a greater risk of dementia.

    "We believe it would be valuable to explore if resting heart rate could identify patients with high dementia risk," said lead ...

    More Evidence That Pandemic Delayed Cancer Diagnoses

    New research offers fresh proof that the COVID-19 pandemic delayed cancer diagnoses in the United States, increasing patients' risk for poor outcomes.

    For the study, researchers analyzed data from more than 9 million patients at over 1,200 Veterans Affairs (VA) medical facilities.

    Procedures to diagnose cancer were used less often and there were fewer new cancer diagnoses in 2020 t...

    A Routine Skin Check Could Save Your Life

    It may sound dramatic, but skin checks save lives.

    While encouraging people to do routine self-exams, the American Academy of Dermatology (AAD) shares some case studies that led to important discoveries.

    Richard Danzer, of West Palm Beach, Fla., found a large, painful cyst on his back during a skin self-exam. Dermatologist Dr. Brittany Smirnov examined him, and he was later diagnose...

    Brain's 'White Matter' Changes in People With Autism

    Teens and young adults with autism show marked differences in their brains' white matter compared to those without the disorder, a new study finds.

    "If you think of gray matter as the computer, white matter is like the cables," said study co-author Clara Weber, a postgraduate research fellow at Yale University School of Medicine.

    The changes are most apparent in the region involved ...

    President Biden to Undergo Routine Colonoscopy

    President Joe Biden is undergoing a routine colonoscopy Friday, and will briefly transfer power to Vice President Kamala Harris while he's sedated for the procedure, the White House said.

    The colonoscopy will be part of Biden's first routine physical exam as president, and will take place at Walter Reed National Military Center.

    "As was the case when President George W. Bush had the...

    Lung Cancer Survival Continues to Improve, But Not for All

    Lung cancer survival rates in the United States continue to rise, but certain racial groups are still hit hard by the disease, the American Lung Association reports.

    Its fourth annual "State of Lung Cancer" report shows that the average five-year survival rate increased from 14.5% to nearly 24%, but it remains at 20% for people of color overall, and 18% for Black Americans.

    "The rep...

    Child Nasal Swab Tests Conducted by Parent Yield Accurate Results: Study

    Parent-collected nasal swab samples from kids could be as good at detecting respiratory infections such as COVID-19 as those taken by nurses, but that's not the case with saliva samples, British researchers say.

    Respiratory infections such as colds and flu are among the most common illnesses in kids treated by primary care doctors. COVID-19 is also a respiratory infection.

    "Our...

    More Than 2 Million COVID Home Test Kits Recalled Due to False Positive Results

    A recall of Ellume at-home COVID-19 test kits has been expanded to include roughly 2 million of the 3.5 million tests that had been shipped to the United States by last month, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration said Tuesday.

    The original recall, involving 427,000 kits, was first announced in early October due to a "higher than acceptable" rate of false positives. It's a Class I recall ...

    50 Years On, Real Progress in War Against Cancer

    Since 1971, when the U.S. government made defeating cancer a goal and put major funding behind it, death rates for many cancers have plummeted, but some are increasing, according to a new American Cancer Society report.

    Death rates for all cancers combined have declined since passage of the National Cancer Act of 1971, according to the report. For example, in 2019, deaths from lung c...

    Black Men Less Likely to Get Follow-Up MRI When Test Suggests Prostate Cancer

    Black, Hispanic and Asian men in the United States are less likely than white men to receive a follow-up MRI after a screening suggests prostate cancer, a new study finds.

    "We can't say definitively if the reason Black, Hispanic, and Asian men did not receive this particular test is that physicians did not refer them for it, or if the patients opted themselves out of further testing," sai...

    Two New Symptoms That Could Point to Pancreatic Cancer

    Researchers have identified two previously unrecognized symptoms of pancreatic cancer -- a discovery that might help with earlier detection and improve extremely low survival numbers, they say.

    "When pancreatic cancer is diagnosed earlier, patients have a higher chance of survival. It is possible to diagnose patients when they visit their GP, but both patients and GPs need to be aware of ...

    Screening School Kids for Depression Boosts Diagnoses, Outcomes

    Schools could provide solutions for kids who are grappling with depression, a new study suggests.

    Students who have school-based depression screening are twice as likely to begin treatment as peers who don't get that service, researchers say.

    "Our study is publishing at a time when more adolescents are reporting symptoms of depression," said principal investigator Dr. Deepa Sekhar, ...

    Blood Test Looks at Patients' Whole Genome to Spot Rare Inherited Diseases

    Whole genome sequencing of blood samples improves detection of rare genetic conditions called mitochondrial disorders, British researchers report.

    These disorders are inherited and affect about 1 in 4,300 people, causing progressive, incurable diseases.

    Though they are among the most common inherited disorders, mitochondrial disorders are tough to diagnose because they can affect ma...

    Will an Early-Stage Breast Cancer Spread? New Analysis Offers Some Answers

    It's a life-and-death prediction: How likely is early-stage breast cancer to spread throughout the rest of a patient's body?

    A new analysis that tried to make that call easier for doctors to predict found that a younger age at diagnosis was a strong indicator of spreading ("metastatic") cancer.

    To come to that conclusion, the researchers analyzed data from tens of thousands of women...

    Have Diabetes? Here's How to Save Your Sight

    Managing your diabetes can be tough, but your eyes might thank you for it.

    Diabetic retinopathy is a diabetes complication that damages the retina's blood vessels, often resulting in vision loss and blindness. The condition occurs in more than half of people with diabetes.

    It affects nearly 8 million Americans and that number is expected to double by 2050, according to an Ameri...

    More Lung Cancer Patients Are Surviving, Thriving

    Mike Smith is beating the odds.

    Diagnosed with stage 4 lung cancer back in 2016, the 56-year-old South Carolina resident says there are a lot of reasons to be optimistic as the "narrative of lung cancer changes from being a horrific, terminal disease to a chronic disease and, ultimately, to a cure."

    Still, he remains clear-eyed about the challenges he faces.

    "I'm at war," he s...

    Why Are Cases of Pancreatic Cancer Rising in Young Women?

    In his work with patients who have pancreatic cancer, Dr. Srinivas Gaddam was bothered by something that he was seeing.

    "There are some patients that you can't stop thinking about because they've left a mark on you and you try your best to turn things around, but there's only so much you can do," said Gaddam, who said he had found himself caring for a few patients who were very young.

    Lyme Disease Often Spotted at Later Stage in Black Patients

    The tell-tale sign of Lyme disease is its bulls-eye rash, but that might be harder to spot in Black people, who are often diagnosed with more advanced disease than white people are, new research suggests.

    The first sign of Lyme disease looks different on darker skin, and these differences are not usually reflected in images found in medical textbooks, explained study author Dr. Dan Ly. He...

    Your Free Cancer Screen Shows Trouble: What If You Can't Afford the Follow-Up?

    Just over a decade ago, the passage of the Affordable Care Act (ACA, or Obamacare) made many common cancer screenings free. But a pair of new studies caution that when those free tests turn up signs of trouble, important follow-up tests may be too pricey for some patients.

    The bigger concern: Some patients may forgo these expensive tests, even when they may prove lifesaving.

    "With t...

    Are Breast Self-Exams Necessary? The Answer May Surprise You

    A shift in thinking means it's OK to skip your monthly breast self-exam — but don't miss your regular professional checkup and diagnostic imaging, health experts say.

    A periodic visual check in a mirror can be helpful, breast health experts from the Cedars-Sinai health system in California suggest.

    "Beginning at age 40, women with an average risk for breast cancer should rely on a...

    Colon Cancer Diagnoses Fell 40% in Pandemic, and That's Not Good News

    Colon cancer numbers dropped dramatically during the COVID-19 pandemic, but that doesn't mean fewer people have the disease.

    In Spain, researchers discovered a more than 40% decline in colon cancer diagnoses, leading experts to worry about the ramifications.

    "These are very worrying findings indeed -- cases of colorectal cancer undoubtedly went undiagnosed during the pandemic. Not o...

    Tracking Key Protein Helps Predict Outcomes in TBI Patients

    When people suffer a severe head injury, it's hard to predict how they will fare in the long run. But a new study suggests that something fairly simple — measuring a protein in the blood — could help.

    The protein, called neurofilament light (NfL), is a component of the nerve fibers brain cells use to transmit signals. Damage to those fibers (called axons) is known to foretell a high...

    New Tests for Colon, Prostate Cancer Show Promise

    A pair of experimental tests could help doctors detect colon or prostate cancer with just a sample of blood or saliva.

    One test examines a person's blood for four biomarkers linked to inflammation. In a small study, it outperformed the fecal blood test now used in colon cancer screening, said lead researcher Dr. Mona Eldeeb, of Alexandria University Medical Research Institute in Egypt.

    Can a Computer Program Help Docs Spot Breast Cancer?

    An artificial intelligence tool could help radiologists spot breast cancer on ultrasound images and reduce the need for extra testing, new research suggests.

    "Our study demonstrates how artificial intelligence can help radiologists reading breast ultrasound exams to reveal only those that show real signs of breast cancer, and to avoid verification by biopsy in cases that turn out to be be...

    Cancer in Hispanics: Good News and Bad

    Hispanic people in the United States have lower cancer rates than white people, but they are much more likely to develop certain preventable cancers.

    "The good news is that overall cancer rates are lower in Hispanic people, but we are seeing very high rates of infectious disease-related cancers, many of which are potentially avoidable," said study author Kimberly Miller, a scientist at th...

    4 Out of 10 Adults With No Known Heart Disease Have Fatty Hearts: Study

    Many middle-aged adults with apparently healthy hearts have a "silent" buildup of fatty deposits in their arteries, a large, new study shows.

    Researchers found that of more than 25,000 50- to 64-year-olds, about 42% had signs of atherosclerosis — a buildup of "plaques" in the arteries that can lead to a heart attack or stroke.

    That was despite the fact that none had any history of...

    Doctors Often Miss Signs of Type 1 Diabetes in Kids

    Potentially dangerous symptoms of type 1 diabetes in children are not always immediately recognized by primary care providers, new research suggests.

    In type 1 diabetes, the pancreas fails to make enough insulin, the hormone that helps regulate blood sugar used for energy by cells. Between 5% and 10% of cases of diabetes are type 1, which often first surfaces in childhood.

    The Swed...

    Why Are More U.S. Babies Being Born With Syphilis?

    The number of U.S. infants born with syphilis is climbing at an alarming pace, reaching a high not seen since the 1990s, according to new government figures.

    Newborn syphilis, a potentially fatal condition, was at one time nearly eliminated in the United States. But the disease has seen a resurgence in recent years — and 2020 was no exception, say researchers with the U.S. Centers for D...

    Having Even a Cousin or Grandparent With Colon Cancer Raises Your Risk: Study

    Colon cancer risk runs in families, and it's not just a parent or sibling having had the disease that should concern you.

    If you have a second- or third-degree relative who had colon cancer at an early age, your odds of having the disease substantially increase, a new study finds.

    First-degree relatives include parents, children and siblings. Second-degree relatives include aunts, u...

    9/11 First Responders Face Higher Cancer Risk 20 Years Later

    Twenty years on, responders to the World Trade Center attacks in New York City are showing increased risks of certain cancers, two new studies confirm.

    Researchers found higher-than-average rates of prostate cancer among firefighters, medics and other workers who toiled at the disaster site on and after Sept. 11, 2001.

    And compared with firefighters from other major U.S. cities...

    Obamacare's Medicaid Expansion Helped Americans' Blood Pressure

    With the expansion of Medicaid under Obamacare, fewer Americans are uninsured and more are getting their blood pressure and blood sugar under control, a new study finds.

    The gains are especially strong among Black and Hispanic patients, according to Boston University researchers.

    "Our results suggest that over the longer-run, expanding Medicaid eligibility may improve key chronic di...

    Your State's Laws Might Save Your Life If Breast Cancer Strikes

    When Nancy Cappello was diagnosed with advanced breast cancer in 2003, she was stunned.

    How could this have happened? She went for her annual screening mammogram every year and was always told that all was fine.

    It wasn't.

    Cappello had dense breasts, but no one had ever told her. "The tumor was likely growing for five to seven years," said her husband, Joseph Cappello. "At the...

    Child Cancers Are Rare, But Here Are Signs to Look For

    Most parents want their children to live carefree lives, so a diagnosis of childhood cancer is devastating. Fortunately, pediatric cancers are rare.

    Yet it doesn't hurt to be watchful for the warning signs, suggest experts in childhood cancer from Penn State Health.

    The best screening most parents can do is to stay on track with well-child visits, the doctors said.

    "For e...

    Black Americans, Mexican Americans Develop Diabetes Earlier in Life

    Black Americans and Mexican Americans typically develop type 2 diabetes up to seven years earlier than their white counterparts, a new study finds.

    In all, more than 25% of adults in the two groups reported being diagnosed with diabetes before age 40, and 20% didn't know they had the disease.

    Researchers said the findings highlight the need to address economic and social conditions ...

    Sen. Amy Klobuchar Treated for Breast Cancer

    U.S. Sen. Amy Klobuchar revealed Thursday that she's been treated for early-stage breast cancer, including surgery to remove a lump and radiation therapy.

    The 61-year-old Minnesota Democrat said in a statement posted on social media that Mayo Clinic doctors found worrying signs...

    Mom-to-Be's 'Leaky' Heart Valves May Pose More Danger Than Thought

    Leaky heart valves can put pregnant women at serious risk, according to a large study that runs counter to established practice.

    The condition used to be considered relatively harmless during pregnancy. But this analysis by Johns Hopkins University researchers of more than 20,000 individual medical records reveals that heart valve disease puts women at risk for bleeding, high blood pressu...

    Pandemic Brought Big Drop in Breast Cancer Screening in Older, Low-Income Women

    Many parts of the United States saw a significant drop in breast cancer screening of older low-income women during the COVID-19 pandemic, new research shows.

    The analysis of data from 32 community health centers that serve low-income people found that breast cancer screening for 50- to 74-year-old women dropped 8% between July 2019 and July 2020. That wiped out an 18% increase between Jul...

    Expert Panel Lowers Routine Screening Age for Diabetes to 35

    The recommended age to start screening overweight and obese people for diabetes will be lowered by five years from 40 to 35, the nation's leading panel of preventive health experts has announced.

    The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) has decided an earlier five years of testing could help detect more people who have prediabetes, said Dr. Michael Barry, vice chair of the USPSTF....

    Spotting the Signs of Deadly Melanoma Skin Cancers

    Regular skin checks to look for signs of melanoma could save your life.

    Self-exams for the deadliest type of skin cancer should be done at least once a month in a well-lit room in front of a full-length mirror and also with a hand mirror for hard-to-see areas, said Dr. Arun Mavanur, a surgical oncologist.

    You also need to get checked by a doctor if you have risk factors for melanoma...