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08 Sep

Telemedicine and In-Person Diagnoses Match Most of the Time, New Study Finds

A review of 2,400 cases finds diagnoses made via telemedicine often match those made at the doctor’s office.

Health News Results - 178

Monitoring Toilet Sounds Could Help Spot Disease

A small toilet-based sound sensor that can tell the difference between peeing, pooping and diarrhea may one day help prevent cholera outbreaks.

"The hope is that this sensor, which is small in footprint and noninvasive in approach, could be deployed to areas where cholera outbreaks are a persistent risk," said researcher

Mind-Controlled Wheelchair Brings New Freedom to People With Paralysis

A severely paralyzed person no longer needs to go through brain surgery to try and steer a motorized wheelchair with their mind, researchers report.

Through an electrode-studded cap placed on their head, several people with quadriplegia -- no function in all four limbs -- were able to produce brain waves that guided their wheelchair through a kind of hospital "obstacle course."

The ...

Telemedicine's Popularity Has Risen During Pandemic

Telemedicine became widespread during the pandemic, and that may have shifted patient views about using technology as way to communicate with their doctors, a new study suggests.

Certain groups, including Black patients and those with lower education levels, became especially more apt to use it.

"Our findings suggest that more Americans are becoming comfortable with telehealth and u...

Pain Relief in a FLASH: Radiation Treatments Lasting Seconds May Advance Cancer Care

Flash radiotherapy, a new technology that uses targeted proton beams, is safe and effective in relieving pain for terminal cancer patients, a new, small study suggests.

Flash radiotherapy delivers radiation at dose rates more than 300 times higher than those used in conventional radiation...

Age Matters for Use of At-Home Tests

These days, you can test yourself for COVID-19, HIV, potential problems in your DNA or even a urinary tract infection while never leaving your home.

Researchers set out to find what older folks thought of the tests, whether they use them and how often they reported their results to a physician who could provide care if there was a problem.

"As more companies bring these direct-to-co...

You Can Now Buy Hearing Aids Over-the-Counter.  Experts Offer Tips for Consumers

It's official: Older Americans with hearing loss can now stroll into a big box store or pharmacy — or just visit a website — and buy hearing aids without a prescription.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration recently approved this

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • October 17, 2022
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  • New Test of Pancreatic Cysts Might Boost Cancer Detection

    Pancreatic cancer is often fatal, but a molecular test that can accurately distinguish benign cysts from those that could become cancerous may be a key to saving lives.

    Researchers tested the technology — called PancreaSeq — to see if it could work in a clinical setting and found success.

    “Based on the results of this study, molecular testing of pancreatic cysts is poised to e...

    Fitness Trackers Could Get You Stepping More -- Even If You Don't Look at Them

    Wearing a fitness tracker may help you get more steps in -- even if you never give it a glance.

    A new study found that folks who wore a pedometer averaged 318 more steps a day than those who didn't, even without specific

  • By Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • September 30, 2022
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  • Over-the-Counter Hearing Aids Are Coming in October. Experts Offer Tips for Consumers

    Adults with hearing loss soon will be able to amble into a big box store or pharmacy — or just visit a website — and buy hearing aids without a prescription.

    Over-the-counter hearing aids will be on the market by mid-October, available for purchas...

    FDA Warns of Cybersecurity Risk With Certain Medtronic Insulin Pumps

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is warning patients who use a particular insulin pump system that unauthorized people could access it and change how much insulin a patient receives.

    The pump at the center of the FDA alert is the Medtronic MiniMed 600 Series Insulin Pump S...

    Forehead Thermometers May Miss Fevers in Black Patients

    Thermometers that read body temperature via the forehead have become a common sight throughout the pandemic, but whether they always spot a fever may depend on the color of someone's skin.

    In a new study, researchers found that, similar to problems seen with

  • By Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • September 8, 2022
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  • One Form of Fertility Treatment May Raise Long-Term Cancer Risk in Offspring

    Children born as a result of a common fertility procedure involving frozen embryos may have higher risk of cancer, Swedish researchers report.

    In frozen-thawed embryo transfer, an embryo is created in a laboratory from an egg and sperm, frozen and later thawed before implant...

    With Smartwatch, Cardiac Rehab at Home May Work Best

    A new smartwatch could be a key player in preventing heart attacks among people suffering from risky heart conditions, a new study claims.

    Using the smartwatch to track their heart health, patients in a home-based cardiac rehab program were more than 20% less likely to land in the hospital t...

    High-Tech Socks Could Prevent Falls in At-Risk Patients

    Every year, anywhere from 700,000 to 1 million people fall while in U.S. hospitals, and this often triggers a downward health spiral.

    Little has been shown to make a dent in those numbers. Until now.

    Enter Smart Socks, which are wired with sensors that send an alert...

    Can Your Smartphone Spot a Narrowed Neck Artery?

    A smartphone video could detect a blocked blood vessel in your neck that could cause a stroke, a new study suggests.

    The American Heart Association says videos may provide a non-invasive way to screen people who are at risk of stroke.

    Nearly 87% of strokes are the ischemic type, which happens when fatty depos...

    Are High-Tech Blood Pressure Monitors Really Worth It?

    When it comes to taking your blood pressure at home, smart devices with lots of bells and whistles are no better than old-school monitors, which happen to cost much less.

    This is the main finding of a new study that compared high-tech devices that link to your smartph...

    More Evidence Fitness Trackers Can Boost Your Health

    Your fitness tracker, pedometer or smartwatch may motivate you to exercise more and lose weight, Australian researchers say.

    In a large research review, the investigators found that tracking your activity might inspire you to

  • Steven Reinberg HealthDay Reporter
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  • July 26, 2022
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  • Common, Crucial Medical Device Often Gives Wrong Readings for Black Patients

    Early in the pandemic, scores of Americans bought pulse oximeters to help determine how sick they were while infected with COVID-19, but new research finds the devices often miss dangerously low blood oxygen levels in Black veterans.

    This is not the first time such inaccuracies...

    Nerve-Cooling Implant Could Ease Pain Without Opioids

    Hinting at a future alternative to opioid painkillers, scientists have developed a tiny implant designed to ease post-surgery pain and then dissolve once the job is done.

    So far, the research has been limited to lab animals, and it will be several years before the technology could be ready for human testing....

    Telemedicine Could Really Help People Battling Advanced Cancers

    As a bill that would expand Medicare coverage for telehealth services makes its way through the U.S. Senate, a new study of people with advanced cancer suggests the practice could improve the lives of patients.

    The use of telehealth skyrocketed during the pandemic: A U.S. Health and Human Services ...

    'Open Source' Automated Insulin Delivery Systems Help People With Type 1 Diabetes

    Open-source automated insulin delivery (AID) systems are an effective and safe way for people with type 1 diabetes to control their blood sugar levels, researchers say.

    The AID systems combine an insulin pump, a contin...

    Woman Receives 3-D Printed Ear Transplant Made of Human Cells

    A 3-D printed ear made with the patient's own cells has been transplanted onto a 20-year-old woman, the company that made the ear says.

    The achievement announced June 2 by 3DBio Therapeutics of New York City is believed to be the first known example of a 3-D printed implant made of living tissues. Experts hailed it as a major advance in...

    Scientists Are Developing Patch That Warns of Oncoming Drug Overdose

    With the United States facing an epidemic of drug overdoses, researchers are developing a wearable patch that can detect an oncoming opioid OD and deliver doses of a drug that could save lives.

    The Indiana University Bloomington research team has received a three-year, $3.8 million grant from the U.S. National Institute on Drug Abuse to develop the patch, which combines two separate cutti...

    Tongue Stimulator Shows Promise as Sleep Apnea Treatment in Kids With Down Syndrome

    Children with Down syndrome are more likely than other kids to have sleep apnea, and existing treatments often fail to work.

    Now, an implanted device that stimulates tongue nerves shows promise in reducing their sleep disruptions, a new study finds.

    A device called a hypoglossal nerve stimulator is already approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for adults with

  • By Robert Preidt HealthDay Reporter
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  • April 22, 2022
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  • Can Wearables Track the Severity of COVID Symptoms?

    Fitness trackers can tell you how well you're sleeping, how fast you're walking and, of course, how many steps you've taken.

    But during the pandemic, researchers have also investigated the ability of smart watches to help detect COVID-19 or provide data on recovery.

    The latest study uses several measures of heart rate data to help track the progression of symptoms in someone wh...

    Devices That Can Help You Get a Restful Night's Sleep

    If you're thinking about getting a device to help you sleep better, an expert offers some advice.

    Sleep-tracking devices range from those that record how much you sleep to those that monitor your sleep stages, but it can be difficult to know if they'll provide good re...

    New Way to Blast Kidney Stones Can Be Done in Doctor's Office

    A noninvasive ultrasound technique is capable of quickly pulverizing kidney stones, an early study shows - in what researchers call a first step toward a simpler, anesthesia-free treatment for the painful problem.

    The study reports on the first 19 patients who've had kidney stones treated with the ultrasound "bursts." So far, it's been able to completely, or nearly completely, break up st...

    Computer Helps 'Locked-In' ALS Patients Communicate, Shop Online

    A handful of "locked-in" amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients can now work a laptop computer using their brain waves, thanks to an implant lodged in a major vein inside their skull.

    The implant - a stent lined with 16 miniscule electrodes - is nestled in a vein located near the motor cortex of complete...

    Smartwatch Heart Data May Be Less Accurate for Black Users

    Millions of Americans use smartwatches or fitness trackers to check on their heart rate, but the accuracy may fall short for people of color, a new research review finds.

    The analysis, of 10 published studies, found that in four of them, wearable devices were clea...

    Apps: They Help Manage Health Conditions, But Few Use Them, Poll Finds

    Health and fitness apps are growing in popularity, but not among the people who might benefit most from them - seniors and people with chronic health conditions.

    Nearly two out of three American adults are living with a chronic health problem like heart disease, diabetes or asthma, a new HealthDay/Harris Poll survey found.

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  • March 7, 2022
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  • Are Health Care Apps in Your Future?

    Are you managing a chronic health problem, be it obesity or diabetes or heart disease or asthma?

    There's likely an app for that.

    Health apps are becoming more and more sophisticated, offering smartphone users help in dealing with chronic ailments, said Dr. David Bates, chief of internal med...

    High-Tech Devices May Interfere With Your Implanted Defibrillator

    Some portable tech devices equipped with powerful magnets can interfere with your heart implant's ability to regulate dangerous irregular heart rhythms, a new study reports.

    Swiss researchers found that Apple AirPods Pro, the Microsoft Surface Pen and the Apple Pencil all can temporarily throw a pacemaker/defibrillator off if they are held too close to the implant.

    "These devic...

    In a First, a Robot Performs Laparoscopic Surgery on Pig Without Human Help

    A robot performed challenging keyhole surgery on pigs without any human help in what could be a major step toward fully automated surgery on people.

    "Our findings show that we can automate one of the most intricate and delicate tasks in surgery: the reconnection of two ends of an intestine," said senior study author Axel Krieger. He is an assistant professor of mechanical engineering at J...

    'Artificial Pancreas' Can Help Kids With Type 1 Diabetes

    Having a child with type 1 diabetes can be a challenging health condition for parents to manage, but new research suggests an "artificial pancreas" system may beat standard treatment in controlling the blood sugar disease in young children.

    Forms of the technology -- which automatically monitors and regulates blood sugar -- are already available for adults and kids with

  • Amy Norton HealthDay Reporter
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  • January 20, 2022
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  • U.S. Army Reports Progress on COVID Vaccine That Fights All Variants

    The U.S. Army says it has developed a COVID-19 vaccine it believes could work against any and all coronavirus variants, including Omicron.

    Results from early human trials of the Spike Ferritin Nanoparticle (SpFN) COVID vaccine are expected by the end of the month, the Army added.

    Lab studies have already shown that the new vaccine protects monkeys from the original strain of COVID-...

    Could Cochlear Implants Cause Harm to Hearing Over Time?

    People who get cochlear implants to treat severe hearing loss may develop new bone growth in the ear -- and it may lessen any hearing they have left, a new study hints.

    The researchers found that among 100-plus adults with cochlear implants, two-thirds showed evidence of new bone formation near the implant within four years. And of patients who still had some hearing when they received th...

    Wearable Vibration Device May Ease Parkinson's Tremor

    Physiotherapist David Putrino was working on a vibrating glove to help deaf people experience live music when a friend mentioned that the same technology might stop tremors in people with Parkinson's disease.

    Putrino, director of rehabilitation innovation for Mount Sinai Health System in New York City, was intrigued. The friend's father had Parkinson's, so they placed the new device on hi...

    Reminder Apps on Smartphones May Help in Early Dementia

    Despite stereotypes about seniors and technology, a small study suggests that older adults in the early stages of dementia can use smartphone apps as memory aids.

    The researchers found that older people with mild impairments in memory and thinking were not only able to learn how to use the apps, they said the digital aids made their daily lives easier.

    The apps were not specially de...

    Coming Soon: A Wearable Device to Predict Epileptic Seizures

    Claire Wiedmaier experiences epileptic seizures so bad that she's broken teeth while in their grip.

    "I have some fake teeth. I broke my two bottom front teeth," said Wiedmaier, 23, of Ankeny, Iowa, who these days can expect to have at least four seizures a month.

    Knowing when to expect a seizure would be a big help to her.

    "It would be nice to know, because then I could get so...

    Mouse Study Points to Possible Breakthrough Against Spinal Cord Injury

    Severe spinal cord injuries are incurable today in humans, but a new injectable therapy that restored motion in laboratory mice could pave the way for healing paralyzed people.

    The therapy -- liquid nanofibers that gel around the damaged spinal cord like a soothing blanket -- produces chemical signals that promote healing and reduce scarring, researchers report.

    The treatment p...

    Supply Chain Issues Bring Shortages of Drugs, Devices to U.S. Hospitals

    The word went out late last month throughout Utah -- if you've got a spare set of aluminum crutches lying around, you should donate them to your local hospital.

    An international shortage of aluminum has caused delays in shipments of crutches and walkers, so Utah hospitals banded together for #LeanOnUtah -- a community drive to collect gently used durable medical supplies.

    No patient...

    FDA Eases Access to Cheaper Over-the-Counter Hearing Aids

    Affordable over-the-counter hearing aids could soon bring relief to millions of Americans suffering from hearing loss, under a landmark proposal announced Tuesday by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

    The proposal would create a category of hearing aids that could be sold directly to consumers, without either a medical exam or a fitting by an audiologist.

    Until now, folks suffer...

    'Personalized' Brain Zaps May Ease Tough-to-Treat Depression

    Imagine battling debilitating depression for years, trying everything but finding little or no relief.

    That's what Sarah, 36, lived with most of her adult life.

    "I had exhausted all possible treatment options," recalled Sarah, who did not want her last name used. "It [depression] had controlled my entire life. I barely moved. I barely did anything. I felt tortured every day."

    ...

    SmartWatches Detect Viral Infection Before Symptoms Surface in Study

    Someday, your smartwatch might be able to tell you if you're coming down with a virus and how sick you'll be -- even before symptoms start.

    In a small study, researchers showed that a wearable device, like a Fitbit or Apple Watch, could detect which patients had the H1N1 flu and which had a common cold.

    "One of our goals was to be able to detect that infection before a person feels ...

    Smartphone Apps May Aid in Heart Attack Recovery

    After a heart attack, a smartwatch app may help keep patients from being hospitalized again, researchers say.

    The app helps patients keep track of medications and make lifestyle changes. It may also reduce rehospitalization in the month after discharge by half, according to a new report.

    The American Heart Association says one in six heart attack patients returns to the hospital wit...

    Can a Computer Program Help Docs Spot Breast Cancer?

    An artificial intelligence tool could help radiologists spot breast cancer on ultrasound images and reduce the need for extra testing, new research suggests.

    "Our study demonstrates how artificial intelligence can help radiologists reading breast ultrasound exams to reveal only those that show real signs of breast cancer, and to avoid verification by biopsy in cases that turn out to be be...

    Robotics Bring the White Cane Into the 21st Century

    The "white cane" that many blind people rely on for navigating the world hasn't been upgraded in a century, but researchers are reporting progress on a "robo-cane" they hope will modernize the assistive device.

    The prototype cane is equipped with a color 3D camera, sensors and an "on-board" computer designed to guide the user to a desired location -- and avoid any obstacles along...

    Could Cheaper, Over-the-Counter Hearing Aids Finally Be Here?

    Until now, folks suffering from hearing loss typically have had to fork out thousands of dollars for a device that could be adjusted only by a professional audiologist.

    No wonder that only one-quarter of the nearly 29 million U.S. adults who could benefit from a hearing aid have actually tried one, according to the U.S.

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • September 9, 2021
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  • Cardiac Arrest? Someday, Drones May Come to Save You

    A good Samaritan can save the life of someone in cardiac arrest if a portable defibrillator is nearby. Now, a pilot study suggests a new way to get the devices into bystanders' hands: drones.

    The study, done in Sweden, found that drone delivery was a feasible way to get automated external defibrillators (AEDs) to the scene of a cardiac arrest. In fact, the drones typically beat ambulances...

    FDA Approves First Nerve-Stimulation Device to Aid Stroke Recovery

    A first-of-a-kind nerve stimulation treatment for people who have problems moving their arms after a stroke has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

    "People who have lost mobility in their hands and arms due to ischemic stroke are often limited in their treatment options for regaining motor function," explained Dr. Christopher Loftus. He is acting director of the FDA's ...

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