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How Are Toxins Like Lead, Arsenic Getting Into Baby Foods?

Parents in the United States may assume baby food is free of impurities, but a recent research review highlights the much different reality: Most foods made for babies and toddlers have some amount of toxic heavy metals.

The contaminants include metals, such as lead and arsenic, that can harm brain development, and contribute to learning and behavior problems in children. And they are fou...

Rare But Dangerous Form of Eating Disorder Could Run in Families

Genes may have a strong influence over whether kids develop an eating disorder marked by extremely limited food choices, a new study finds.

The study focused on a condition called avoidant restrictive food intake disorder (ARFID). It's a relatively new diagnosis that describes people who seve...

USDA Proposes New Rules to Cut Sugar, Salt in School Meals

American schoolchildren could be getting school lunches that have less sugar and salt in the future, thanks to new nutrition standards announced by the U.S. Department of Agriculture on Friday.

These are the first school lunch program updates since 2012, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

What’s dif...

Do You Need an Insulin-Resistance Diet?

People with health conditions like type 2 diabetes, gestational diabetes or polycystic ovarian syndrome may have been advised about the value of an insulin-resistance diet.

But this way of eating can benefit most people interested in balancing blood sugars, whether that’s to help treat or prevent chronic conditions, or just to gain more energy and better mood control.

"An ‘insul...

Do You Live in a 'Food Swamp'? It Could Be Raising Your Heart Risk

Americans who live near a "food swamp" may have a higher risk of suffering a stroke, a preliminary study finds.

A number of studies have looked at the health consequences of living in a so-called food desert -- areas with few grocery stores or other options for buying fresh food.

Food swamps are different: The term was coined to describe communities where fast food restaurants, conv...

Another Study Links 'Ultra-Processed' Foods to Higher Cancer Risk

Fizzy sodas, microwaveable meals and packaged cookies are convenient for people on the go, but these folks might not go as far as they’d like if that’s all they eat.

Ultra-processed foods appear to increase the risk of developing and dying from a variety of cancers, a new large-scale study says.

Every 10% increase of these foods in your diet increases your overall risk of cance...

Celiac Disease Could Raise Heart Risks, Study Finds

People with celiac disease may be more likely to develop heart disease despite having fewer traditional heart risks than other folks.

Celiac disease is an immune reaction that occurs when some people eat gluten, a protein found in wheat, barley and rye. The only treatment is following a strict gluten-free diet.

People with celiac disease may be 27% more likely to develop heart disea...

Fiber: It's Important to Your Child's Diet, Too

Just like adults, children need lots of fiber in their diets.

Fiber is part of what fuels a child’s normal growth and development. It helps them feel full longer, controls blood sugar levels, reduces cholesterol and promotes regular bowel movements, according to Children's Health of Orange County, Calif. ...

What Is the Mediterranean Diet, and How Can It Help You?

If you're looking for a healthy way to eat that has stood the test of time, the Mediterranean diet may be your best bet.

"There are many health benefits to the Mediterranean diet," said Rahaf Al Bochi, a spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. "The Mediterrane...

Seafood in Pregnancy: To Eat or Not to Eat?

Pregnant women hear a lot of “Do this” and “Don’t do that” advice about what is safe to eat.

But one recommendation that’s particularly important involves seafood: During pregnancy, women need to eat enough seafood to gain the health benefits, but not so much to raise the risk of some significant consequences. They also need to be careful about how the fish they eat is prepare...

Abbott Labs Confirms Justice Department Probe Following Infant Formula Crisis

MONDAY, Jan. 23, 2023 (HealthDay News) – Trouble continues for Abbott Laboratories, which shut down an infant formula plant last year amid reported illnesses.

The U.S. Department of Justice is now investigating the company, though Abbott did not say specifically what the investigation is covering, NBC News reported.

“DOJ has informed us of its investigation and we’r...

New USDA Rules Ramp Up Oversight of Organic Food

FRIDAY, Jan. 20, 2023 (HealthDay News) – Organic food will soon have to comply with stricter labeling rules under new requirements announced Thursday by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA).

In what the Organic Trade Organization (OTA) called the biggest change since the USDA’s organic program was first founded in 1990, the

  • Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • January 20, 2023
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  • The B Vitamins: Put Them on Your A List

    B vitamins. These powerhouse nutrients help your cells function at their best, protect your brain and heart, support your immune system and can even improve your mood and energy levels.

    This critical class of vitamins needs to be part of a healthy diet.

    According to Harvard Health, B vitam...

    Do Fasting Diets Work? Study Finds Meal Size, Not Timing, Key to Weight Loss

    When it comes to weight loss, what seems to matter most is how often and how much you eat, rather than when you eat.

    That’s the conclusion of a new study that focused on the eating habits of about 550 adults.

    For six months, all were asked to use a phone app to report both the timing and size of all their meals.

    “What we found is that, on average, the more meals people a...

    How Many Calories a Day Can Safely Spur Weight Loss?

    The key to losing weight sounds simple — eat less.

    Regardless of the diet you follow, dropping the pounds means burning more calories than you eat. That begs the question, how many calories should I eat to lose weight?

    According to the U.S. National Library of Medicine, for most people, cutti...

    Why Is American Food So Unhealthy?

    It's no secret: The standard American diet is at the root of the obesity epidemic and many of its associated diseases.

    But why is American food so unhealthy? It's not just that Americans eat too much, which they do, but it's also what they eat that's unhealthy: fat, sugar, salt and ultra-processed foods.

    According to the

  • Steven Reinberg HealthDay Reporter
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  • January 17, 2023
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  • Elementary School Kids Get Healthier When Gardening Is on Curriculum

    A Texas-based education initiative has found that enrolling children in poor communities in gardening and cooking classes may help boost their long-term health.

    Called “Texas Sprouts," the program covered one full academic year and exposed elementary school children in 16 low-income schools access to outdoor gardening instruction, nutrition information and cooking lessons. Parents were ...

    What Is the Heart-Healthy DASH Diet?

    A common eating plan with a catchy acronym — the DASH diet — is designed to help you lower your blood pressure, but exactly what can you eat while on it?

    The DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) diet has been around for almost 25 years and it’s still one of the top diets recommended for overall good health and heart disease prevention.

    One recent study of the DASH ...

    Plant-Based Diets: What Are They, and How Do You Start?

    As Americans struggle to eat better, plant-based diets have become the rage, but exactly what are those and how hard are they to follow?

    A growing number of people have turned to plant-based eating, as evidenced by the fact that the plant-based foods market increased by 29% in recent years, according to the U....

    Fast Food May Be Toxic to Your Liver

    Do your liver a favor and steer clear of fast food, new research urges.

    People with obesity or diabetes who consumed 20% or more of their daily calories from fast food had severely elevated levels of fat in their liver compared to those who ate less fast food or none.

    Even the general U.S. population had moderate increases in liver fat when fast food made up one-fifth or more of the...

    You Can Garden Your Way to Better Health

    Anyone who has ever gardened knows what a labor of love it can be as you dig deep in the dirt to plant seeds and then take pride in your first crop, but new research shows it also translates into better health.

    It turns out that community gardens in urban areas can have folks eating more fresh food and getting exercise, while it can also ease stress and anxiety.

    “These kind of int...

    Stick With These Foods to Help You Lose Weight

    When it comes to losing weight, certain foods have a reputation for being all-stars, providing for a body’s nutritional needs while helping keep a person fuller for longer.

    “You’re looking at plant foods,” said Connie Diekman, a nationally known food and nutrition consultant and former president of the Academy of Nutritio...

    Resolved to Lose Weight in 2023? Experts Compare Popular Diets

    Losing weight is one of the most popular New Year's resolutions -- possibly to give yourself an excuse for some New Year's Eve overindulgence.

    "I'm going to cram it all in tonight, so tomorrow I start afresh," jokes registered dietitian Connie Diekman, a nationally known food and nutrition consultant.

    But those waking up ble...

    Menus With 'Climate Change Impact' Info Sway Diners' Choices

    Adding climate-impact labeling to fast-food menus can have a big effect on whether or not consumers go “green" when eating out, new research suggests.

    The finding is based on an online survey that asked consumers to order virtual meals after randomly looking over menus that either had some...

    Diet Drinks May Not Affect Urinary Function in Women

    If you struggle with urinary incontinence and worry that diet drinks may make matters worse, new research suggests they may not have a significant effect.

    "This study is important in that it may guide clinicians counseling women with urinary incontinence to focus more on behavioral modifications, such as total volume intake, rather than on the type of beverage consumed," said

  • Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • December 28, 2022
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  • Another Mediterranean Diet Bonus: Healthier Pregnancies

    The Mediterranean diet delivers plenty of health dividends, and new research now discovers it may lower complications during pregnancy.

    Specifically, women who stuck to the diet had a 21% overall reduced risk of preeclampsia, gestational diabetes, preterm birth, delivery of a small baby and stillbirth, researchers report.

    "We know adverse pregnancy outcomes are becoming more common ...

    Crafting Meals for Astronauts: Healthy Dining in Outer Space

    Diets higher in fruit, vegetables and omega-3 fatty acids could improve astronaut health during long spaceflights while still sticking to requirements for what can go on board, according to new research.

    A new study tested this theory on a spaceflight simulation chamber on Earth with 16 people: 10 men and six women.

    Four individuals participated in each 45-day, Earth-based, closed-...

    Tough New Labeling Law for Sesame Prompts Companies to Add It to Their Products

    Call it a good idea that seems to have backfired: A tough new labeling law that requires even the smallest amount of sesame be listed on food products has instead spurred some companies to add it to their products.

    The new federal law goes into effect on Jan. 1, adding sesame to the list of major al...

    AHA News: With a Little Luck, These Foods Will Get Your New Year Started Right

    Need a healthy way to kick off the new year? You're in luck.

    As the calendar turns, cultures across the world focus on good fortune and associate all kinds of foods with it. Here's a look at which are healthiest -- and how to handle those that are less so.

    Black-eyed peas

    In the American South, it's not New Year's without black-eyed peas, which are actually a ...

    Avoiding 'Wine Teeth' This Holiday Season

    Red may be a traditional holiday color, but no one wants to wear it on their teeth.

    An expert offers some tips for keeping “wine teeth” at bay during your holiday parties.

    “When you drink red wine, you're encountering a triple threat to your teeth's whiteness: anthocyanins, which are the pigments in grapes that give red wine its rich color; tannins, which help bind the pigment...

    Another Mediterranean Diet Bonus: Healthier Sperm, Better Fertility

    Add better chances of conceiving a baby to the list of health benefits linked to the much-touted Mediterranean diet.

    The Mediterranean diet -- which is rich in fresh fruits and veggies, healthy fats like olive oil, whole grains, legumes, nuts and fish -- has been shown to boost brain health, and reduce the risk for heart disease, diabetes and certain cancers. Now, researchers in Australia...

    Loss of Bees Could Harm Health of Millions of People

    Bees, in their role as master pollinators, increase crop yields, leading to more production of healthy fruits, vegetables and nuts.

    But new research claims that the challenges these important insects face from changes in land use, harmful pesticides and climate change is affecting food production, leading to less healthy food in global diets and more diseases causing excess deaths.

    Formula Feeding Raises Odds for Anemia in Very 'Preemie' Babies

    Babies born prematurely who are fed formula may need iron supplementation like their breastfed counterparts, new research suggests.

    “Just because a baby is on iron-rich formula, we should not assume all of their iron needs are being met, since iron from the formula may not have the same absorption as iron from breast milk,” said researcher Grace Power. She is a third-year medical stu...

    Vitamins, Fish Oil, Minerals: Which Supplements Help or Harm the Heart?

    Manufacturers make all kinds of health claims, but can taking a dietary supplement actually lower your heart disease risk?

    A comprehensive analysis of prior research suggests that in certain cases the answer is yes. Some types of supplements -- such as omega-3 fatty acids, folic acid and coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) -- do provide a cardiovascular leg up.

    But many supplements were found...

    Eating Lots of 'Ultra-Processed' Foods Could Harm Your Brain

    Chips, pizza, cookies: Delicious, but a diet full of ultra-processed foods like these may contribute to brain deterioration, researchers report.

    Ultra-processed foods have lots of added and unhealthy ingredients, such as sugar, salt, fat, artificial colors and preservatives. Examples include frozen meals, soft drinks, hot dogs and cold cuts, fast food, packaged cookies, cakes and sal...

    Science Reveals 3 Keys to an Energized, Alert Day

    Advertising would have you believe that a big bowl of sugary cereal or a syrupy iced coffee drink will make you bright-eyed and bushy-tailed in the morning.

    But that sort of sugar-laden breakfast may be one of the worst things you can do to help you wake up alert and refreshed.

    A major new sleep study shows a breakfast rich in complex carbohydrates -- think a big bowl of steel-cut o...

    Put Away That Salt Shaker to Shield Your Heart

    Toss out your salt shaker if you want to lower your risk of heart disease, a new study suggests.

    Even if you already follow a low-salt diet, sprinkling salt on your food can raise your risk for heart disease, heart failure and plaque in cardiac arteries, researchers report.

    "Compared with people who always added salt to foods -- usually at the table -- those who sometimes, rare...

    Most Americans Still Aren't Eating Enough Whole Grains

    Americans are eating more whole grains than ever before -- but it's still not enough.

    Moreover, not everyone agrees on what whole grains actually are, according to a new study that found competing definitions.

    The increase in whole grain intake over the past two decades is either 39.5% or 61.5%, according to researchers from the Tufts University Friedman School of Nutrition Science ...

    Skipping Meals Could Shave Years Off Your Life

    Intermittent fasting -- limiting eating to a small part of the day -- is very popular these days. But that doesn't mean it's healthy.

    A new study published online in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics suggests that people who skipped meals, fasted or ate their meals ...

    Vitamins: It's Best to Get Them From Food, Not a Bottle

    Bottled vitamins might seem a convenient way to get all the important nutrients, but the best delivery method is still just eating actual healthy food.

    “We have plenty of studies showing that when we look at food as the bioavailable source of certain nutrients of vitamins and minerals, they tend to be one of the best options,” said

  • Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • November 25, 2022
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  • Food Banks Save Needy Families Up to $1,000 Per Year

    Millions of Americans will enjoy a hot, nutritious Thanksgiving meal thanks to their local food pantry, often staffed by volunteers. Now, new research spotlights just how important these charities are.

    Families who rely on pantries for food assistance come away with $600 to $1,000 in free meals and produce every year, after taking into account time, transportation and other costs associ...

    All the Flavor, Better Health: Holiday Dinner Ingredient Swaps That Work

    Holiday meals offer an opportunity to indulge in some favorite foods.

    Now for those who want to enjoy healthier versions of these holiday treats, a registered dietitian from Baylor College of Medicine in Houston offers some easy suggestions.

    Veggies can help with the post-meal fatigue you usually feel after a big meal, said

  • Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • November 23, 2022
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  • Keeping T-Day Kitchens Safe for the Whole Family

    The whole family — even the youngest members — can take part in Thanksgiving's hours of food preparation by following some safety tips.

    The nation's leading pediatrics organization offers some holiday advice for families with young children.

    “There's a lot of excitement and joy surrounding meal preparation at this time of year, but it also can be stressful,” said

  • Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • November 23, 2022
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  • Keep Food Poisoning at Bay This Holiday Season

    A happy holiday can go sour quickly when food poisoning joins the party.

    Experts from Rutgers New Jersey Poison Control Center offer some tips on safely thawing, preparing and storing food, as well as avoiding issues with alcohol and drugs.

    “Forgetting about food safety is a recipe for disaster,” said Diane...

    FDA Approves First Lab-Grown Meat Product

    Americans could soon be eating chicken that's grown in a lab from cultured animal cells, rather than raised at a farm or facility.

    The U.S. Food & Drug Administration announced Wednesday that the environment-friendly chicken made by California-ba...

    Healthy Dining Is Healthy for the Planet, Too

    Plant-based diets can be better for the environment, but they're not all created equally, new research shows.

    The best type of plant-based diet for health and environmental benefits are those higher in whole grains, fruits, vegetables, nuts, legumes, vegetable oils and tea/coffee.

    Meanwhile plant-based diets high in fruit juices, sugar-sweetened beverages, refined grains, ...

    Could 'Food Stamps' Program Give Memory a Boost?

    Signing up for "food stamps" might help lower-income seniors preserve their mental capabilities, a new U.S. study suggests.

    Researchers found that eligible older adults who used the government's Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) — commonly called food stamps — had two fewer years of mental...

    You're Eating Healthier These Days, But Is It as Healthy As You Think?

    People trying to adopt a healthier diet probably aren't the best judges of how well they're actually eating, a new study discovers.

    Only about 1 in 4 people could accurately estimate how healthy...

    Do Fasting Diets Affect a Woman's Hormones?

    Intermittent fasting has taken off as a way to lose weight without having to limit types of a food a person eats.

    But there was little research on how eating only during a few hours of the day and then only drinking water might affect female reproductive hormones.

    A new study shows that while hormon...

    Cutting Carbs Could Cut Your Risk for Diabetes

    People at risk for developing diabetes could help themselves now by eating fewer carbs, according to new research.

    While low-carb diets are a common next step for someone diagnosed with the disease, people who are prediabeti...

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