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Results for search "Cancer: Cervical".

22 Aug

Advanced Cervical Cancer on the Rise in the U.S., New Study Finds

Cases of stage IV cervical cancer have been increasing significantly over the past 18 years, researchers say.

02 Feb

Could a Pap Test Help Detect Breast, Ovarian Cancers, Too?

Epigenetic changes in cervical cells may help identify breast and ovarian cancers, researchers say.

Health News Results - 63

Many U.S. Seniors Get Needless, Pricey Cervical Cancer Screenings

Researchers warn that high rates of cervical cancer screening in women over 65 suggest that some older Americans are being unnecessarily screened.

More health data on these screenings in older women is needed to prevent potential harm and unnecessary costs, said the team from University of Illinois Chicago (UIC), University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) and the U.S. Centers for Dise...

Too Often, Women Aren't Told of Sexual Side Effects of Cancer Treatments

When a man has cancer in an area that affects sexual function, his doctor is likely to discuss it with him.

But the same is not true for a woman who has cancer in a sex organ, according to new research. Investigators found 9 in 10 men were asked about their sexual health, yet only 1 in 10 women received the same care.

"There seems to be a big disparity in the way we approach sexual...

Vaccines Have Slashed Rates of HPV Infection in Young American Women

Back in 2006, doctors began recommending the first vaccine for the common sexually transmitted human papillomavirus (HPV), with the shots carrying the potential to lower the risk of certain cancers.

Now, a new study shows the vaccine has been wi...

Cases of Advanced Cervical Cancer Keep Rising Among U.S. Women

New research points to a conundrum with cervical cancer: While rates of early-stage disease have been dropping in the United States ever since the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine was introduced, advanced cases have been on the rise.

Which women are being hit the hardest? The steepest uptick in advanced cer...

When Treating Cervical Lesions, Adding HPV Vaccine Could Further Curb Cancer Risk

Most sexually active people will contract the human papillomavirus (HPV) during their lifetimes, and about 90% will clear it from their bodies. But some women are susceptible to the cervical lesions that infection brings, raising their risk for cervical cancer.

Now, a new review finds it's possible that during surge...

When Genes Raise a Mom's Risk for Cancer, Is It OK to Tell Kids?

It's important to talk to kids about family health risks, but the impact of sharing this kind of information has been unclear.

It's probably safe, according to a new study, but how are you supposed to do it -- and when?

Researchers found that kids generally have no problem coping when cancer risk information is shared with them. But it's not uncommon for parents to struggle with com...

Pandemic Caused Millions of U.S. Women to Skip Cancer Screenings

Millions of U.S. women missed breast, cervical and colon cancer screenings due to the COVID-19 pandemic, according to a new study.

It found that compared to 2018, the number of women in 2020 who said they had breast cancer screening in the past year fell by 2.13 million (6%). The number of women who ...

HPV 'Herd Immunity' Now Helping Vaccinated, Unvaccinated Women

Vaccination against the virus that causes most cervical cancers has spurred a widespread reduction of infections among young Americans - including those who are unvaccinated, a new government study finds.

The study, by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, looked at the impact of the nation's HPV...

Study Finds Just One Dose of HPV Vaccine May Be Enough

A single dose of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine provides as much protection against cervical cancer as the standard three-dose regimen, a new study finds.

"These findings are a game-changer that may substantially reduce the incidence of HPV-attributable cervical cancer, and positions single-dose HPV vaccination as a high-value and high-impact public health intervention that is within ...

COVID-19 Led to Dangerous Delays in Care for Women With Gynecologic Cancers

A COVID-19 diagnosis can lead to potentially life-threatening treatment delays for women with gynecological cancers, a new study finds. That's especially true for non-white patients, the researchers said.

"We found that concurrent COVID-19 had significant negative effects on these cancer patients, especially among those who identified as Black or Asian," said study leader Dr. Gretchen Gla...

Women at Higher Odds for Side Effects From Some Cancer Treatments

Gender differences extend to cancer treatments, with women having a higher risk of severe side effects from certain treatments than men, a new study finds.

Previous research concluded women tend to have more side effects from chemotherapy, and this new paper shows the same is true for

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  • February 15, 2022
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  • Could a Pap Test Help Detect Breast, Ovarian Cancers, Too?

    Pap tests have long been used to detect cervical cancer early, but preliminary research suggests that cervical cells collected during those tests could also be used to catch other cancers, including deadly ovarian tumors.

    Researchers found that by analyzing a particular molecular "signature" in cervical...

    Many Teens Don't Realize STD Risks From Oral Sex: Poll

    Many American teens and young adults underestimate the risk of sexually transmitted infections from unprotected oral sex, and that's especially true of young men, a new survey shows.

    Doctors say oral sex can transmit herpes, gonorrhea, chlamydia, syphilis, HIV and human papillomavirus (HPV), which can lead to cervical cancer, and head and neck cancers.

    While there is an

  • Robert Preidt
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  • February 2, 2022
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  • Progress on Lung Cancer Drives Overall Decline in U.S. Cancer Deaths

    A new report offers hope on the lung cancer front: Patients are being diagnosed at an earlier stage in their disease and living longer due to better access to care, higher screening rates and improved treatments.

    And that is driving overall cancer rates down, researchers discovered.

    Still, lung cancer remai...

    You Can Help Prevent Cervical Cancer

    Cervical cancer is the only gynecologic cancer that can be prevented, yet there were more than 4,000 deaths in the United States in 2021 and nearly 14,500 new cases, the American Cancer Society says.

    The best way to prevent this is to make sure you and your children get their human papillomavirus vaccines, experts noted.

    Nearly all cervical cancer stems from HPV, which will first c...

    HPV Vaccine Is Reducing Cervical Cancers in Teens, Young Women

    The first wave of girls to receive the HPV vaccine are much less likely to contract or die from cervical cancer than women just a few years older, a new study reports.

    Nearly all cases of cervical cancer are caused by human papillomavirus (HPV), for which a vaccine has been available since 2006.

    Cervical cancer deaths and cases have fallen dramatically among 14- to 24-year-old women...

    Could a Single Dose of the HPV Vaccine Be Enough?

    Women getting vaccinated against the cancer-causing human papillomavirus (HPV) now need two or three shots, but an African clinical trial suggests a single dose is just as effective.

    The finding could speed up the immunization process in developing countries with high levels of HPV-related cancers and protect many more women more quickly.

    "These findings are a gamechanger that may s...

    HPV Vaccination Rises in States That Don't Require Parental Consent

    When young people are allowed to give their own consent for human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines, vaccination rates are higher, new research shows.

    The new study suggests that allowing teens to consent without parental involvement could be an important strategy for boosting HPV vaccination rates. This consent is already a policy in several U.S. states.

    While researchers can't say def...

    HPV Vaccination When Young Cuts Cervical Cancer Risk by 87%

    The sooner girls are vaccinated against human papillomavirus (HPV), the lower their future risk of cervical cancer, a new study finds.

    Compared to unvaccinated women, the risk of cervical cancer was 87% lower among those who received the bivalent vaccine Cervarix at ages 12 or 13. By contrast, it was 62% lower in those who got the vaccine at ages 14-16 and 34% lower those vaccinated at ag...

    Your Free Cancer Screen Shows Trouble: What If You Can't Afford the Follow-Up?

    Just over a decade ago, the passage of the Affordable Care Act (ACA, or Obamacare) made many common cancer screenings free. But a pair of new studies caution that when those free tests turn up signs of trouble, important follow-up tests may be too pricey for some patients.

    The bigger concern: Some patients may forgo these expensive tests, even when they may prove lifesaving.

    "With t...

    Cancer in Hispanics: Good News and Bad

    Hispanic people in the United States have lower cancer rates than white people, but they are much more likely to develop certain preventable cancers.

    "The good news is that overall cancer rates are lower in Hispanic people, but we are seeing very high rates of infectious disease-related cancers, many of which are potentially avoidable," said study author Kimberly Miller, a scientist at th...

    Mixed Progress Against Cancers in Teens, Young Adults

    There's some encouraging news for U.S. teens and young adults with cancer.

    Survival rates have improved for several types of cancer, though gains have been limited for some common kinds, according to a long-term study published online July 26 in the journal Cancer.

    The researchers used a wealth of accumulated data "to piece together a larger part of the cancer survival st...

    Most Cancer Screenings Make Big Rebound After Pandemic Decline

    A major U.S. hospital system had a strong rebound in most cancer screening tests after a steep drop-off in the early months of the COVID-19 pandemic, a new study shows.

    The findings are based on an analysis of data from the Boston-based Mass General Brigham system. Depending on the type of test, between March and June of 2020, the number of cancer screenings dropped off between 65% a...

    Cost a Barrier to Cervical Cancer Screening for Many U.S. Women

    Many women in the United States aren't screened for cervical cancer because they can't afford it, a new study finds.

    Screening helps reduce cervical cancer cases and deaths, but disparities in screening rates exist based on income, insurance status, race and ethnicity.

    "Low-income women need greater access to insurance coverage options, Medicaid eligibility, or free screening progra...

    Women's Cancer Screenings Plummeted During Pandemic

    Breast and cervical cancer screenings dropped sharply among low-income minority women during the COVID-19 pandemic, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says.

    That could lead to delayed cancer diagnoses, health consequences and an increase in existing disparities, the agency warned.

    The new findings "reinforce the need to safely maintain routine health care services d...

    Could a DNA Blood Test Spot a Range of Hidden Cancers?

    Could a new one-and-done blood test designed to detect as many as 50 different types of cancer become a diagnostic game changer?

    Yes, say researchers, who report the method appears accurate and reliable at identifying and locating cancer, including some kinds for which there are now no effective screening methods.

    "[The test] sets the stage for a new paradigm of screening individual...

    For People With Heart Failure, Statins May Lower Cancer Risk Too

    Many people with heart failure take a cholesterol-lowering statin, and new research suggests those pills might also lower their odds for cancer.

    Researchers analyzed data from more than 87,000 people in Hong Kong who had no history of cancer and were hospitalized for heart failure between 2003 and 2015.

    They were followed until they were diagnosed with cancer, died or until the end ...

    HPV Vaccination Is Lowering U.S. Cervical Cancer Rates

    In a finding that offers the first evidence that the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine is indeed protecting women from cervical cancer, new research shows cases in the United States have slowly but steadily declined over the last decade and a half.

    However, other HPV-related cancers like anal, rectal and oral tumors continue to increase, suggesting that regular cancer screening also play...

    Urinary Incontinence Surgery Won't Raise a Woman's Cancer Risk

    Women face no increased risk of pelvic cancer -- tumors of the bladder, cervix and ovaries -- if they have surgery to treat stress urinary incontinence (SUI), a new study finds.

    Concerns about possible complications and safety issues related to use of surgical mesh -- particularly for a condition called pelvic organ prolapse, and also for SUI -- have made some patients reluctant to have m...

    HPV Infections Are Plummeting Due to Widespread Vaccination

    Fifteen years of widespread vaccination of U.S. children with the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine is reaping big rewards: A more than 80% drop in new infections has been seen in women and girls under the age of 25.

    That could mean an equally big drop to come in a host of dangerous conditions that are linked to HPV infection, including cancers of the cervix, anogenital area and mouth/th...

    When Heart Attack Strikes, Cancer Patients Often Miss Out on Lifesaving Treatment

    Too few cancer patients who have a heart attack are receiving emergency angioplasties that could save their lives, a new study finds.

    "This is an important study, which underscores the broader issue in cardio-oncology of cancer patients too often being passed over for potentially beneficial procedures," said Dr. Robert Copeland-Halperin, a cardiologist unconnected to the new research.

    ...

    Study Outlines Role of Oral Sex in Rare Throat, Mouth Cancers

    People who began having oral sex at a young age or at greater "intensity" may face an increased risk of a type of throat cancer, a new study finds.

    The study, published online Jan. 11 in the journal Cancer, focused on oropharyngeal cancer caused by human papillomavirus (HPV). The sexually transmitted infection can, in a small number of people, become persistent and lead to cancer...

    Women May Transmit Cancer to Infants in Childbirth, Reports Suggest

    WEDNESDAY, Jan. 6, 2021 -- In extremely rare instances, newborns can contract cancer from their pregnant moms during delivery, a new case report suggests.

    Two boys, a 23-month-old and a 6-year-old, developed lung cancers that proved an exact genetic match to cervical cancers within their mothers at the time of birth, Japanese researchers report.

    It appears that the boys breathed in ...

    Cancer Survivors at Higher Odds for Second Cancer: Study

    Cancer survivors are at greater risk of developing another cancer and dying from it, a new study finds.

    These new cancers can result from a genetic predisposition, from treatments such as radiation and chemotherapy used to fight the first cancer, as well as from unhealthy lifestyles such as smoking and obesity, according to researchers from the American Cancer Society.

    Some of these...

    Obamacare Helped More Americans Spot Cancers Early: Study

    As the Affordable Care Act faces scrutiny once more from the U.S. Supreme Court, new research shows it may be helping to save American lives otherwise lost to cancer.

    The study found that expansions of health insurance coverage through Medicaid -- a feature of Obamacare -- appeared tied to a rise in the number of cancers spotted via screening when they were still early in development. Can...

    HPV Vaccine Proves Its Mettle Against Cervical Cancer

    Girls who are vaccinated against human papillomavirus (HPV) may drastically cut their chances of developing cervical cancer by age 30, a huge, new study finds.

    Researchers found that of more than 1.6 million young Swedish women, those who'd gotten the HPV vaccine were about two-thirds less likely to be diagnosed with cervical cancer than their unvaccinated peers.

    Those odds ...

    American Cancer Society Recommends HPV Test for Cervical Cancer Screening

    An updated guideline from the American Cancer Society calls for more simplified cervical cancer screening, administered less often.

    The new guideline calls for an initial cervix screening at age 25, followed by the human papillomavirus (HPV) test every five years, continuing through age 65, the guideline says.

    "These streamlined recommendations can improve compliance and re...

    Gynecological Cancers Not a Risk for Severe COVID-19: Study

    Despite rampant fears that cancer patients are at higher risk of having severe cases of COVID-19, a new study suggests gynecologic cancers do not boost the chances of hospitalization or death.

    "Our study should be reassuring for women with gynecologic cancers who are worried that having cancer increases their risk of becoming seriously ill if they go to the hospital because of COVID-1...

    More Sex Partners, Higher Cancer Risk?

    If you need more than two hands to count the number of lovers you've had in your life, new research suggests you might want to worry about your cancer risk.

    People who have had 10 or more sexual partners had higher odds of being diagnosed with cancer than those who were less sexually active, researchers report.

    Women with that many sex partners had nearly double the risk of ...

    One Dose of HPV Vaccine May Protect Against Cervical Cancer

    A single dose of the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine works as well as multiple doses to protect older teen girls against preinvasive cervical disease, which can develop into cervical cancer, researchers say.

    For the study, the researchers analyzed data on more than 133,000 females aged 9 to 26. Half weren't vaccinated and half received one or more HPV vaccine doses between January...

    Cervical Cancer Could All But Disappear in North America by 2040

    Vaccination and screening could nearly wipe out cervical cancer in North America in the next 20 years and rid the world of the disease within the next century, researchers say.

    In a new study, the researchers assessed the potential impacts of the World Health Organization's (WHO) draft strategy for cervical cancer elimination, which calls for 90% of girls to be vaccinated against ...

    Progress Against Lung Cancer Fuels Record Drop in U.S. Cancer Deaths

    A 29% drop in U.S. cancer deaths between 1991 and 2017 was driven by declines in deaths from four major cancers -- lung, colon, breast and prostate, according to the latest American Cancer Society (ACS) annual report.

    Cancer deaths in the United States fell 2.2% between 2016 and 2017, the largest-ever single-year decrease.

    That record drop was spurred by a rapid decl...

    Many Girls, Young Women Getting Unnecessary Pelvic Exams

    Many American teen girls and young women under the age of 21 are undergoing pelvic exams and Pap tests they just don't need, a new study finds.

    "Parents of adolescents and young women should be aware that cervical cancer screening is not recommended routinely in this age group," said study senior researcher Dr. George Sawaya. He is professor of obstetrics, gynecology and reproductiv...

    Could 1 Dose of HPV Vaccine Be Enough?

    In a finding that might make the HPV vaccine more palatable to many, new research suggests a single dose may provide just as much protection from cervical cancer as the recommended two to three doses do.

    "The vaccine is extremely effective, and can prevent over 90% of nearly 35,000 cancers caused by HPV every year among men and women," explained study author Ashish Deshmukh. He's ...

    Studies Confirm HPV Shot Is Safe

    The HPV vaccine gives parents a chance to prevent their children from developing some types of cancer, and two new studies reaffirm what past research has found -- the vaccine is safe.

    The two studies included millions of doses of Gardasil 9 vaccine, the only vaccine currently used in the United States for the prevention of HPV-related cancers.

    "The data from our study was...

    Self-Testing for Cervical Cancer Increases Screening Rates

    Mailing self-sampling kits to test for the cervical cancer-causing virus HPV significantly increased screening rates for the cancer, according to a new study.

    The research included nearly 20,000 women in the Kaiser Permanente Washington (state) system who hadn't been screened for cervical cancer in more than three years.

    About half got an HPV (human papillomavirus) self-samp...

    Aging Population, Unhealthy Habits Underlie Expected Cancer Surge

    Due to population growth and aging, the number of cancer cases worldwide is expected to jump 60% by 2040 -- but unhealthy lifestyle habits are likely to make the surge even larger.

    That's the conclusion from the new edition of the Cancer Atlas, unveiled Wednesday at the World Cancer Leaders' Summit in Nur-Sultan, Kazakhstan. It notes that unhealthy habits such as smoking, p...

    Where Women's Health Clinics Close, Cervical Cancer Outcomes Worsen

    As government funding dried up and many women's health clinics across America closed, cervical cancer screening rates fell and deaths from the disease rose, a new report shows.

    Nearly 100 women's health clinics in the United States closed between 2010 and 2013, researchers said -- often due to the passage of more restrictive laws or the loss of Title X government funding.

    In...

    Most Americans in the Dark About Cancer-Causing HPV, Survey Finds

    Among Americans aged 18 to 26, two-thirds of men and one-third of women still do not know that the human papillomavirus (HPV) is the leading cause of cervical cancer, a new survey finds.

    The survey findings also showed that more than 70% of American adults don't know that the common sexually transmitted infection can cause anal, penile and oral cancers.

    The findings come...

    Study Points to Herd Immunity Against HPV in Unvaccinated U.S. Adults

    The United States could be approaching a state of herd immunity against human papillomavirus (HPV), a virus linked to several cancers.

    Oral HPV infections declined by 37% among unvaccinated 18- to 59-year-old men between 2009 and 2016, according to a Sept. 10 report in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

    That included a decline in infections of HPV16, the...

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