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Are Retired NFL Players Aging Faster Than Other Men?

Former elite football players may age faster than their more average peers, a new study suggests.

NFL players, especially former linemen, had fewer disease-free years and earlier high blood pressure and diabetes diagnoses. Two age-related diseases, arthritis and dementia, were also more commonly found in former football players than in other men of the same age.

This research was p...

Brain Waves Could Help Guide Concussion Diagnosis, Treatment

A particular brain wave may help diagnose concussions in high school football players and predict when it's safe for them to return to play, new research suggests.

Delta waves are markers of brain injury and perhaps healing. They tend to decrease with age, but researchers found increased levels of these lo...

Curbing Football Drills Could Make High School Football Safer

Tackling drills are typically a staple of high school football practices, but new research suggests dropping them from training might cut the risk of head hits.

Using mouth guards with sensors that recorded every head hit, researchers found players who spent 5,144 minutes in non-contact practice had just 310 head hits, while those who had nearly 7,000 minutes in high-speed training with c...

Prestigious Sports Medicine Journal Retracts  Articles Authored by Former Editor-in-Chief

A leading medical journal, the British Journal of Sports Medicine, has retracted nine more articles written by its former editor-in-chief and applied “expressions of concern” on 38 additional articles on which he is the sole author that were published in BMJ journals.

This is the latest development in the investigation, which concerns possible plagiarism and misrep...

Could Synthetic Turf Raise Kids' Odds for Injuries, Concussions?

At some schools, grassy sports fields have been replaced by easier-to-maintain synthetic turf.

But it turns out that may be more likely to cause player injuries.

Noting that synthetic turf football fields have been associated with more ankle and knee injuries, medical stude...

Retired Pro Rugby Players Face More Than Double the Odds for Brain Illnesses

New research suggests you can add rugby players to the list of professional athletes who face a significantly heightened risk of brain diseases following years of intense contact play.

“This latest work under our FIELD program of research demonstrates that risk of

  • By Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • October 7, 2022
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  • In Boxers and MMA Fighters, Brain May Make Some Recovery After Retirement

    Professional fighters take a lot of knocks to the head, but a new study suggests they may find themselves thinking more clearly again after they retire.

    Many studies have pointed to the perils of repeated blows to the head in sports like boxing and football.

  • Amy Norton HealthDay Reporter
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  • September 15, 2022
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  • Concussion Aftermath Could Drag Down Teens' Grades

    Efforts to prevent concussions from happening at school or school-related sports activities may help keep teens from lagging behind on their academics.

    In a new study, researchers at the University of Washington found that those who had a recent

  • By Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • September 14, 2022
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  • School Sports Are Starting Again: Know the Signs of Concussion

    As high school sports get underway this fall, sports medicine specialists remind athletes, parents and coaches that concussions can be challenging to diagnose.

    Dr. Sean Bradley, a primary care sports medicine physician at Ochsn...

    Helmets Protect Young Lacrosse Players, Study Finds

    A rule requiring high school girls who play lacrosse to wear protective headgear is paying big dividends in Florida.

    Their risk of concussion is lower than that of players in states without such a mandate,

  • By Marianne (Consumer)Madeiros HealthDay Reporter
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  • August 25, 2022
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  • First Major League Soccer Player Is Diagnosed With CTE

    When former professional Major League Soccer (MLS) player Scott Vermillion died at age 44, he had stage 2 CTE, his family announced Tuesday.

    He is the first former MLS player diagnosed with chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). Vermillion died from an accidental overdose in December 2020.

    "Th...

    Veterans May Face Lower Risk for CTE Than Ex-Athletes

    A degenerative brain condition uncovered in some former professional athletes has been reported in military veterans as well, but a new study suggests it's uncommon and questions whether service itself confers the risk.

    At issue is a condition called chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), a form of p...

    Mixed Martial Arts Fighters Show Signs of Brain Changes

    The football gridiron and the boxing ring have come to be understood as danger zones for the brain, with repetitive hits to the head causing long-term damage to some athletes.

    The same might be true of the MMA octagon as well, a new study says.

    The more that participants in mixed martial arts spar in ...

    Former College Football Players Suffer More Brain Disorders as They Age

    College football players live longer than those who didn't play, but they suffer more brain-related issues as they age, a new study finds.

    Among former Notre Dame football players, being physically fit was tied to lower deaths from heart disease and diabetes. But the former players were five times more likely to have impaired thinking and memory ("cognition") and 2.5 times more likely to ...

    Are Standard Tests Accurate at Spotting Concussion?

    Outdoor sports season is nearly here, and with rough play comes the risk of concussion.

    But one of the most-used tools to assess sports-related concussion from the sidelines isn't as precise as one might like, a new study a...

    Half of Americans Now Think Playing Football 'Inappropriate' for Kids: Survey

    As sign-ups for youth football get underway this spring, a new study reveals that Americans may love their football, but half now believe that kids should not play the tackle version of the game.

    The researchers found that of nearly 4,000 U.S. adults surveyed, only 45% agreed that tackle football is an "appropriate sport for kids to play." Half disagreed, while the remaining 5% were unsur...

    Head Bump? Here's Signs You Need ER Care

    Knowing the signs of brain injury and when to seek emergency care could save a life, an expert says.

    "The brain is the body's command center," said Dr. Gillian Schmitz, president of the American College of Emergency Physicians. "One of the smartest ways to protect it is to be able to spot the signs of a brain injury and to go to the closest emergency department when you need medical atten...

    Odds for Mental Illness Rise in Kids After Concussion

    Kids who've suffered a concussion are at heightened risk of mental health issues in the aftermath, a large new study suggests.

    The researchers found that compared with their peers, children and teenagers with a past concussion were 39% more likely to be diagnosed with a mental health condition - including anxiety disorders, depression and behavioral disorders. They were also at greater ri...

    More Years Playing Hockey, Higher Odds for CTE Linked to Head Injury

    Researchers already know that repeated hits to the head on the football field are linked to a degenerative brain disease, as seen in a number of retired NFL stars. Now, experts have turned their attention to ice hockey, another high-contact sport.

    When studying whether the hits, year after year, can also be linked to

    Concussion's Impact on Memory, Thinking May Linger More Than a Year

    A person's memory and thinking abilities can still be affected a year after suffering a concussion, a new study finds.

    The results suggest that poor mental ("cognitive") outcomes may be more common than once thought, said study author Dr. Raquel Gardner of the University of California, San Francisco.

    <...

    Soccer Headers May Disrupt Key 'Pathways' in the Brain

    Soccer headers are a staple of scoring in any match, but new research suggests that the practice can harm what experts called "signaling pathways" in the brain.

    The findings are based on analyses of blood samples from 89 professional soccer players, aged 18 to 35, in Norway.

    The blood samples were taken when the players were at rest and one hour and 12 hours after three situations: ...

    Brain Injuries May Be Driving Higher Death Rate for U.S. Veterans

    At one time, military veterans were typically healthier than the average American. But a new study finds that vets who have served since 9/11 have higher than average death rates -- especially those with a history of brain injury.

    The

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  • February 16, 2022
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  • Getting Active Soon After Concussion May Aid Kids' Recovery

    A return to non-contact physical activity three days after a concussion is safe and possibly even beneficial for kids, a Canadian clinical trial finds.

    "Gone are the days of resting in a dark room," said study co-author Andrée-Anne Ledoux, a scientist at the Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario Research Institute in Ottawa, Canada.

    The

  • Robert Preidt
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  • February 2, 2022
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  • Many Kids Aren't Wearing Helmets While Sledding, Poll Finds

    When American kids do downhill skiing or snowboarding, they almost always wear a helmet, their parents say, but they're far less likely to do so when cruising down a neighborhood hill on a sled.

    That puts them at risk for serious head injuries, experts warn.

    "Because sledding is so common, parents may overlook ...

    Hit Your Head? Look for These Warning Signs of Concussion

    If you or someone you know has suffered a concussion, a medical evaluation is crucial, an expert says.

    A concussion is "a short-lived functional brain injury typically caused by a bump or blow to the head," Cleveland Clinic con...

    Study Finds No Ties Between Youth Tackle Football, Brain/Behavioral Issues

    Many parents struggle with the decision to let their kids play tackle football or other contact sports due to the risk of concussions and long-term brain diseases that may occur with repeated head blows.

    Now, new...

    NFL Players Face 4 Times the Odds of ALS

    NFL players are four times more likely to die of Lou Gehrig's disease (ALS) than other people, new research finds, adding to known links between football-related head injuries and brain diseases, including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE).

    And the longer they played football, the greater their risk, the new study found.

    ALS, or

  • Denise Mann HealthDay Reporter
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  • December 16, 2021
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  • MRI Might Spot Concussion-Linked CTE in Living Patients

    Right now, the devastating concussion-linked brain condition known as chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) can only be diagnosed after death via autopsy. But new research could help change that, allowing doctors to someday spot the illness earlier.

    According to the new study, MRI may be able to detect CTE while people are still alive.

    "While this finding is not yet ready for the c...

    Nearly 7% of U.S. Kids Have Had a Head Injury or Concussion

    Blows to the head are common among America's kids, with close to 7% showing signs of a brain injury at some time in childhood, U.S. health officials report.

    Sports, falls and abuse are likely causes, experts say.

    Concussions and other head injuries are more common among white kids than Black or Hispanic kids. And prevalence increases with age -- from 2% in children up to 5 years ol...

    More Years Playing Football, More Brain Lesions on MRI: Study

    Repetitive head hits are common in football, and they're also linked to debilitating brain injuries.

    But rendering a definitive diagnosis typically means waiting for autopsy results after the player has died.

    Now, a new study suggests that brain scans can reliably spot troubling signs of sports-inflicted neurological damage while a person is still alive.

    The research also show...

    Exercise, Not Bed Rest, Can Speed Concussion Recovery

    Contrary to long-held wisdom, teen athletes recover from concussions sooner if they do light aerobic exercise rather than resting in a dark room, new research suggests.

    Instead of so-called "cocoon therapy," new research-supported therapy has young concussion patients getting out of bed and doing protected exercise earlier.

    "What the research found was that adolescents were having a...

    Month-Long Recovery From Concussion Is Normal: Study

    College athletes who suffer a concussion may take as long as a month to recover, not the two weeks considered normal, new research finds.

    "Normal return-to-play time was previously set at 14 days -- meaning 50% of people recovered in that time," said lead researcher Steve Broglio. He is director of the University of Michigan Concussion Center in Ann Arbor. "Our paper suggests that 28 days...

    Why Are Sports-Linked Concussions Rising Among Girls?

    Sports-related head injuries in male athletes tend to grab all of the headlines, but new research shows that female athletes are also increasingly at risk.

    From 2000 to 2019, there was a threefold jump in sports-linked concussions seen among high school-aged girls. These injuries were most likely to occur during soccer, basketball, cheerleading, softball and volleyball, but they also happ...

    When Are Head Injury Risks Highest for Young Soccer Players?

    Young soccer players have more head impacts during practices but experience more severe head impacts during games, a small, preliminary study shows.

    The findings could help devise ways to improve head impact safety in youth soccer, according to the researchers.

    "Headers are a fundamental component to the sport of soccer. Therefore, it is important to understand differences in header...

    Strict Rest Not Recommended After Sports-Linked Concussion, Experts Say

    Strict rest isn't advised after athletes suffer a concussion because it could slow their recovery, an updated consensus statement from a U.S. expert panel says.

    Most adult athletes fully recover within two weeks and children within four, according to the statement published June 15 in the British Journal of Sports Medicine.

    The number and severity of initial symptoms are th...

    Is Zinc a Friend or Foe to Kidney Stones?

    The nutrient zinc can be both helpful and harmful when it comes to kidney stones, a new study finds.

    There have been two conflicting theories about the link between zinc and kidney stones. One suggests zinc stops the growth of the calcium oxalate crystals that make up the stones. The other suggests zinc changes the crystals' surfaces, which encourages further growth.

    Turns ...

    New Insights Into Treating Mild Head Injuries

    It may be possible to treat the thinking problems that result from repeated hits to the head, a new laboratory study suggests.

    The new experiments with mice are the first to offer a molecular analysis of what happens in the brain after repetitive but mild blows to the head, said researcher Mark Burns. He is head of the Laboratory for Brain Injury and Dementia at Georgetown University, in ...

    1 in 4 U.S. Teens Has Had a Concussion: Study

    Nearly one in four American teens has suffered at least one concussion, according to new research.

    And though more teens are self-reporting sports-related concussions, visits to the emergency room for these traumatic head injuries fell between 2012 and 2018.

    "One reason that could explain why adolescents who participate in sports saw an increase in self-reported concussion could be ...

    Head Injury, Alzheimer's Appear to Affect Brain in Similar Ways

    Alzheimer's disease and traumatic brain injury appear to affect the brain in similar ways, according to a study that may point to new ways to identify people at high risk for Alzheimer's.

    "These findings are the first to suggest that cognitive impairment following a traumatic brain injury is useful for predicting the magnitude of Alzheimer's-like brain degradation," said study author Andr...

    High School Football Doesn't Affect Brain in Middle Age, Study Says

    Here's some good news for aging athletes: If you played high school football, you're no more likely than others to have problems with concentration, memory or depression in middle age, according to a new study.

    "Men who played high school football did not report worse brain health compared with those who played other contact sports, noncontact sports, or did not participate in sports dur...

    It's a Scream: Human Brains Alert to Positive Shrieks

    Screams have different meanings, and you're likely to respond quicker to screams of joy than to those of anger or fear, a new study suggests.

    Previous research has largely focused on screams triggered by alarm or fear.

    In this study, a team from the University of Zurich in Switzerland examined the meaning behind different human screams and identified six emotionally distinct types: ...

    Women More Prone to Concussion's Long-Term Harms: Study

    After a concussion, women may be at heightened risk of lasting physical and mental symptoms, a new study finds.

    The study of 2,000 concussion sufferers found that women were more likely than men to still have some symptoms one year later. The problems included fuzzy memory and difficulty concentrating, as well as headaches, dizziness or fatigue.

    In contrast, women and men showed sim...

    Which Kids' Sports Have Higher Odds for Head Injury?

    Researchers outfitted high school athletes with head impact sensors to see which of four popular sports put them at the greatest risk of concussion.

    No. 1 for both boys and girls: Soccer, according to a study published online recently in the Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine. Blame it on intentional headers, which accounted for 80% of head impacts in that sport.

    "Provi...

    Even 1 Concussion May Raise Your Odds for Dementia Later

    Sustaining just one head injury may up your chances of developing dementia decades later by 25%, and this risk increases with each subsequent head injury, new research suggests.

    "Head injury is not the only risk factor for dementia as high blood pressure and diabetes, among others, also contribute significantly to dementia risk, but head injury is one risk factor for dementia that is modi...

    AHA News: Why Did Yankees Manager Get a Pacemaker, and How Does It Work?

    With each beat of your heart, the muscle squeezes, feeding blood to the rest of your body. The squeeze is triggered by an electrical impulse.

    Sometimes, though, a glitch slows that impulse. This can cause lightheadedness, low energy and shortness of breath.

    New York Yankees manager Aaron Boone felt those symptoms. Doctors traced them to a slow heart rate, and on Wednesday they addre...

    Add Sleep Woes to Long-Term Effects of Concussions

    Concussions can increase the long-term risk of a wide range of sleep disorders, a new study indicates.

    Researchers looked at more than 98,700 U.S. veterans diagnosed with a traumatic brain injury (TBI) and the same number of veterans with no history of TBI. The brain injuries ranged from mild TBI (concussion) to severe.

    None of the participants had sleep disorders at the start of th...

    Sports Position Doesn't Affect Risk of Concussion-Linked CTE Illness

    The position played in sports like football and hockey isn't associated with risk of a concussion-linked brain disease later in life, a new study suggests.

    The number of years played doesn't affect risk of the neurodegenerative disease -- chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) -- either, researchers found.

    CTE has been linked with repeated blows to the head. Symptoms include behavio...

    Concussions More Likely in Practice Than Play for College Football Players

    College football players suffer more concussions and head hits in practice than they do actually playing the game, a new study suggests.

    Across five seasons of football, 72% of concussions and 67% of head impacts incurred by players on six National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I teams happened during practice rather than on game day, researchers found.

    The inciden...

    Nearly Half of Teens Get Behind the Wheel Shortly After a Concussion

    Driving is a high-risk behavior for teenagers under ordinary circumstances, but new research shows that many who have experienced a concussion may be returning to the road too soon.

    Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) and the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing (Penn Nursing) found that about 47% of teen drivers included in the study returned to driving within two weeks of...

    Football-Loving States Drop The Ball on Concussion: Study

    States with strong football cultures have often fumbled measures to protect young players who've suffered concussions, researchers say.

    They analyzed youth concussion laws introduced by states between 2007 and 2014, specifically guidelines requiring a 24-hour delay before sending a player with a possible concussion back onto the field.

    The researchers found that states with college ...