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As Many as 1.6 Million Americans Lost Sense of Smell Due to COVID-19

THURSDAY, Nov. 18, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Lyss Stern lost her sense of smell when she was diagnosed with COVID-19 in March 2020, and it still hasn't returned.

Stern, 47, a New York City author and mother, has seen countless doctors and taken many types of medicine, vitamins and supplements to get her sense of smell back. She also undergoes acupuncture regularly and sa...

How Folks Are Coping With Post-COVID Loss of Smell, Taste

People who've lost their ability to smell and taste due to COVID-19 have significant struggles, but they can find ways to cope with their situation, a new study shows.

One of the most common side effects of COVID-19 is the loss of the sense of smell, which severely affects the sense of taste. This can lead to anxiety, depression and reduced quality of life.

In this study, five women...

When COVID Triggers Loss of Smell, Younger Patients Recover It Sooner

Most adults who lose smell or taste due to COVID-19 infection regain those senses within months, but a quick recovery is more likely in those under 40, a new study finds.

It included 798 participants in an ongoing survey who reported a loss of either sense after testing positive for COVID.

Here's How COVID-19 Can Affect Your Mouth

A lost or altered sense of taste, dry mouth and sores are common among COVID-19 patients and those symptoms may last long after others disappear, Brazilian researchers report.

Nearly 4 in 10 COVID patients experience impaired taste or total loss of taste, but dry mouth affects even more -- up to 43%, according to their broad review of more than 180 published studies.

It looked at o...

Smoggy Air Might Help Spur Sinusitis

Air pollution could cause sinus misery, new research suggests.

Specifically, tiny particulate air pollution (known as PM2.5) could contribute to chronic rhinosinusitis, a condition in which the sinuses get infected or irritated, become swollen, are severely congested and secrete mucus into the throat for 12 weeks or more.

"To our knowledge, this is the first study to report that lon...

Lost Sense of Smell Returns for Almost All COVID Survivors

A year on, nearly all patients in a French study who lost their sense of smell after a bout of COVID-19 did regain that ability, researchers report.

"Persistent COVID-19-related anosmia [loss of smell] has an excellent prognosis, with nearly complete recovery at one year," according to a team led by Dr. Marion Renaud, an otorhinolaryngologist at the University Hospitals of Strasbourg.

...

Smog Might Damage Your Sense of Smell

Breathing in tiny particles of air pollution over a long period of time may put your sense of smell at risk, a new study suggests.

Researchers found the risk for loss of smell - a condition called anosmia - was nearly doubled among people with lengthy exposure to this type of air pollution, known as particulate matter.

"It's curious that the entire group who had lost th...

Are Some Foods Super Bitter to You? You Might Have Lower COVID Risk

If you can't stand broccoli, celery or kale, you may be a supertaster, and it just might protect you from COVID-19.

Supertasters are folks who are highly sensitive to bitterness. They're not only less likely to get COVID-19 than people who aren't so sensitive to sharp, pungent flavors, they're also less likely to wind up hospitalized with it, the researchers said.

What's more, super...

Nothing to Sniff at: Depression Common for People With COVID-Linked Smell Loss

Loss of the sense of smell and taste is often an early and enduring symptom of COVID-19. Now, research suggests that for many COVID survivors with long-term sensory loss, it's also depressing.

In a web-based survey completed by 322 adults with COVID and a sudden change in smell or taste, 56% reported decreased enjoyment in life and 43% admitted feeling depressed after losing their sense ...

New Coronavirus Can Also Infect Cells in the Mouth

Add another part of your body to the list of what COVID-19 can invade: New research shows mouth cells can be infected with the new coronavirus.

Previous studies have shown that the coronavirus infects the upper airways and lungs, the digestive system, blood vessels and kidneys, which may explain the wide-ranging symptoms experienced by COVID-19 patients.

Those symptoms include loss ...

No Sense of Smell After COVID? Therapies Can Help Bring It Back

So, you had COVID-19 a few months back and you still can't smell that first steaming cup of coffee in the morning. Is there anything you can do to hasten the return of that vital sense?

Experts say there is, including "physical therapy" for your nose.

"In most cases, smell loss is temporary, but it can take months or even years to recover," said researcher Dr. Tran Locke. She's an a...

A Third of COVID Survivors Have Long-Haul Symptoms, Even After Mild Cases

Many patients with mild to moderate COVID-19 could become "long haulers," suffering symptoms months after they clear their non-life-threatening infection, new research shows.

About 33% of COVID-19 patients who were never sick enough to require hospitalization continue to complain months later of symptoms like fatigue, loss of smell or taste and "brain fog," University of Washington (UW) r...

I've Lost My Sense of Smell: Is It COVID?

While loss of smell is a symptom of COVID-19, don't panic -- there are a variety of other possible causes, one expert says.

"It can be due to nasal or sinus inflammation, or other viral infections distinct from COVID-19," explained Dr. Bobby Tajudeen, director of rhinology, sinus surgery and skull base surgery at Rush University Medical Center in Chicago.

"And it can even occur as a...

'Smell Training' Might Speed the Sense's Return After COVID

Special training may help COVID-19 patients regain their sense of smell after suffering parosmia, a new British study suggests.

Parosmia is a condition where people have strange and often unpleasant smell distortions. Instead of smelling a lemon, for example, you may smell rotting cabbage, or chocolate may smell like gasoline. Parosmia has been linked to COVID-19 and other viruses and hea...

Loss of Smell More Common in COVID-19 Than Thought

Loss of smell is common in COVID-19, but fewer people say they have this symptom than objective tests reveal, a new study finds.

In fact, about 77% of COVID-19 patients who were directly measured had smell loss, but only 44% said they did, researchers found.

Direct measures of smell involve having patients smell and report on actual odors, while self-reporting incl...

Fading Sense of Smell Could Signal Higher Death Risk in Older Adults

If you're a senior who can't smell onions, smoke, chocolate or natural gas, it's time to see your doctor.

Seniors who lose their sense of smell -- which doctors call olfactory dysfunction -- have higher odds of dying from all causes within five years, new research shows. Scientists had previously found a link between olfactory dysfunction and impaired thinking and memory.

"We ...

Sweet-Tooth Tendencies Change as Kids Get Older: Study

Young people seldom say a food or drink is "too sweet." A new study suggests that may be because they're less sensitive to sugar than adults and prefer more of it.

Researchers found that compared to adults, kids and teens needed 40% more sugar in a solution to detect sweetness.

The researchers also found that young people have a bigger "sweet tooth" than adults, or prefe...

Loss of Smell, Taste Might Be Long-Term for Some COVID-19 Survivors

Since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, it's become clear that many people with the infection lose their sense of smell and taste. And doctors are concerned that some will never get back to normal.

At this point, it's hard to know how common the symptom is. First, there were anecdotal reports of COVID-19 patients who had lost their ability to smell or taste, said Dr. Nicholas Rowan,...

Smell Diminishes by Day 3 of COVID-19, Study Says

Sense of smell most often diminishes by the third day of infection with the new coronavirus, and many patients also lose their sense of taste at the same time, a new study finds.

The findings may help identify patients most likely to benefit from antiviral treatment, according to the researchers.

"The relationship between decreased sense of smell and the rest of the COVID-19...

Loss of Smell May Signal Milder Case of COVID-19: Study

Loss of smell is more likely to occur in patients with mild to moderate COVID-19 than in those with more severe illness, a new study finds.

This information could give health care providers an early indication of which patients may require hospitalization, according to the University of California, San Diego Health researchers.

"One of the immediate challenges for health car...

A Surprising Way to Make a Sweet Treat Taste Even Sweeter

Like your sweets really sweet? Try enjoying them with a cup o' joe.

Coffee makes sweet foods taste even sweeter, a new study shows.

European researchers tested 156 volunteers' sense of taste and smell before and after they drank coffee. Their sensitivity to smell didn't change, but coffee did heighten their sense of taste.

And this was true whether they dra...

Loss of Sense of Smell Could Be Early Sign of Coronavirus Infection

Here's a clue that you may have coronavirus that might surprise you: a loss of your sense of smell.

Groups representing ear, nose and throat (ENT) specialists in Britain and the United States have issued guidances that a sudden loss of a person's sense of smell may be a sign of infection with the new coronavirus.

It's not a completely unexpected finding, since a temporary in...

Losing Sense of Smell Can Worsen Life in Many Ways: Study

Could you imagine not being able to smell bacon frying, or freshly cut grass, or the presence of smoke?

People who lose their sense of smell face difficulties that can affect their daily lives and put their health and safety at risk, a new British study suggests.

It included 71 patients, ages 31 to 80, who lost their sense of smell. They reported a number of problems -- from...

Think You Only Smell With Your Nose? You're Wrong

A boy who wondered if snakes flick their tongues to smell prompted a surprising new discovery about how human senses work.

Turns out your tongue helps you smell, according to researchers at the Monell Chemical Senses Center in Philadelphia -- a team that included the curious 12-year-old's dad.

Taste and smell had been thought to be independent senses that didn't interact un...

Can't Taste Anything? You Might Want to Check Your Nose

Don't blame a loss of taste on your mouth, new research suggests.

Instead, most people can thank their nose for the problem, the study authors said.

The research team at the Virginia Commonwealth University's Smell and Taste Disorders Center examined the records of 358 patients who were evaluated for a taste disorder or combined taste/smell disorder between 1980 and 2017.