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22 Jun

Big Jump in HPV Vaccination Among Teens, Study Finds

More than 75% of kids 13-17 years old now have at least one dose of the HPV vaccine, researchers say.

Health News Results - 54

Vaccines Have Slashed Rates of HPV Infection in Young American Women

Back in 2006, doctors began recommending the first vaccine for the common sexually transmitted human papillomavirus (HPV), with the shots carrying the potential to lower the risk of certain cancers.

Now, a new study shows the vaccine has been wi...

Cases of Advanced Cervical Cancer Keep Rising Among U.S. Women

New research points to a conundrum with cervical cancer: While rates of early-stage disease have been dropping in the United States ever since the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine was introduced, advanced cases have been on the rise.

Which women are being hit the hardest? The steepest uptick in advanced cer...

When Treating Cervical Lesions, Adding HPV Vaccine Could Further Curb Cancer Risk

Most sexually active people will contract the human papillomavirus (HPV) during their lifetimes, and about 90% will clear it from their bodies. But some women are susceptible to the cervical lesions that infection brings, raising their risk for cervical cancer.

Now, a new review finds it's possible that during surge...

U.S. HPV Vaccination Rates Rising, Even Among Boys

More and more of America's teens are getting vaccinated against the human papillomavirus virus (HPV), new research indicates.

Between 2015 and 2020, the study found, the percentage of 13- to 17-year...

HPV 'Herd Immunity' Now Helping Vaccinated, Unvaccinated Women

Vaccination against the virus that causes most cervical cancers has spurred a widespread reduction of infections among young Americans - including those who are unvaccinated, a new government study finds.

The study, by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, looked at the impact of the nation's HPV...

Study Finds Just One Dose of HPV Vaccine May Be Enough

A single dose of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine provides as much protection against cervical cancer as the standard three-dose regimen, a new study finds.

"These findings are a game-changer that may substantially reduce the incidence of HPV-attributable cervical cancer, and positions single-dose HPV vaccination as a high-value and high-impact public health intervention that is within ...

Many Teens Don't Realize STD Risks From Oral Sex: Poll

Many American teens and young adults underestimate the risk of sexually transmitted infections from unprotected oral sex, and that's especially true of young men, a new survey shows.

Doctors say oral sex can transmit herpes, gonorrhea, chlamydia, syphilis, HIV and human papillomavirus (HPV), which can lead to cervical cancer, and head and neck cancers.

While there is an

  • Robert Preidt
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  • February 2, 2022
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  • Full Page
  • You Can Help Prevent Cervical Cancer

    Cervical cancer is the only gynecologic cancer that can be prevented, yet there were more than 4,000 deaths in the United States in 2021 and nearly 14,500 new cases, the American Cancer Society says.

    The best way to prevent this is to make sure you and your children get their human papillomavirus vaccines, experts noted.

    Nearly all cervical cancer stems from HPV, which will first c...

    HPV Vaccination Could Rid U.S. of Most Mouth, Throat Cancers in Men

    How do you prevent nearly 1 million cases of mouth and throat cancers in American men in this century? Find a way to reach an 80% HPV vaccination rate among adolescents, a new study suggests.

    HPV vaccination protects against the human papillomavirus (HPV), which is the leading cause of cancer in the oropharynx. It's...

    Throat Cancers Tied to HPV Are Rising Among U.S. Men, Women

    You might have heard a lot about the human papillomavirus (HPV) and its role in cervical cancer, but this sexually transmitted virus can also cause another type of cancer.

    Rates of oropharyngeal cancer, which occurs in the middle part of the throat, are rising rapidly among older men throughout the United States. They're also growing among women in the Southeast and Midwest.

    Investi...

    HPV Vaccine Is Reducing Cervical Cancers in Teens, Young Women

    The first wave of girls to receive the HPV vaccine are much less likely to contract or die from cervical cancer than women just a few years older, a new study reports.

    Nearly all cases of cervical cancer are caused by human papillomavirus (HPV), for which a vaccine has been available since 2006.

    Cervical cancer deaths and cases have fallen dramatically among 14- to 24-year-old women...

    Could a Single Dose of the HPV Vaccine Be Enough?

    Women getting vaccinated against the cancer-causing human papillomavirus (HPV) now need two or three shots, but an African clinical trial suggests a single dose is just as effective.

    The finding could speed up the immunization process in developing countries with high levels of HPV-related cancers and protect many more women more quickly.

    "These findings are a gamechanger that may s...

    HPV Vaccination Rises in States That Don't Require Parental Consent

    When young people are allowed to give their own consent for human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines, vaccination rates are higher, new research shows.

    The new study suggests that allowing teens to consent without parental involvement could be an important strategy for boosting HPV vaccination rates. This consent is already a policy in several U.S. states.

    While researchers can't say def...

    HPV Vaccination When Young Cuts Cervical Cancer Risk by 87%

    The sooner girls are vaccinated against human papillomavirus (HPV), the lower their future risk of cervical cancer, a new study finds.

    Compared to unvaccinated women, the risk of cervical cancer was 87% lower among those who received the bivalent vaccine Cervarix at ages 12 or 13. By contrast, it was 62% lower in those who got the vaccine at ages 14-16 and 34% lower those vaccinated at ag...

    Your Free Cancer Screen Shows Trouble: What If You Can't Afford the Follow-Up?

    Just over a decade ago, the passage of the Affordable Care Act (ACA, or Obamacare) made many common cancer screenings free. But a pair of new studies caution that when those free tests turn up signs of trouble, important follow-up tests may be too pricey for some patients.

    The bigger concern: Some patients may forgo these expensive tests, even when they may prove lifesaving.

    "With t...

    HPV Infection Tied to Higher Odds of Premature Delivery

    Pregnant women infected with certain strains of human papillomavirus (HPV) may have a heightened risk of preterm birth, a new study suggests.

    HPV is a sexually transmitted disease that can cause genital warts. Most of the time, the immune system clears the infection. But some strains of HPV become persistent in a minority of people -- and, over time, may lead to certain cancers.

    In ...

    HPV Vaccination Is Lowering U.S. Cervical Cancer Rates

    In a finding that offers the first evidence that the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine is indeed protecting women from cervical cancer, new research shows cases in the United States have slowly but steadily declined over the last decade and a half.

    However, other HPV-related cancers like anal, rectal and oral tumors continue to increase, suggesting that regular cancer screening also play...

    Too Few Young Men Have Gotten the HPV Vaccine

    The HPV vaccine isn't reaching enough young American men, researchers report.

    The vaccine protects against reproductive warts as well as cancers caused by human papillomavirus (HPV), the most common sexually transmitted infection in the United States.

    Many young women get the HPV vaccine to help protect them against cervical cancer, but numbers are much lower among young men, the Mi...

    HPV Infections Are Plummeting Due to Widespread Vaccination

    Fifteen years of widespread vaccination of U.S. children with the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine is reaping big rewards: A more than 80% drop in new infections has been seen in women and girls under the age of 25.

    That could mean an equally big drop to come in a host of dangerous conditions that are linked to HPV infection, including cancers of the cervix, anogenital area and mouth/th...

    Many Babies Acquire Oral HPV, Probably From Mom

    Cancer-causing human papillomavirus (HPV) is considered a sexually transmitted infection, but a new study shows that many babies are born carrying the virus in their mouths.

    "In brief, HPV infection can be acquired at early age or even at birth," said lead researcher Dr. Stina Syrjanen, head of oral pathology and oral radiology with the University of Turku's Institute of Dentistry in...

    More Parents Balking at Giving Kids Cancer-Fighting HPV Vaccine

    Although more teens are getting the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, parents' hesitancy is growing, a new study finds.

    From 2012 to 2018, more doctors recommended their patients get vaccinated with the HPV vaccine -- from 27% to 49%. But at the same time, the number of parents who were reluctant to have their kids vaccinated increased from 50% to 64%, researchers found.

    "Overall,...

    Vaccines Saved 37 Million Lives, Mostly Children, Over Past Two Decades

    They're medical miracles: A new report finds that vaccines against 10 major diseases prevented 37 million deaths between 2000 and 2019 in low- and middle-income countries worldwide, with young children benefiting most.

    Vaccinations are also projected to prevent a total of 69 million deaths between 2000 and 2030, researchers say.

    Their modeling study also shows that vaccination again...

    1 in 5 Americans Has an STD: CDC

    According to 2018 data, one in five people in the United States probably carries a sexually transmitted infection, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says.

    On any given day in 2018, nearly 68 million people had a sexually transmitted disease, according to the new CDC report. There were 26 million new cases that year. The agency refers to these diseases -- such as HIV, sy...

    Study Outlines Role of Oral Sex in Rare Throat, Mouth Cancers

    People who began having oral sex at a young age or at greater "intensity" may face an increased risk of a type of throat cancer, a new study finds.

    The study, published online Jan. 11 in the journal Cancer, focused on oropharyngeal cancer caused by human papillomavirus (HPV). The sexually transmitted infection can, in a small number of people, become persistent and lead to cancer...

    Facebook Posts Big Drivers in Vaccine Resistance, Study Finds

    As Americans await their COVID-19 shot, a new study of a different vaccine shows the power of Facebook posts in fueling "anti-vax" resistance to immunization.

    The study included more than 10 years of public Facebook posts on the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine. It found that nearly 40% of 6,500 HPV vaccine-related posts from 2006 to 2016 amplified a perceived risk. The data suggest the...

    HPV Vaccine Proves Its Mettle Against Cervical Cancer

    Girls who are vaccinated against human papillomavirus (HPV) may drastically cut their chances of developing cervical cancer by age 30, a huge, new study finds.

    Researchers found that of more than 1.6 million young Swedish women, those who'd gotten the HPV vaccine were about two-thirds less likely to be diagnosed with cervical cancer than their unvaccinated peers.

    Those odds ...

    HPV Vaccination Rises Among U.S. Kids, But Many Still Unprotected

    More U.S. kids are getting a recommended vaccine that protects against several cancers -- but there is still much room for improvement, a new study finds.

    At issue is the vaccine against human papillomavirus (HPV). Certain strains of HPV are sexually transmitted, and some of those are "high risk" -- meaning that if the immune system does not clear the infection, it can eventually lead...

    American Cancer Society Recommends HPV Test for Cervical Cancer Screening

    An updated guideline from the American Cancer Society calls for more simplified cervical cancer screening, administered less often.

    The new guideline calls for an initial cervix screening at age 25, followed by the human papillomavirus (HPV) test every five years, continuing through age 65, the guideline says.

    "These streamlined recommendations can improve compliance and re...

    HPV Shots: Safe and Effective, But Many Parents Still Hesitate

    More than a decade of research has shown that the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine protects against a host of cancers, yet a new study finds that only half of American teens complete the multiple-shot regimen.

    Why? Researchers discovered that many parents still harbor safety concerns about the vaccine, even though it guards against 90% of all cervical and anal cancers.

    <...

    Gay Men Underestimate Their Risks From HPV

    Young men who have sex with other men don't fully grasp their risk for human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, due to a lack of information from health care providers, researchers say.

    Interviews with men in their early 20s who are gay, bisexual or who identify as straight but have sex with men found that they knew little about HPV, including how it is transmitted, its symptoms and how ...

    One Dose of HPV Vaccine May Protect Against Cervical Cancer

    A single dose of the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine works as well as multiple doses to protect older teen girls against preinvasive cervical disease, which can develop into cervical cancer, researchers say.

    For the study, the researchers analyzed data on more than 133,000 females aged 9 to 26. Half weren't vaccinated and half received one or more HPV vaccine doses between January...

    Cervical Cancer Could All But Disappear in North America by 2040

    Vaccination and screening could nearly wipe out cervical cancer in North America in the next 20 years and rid the world of the disease within the next century, researchers say.

    In a new study, the researchers assessed the potential impacts of the World Health Organization's (WHO) draft strategy for cervical cancer elimination, which calls for 90% of girls to be vaccinated against ...

    The Damage of Vaccine Misinformation

    An examination of vaccination trends in Denmark shows just how damaging vaccine misinformation can be.

    From 2013 to 2016, negative information about the HPV (human papillomavirus) vaccine spread widely through Danish media outlets. As a result, thousands of girls did not receive the vaccine.

    For the study, researchers from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill look...

    HPV Blamed for Rising Rates of Anal Cancer

    Anal cancer rates have surged in the past 15 years, and the sexually transmitted human papillomavirus (HPV) may be to blame, a new study suggests.

    "What was very shocking to us was that the rate and incidence of anal cancer has increased very fast," said lead researcher Ashish Deshmukh. He's an assistant professor in the department of health services research, management and policy a...

    Studies Confirm HPV Shot Is Safe

    The HPV vaccine gives parents a chance to prevent their children from developing some types of cancer, and two new studies reaffirm what past research has found -- the vaccine is safe.

    The two studies included millions of doses of Gardasil 9 vaccine, the only vaccine currently used in the United States for the prevention of HPV-related cancers.

    "The data from our study was...

    Most Americans in the Dark About Cancer-Causing HPV, Survey Finds

    Among Americans aged 18 to 26, two-thirds of men and one-third of women still do not know that the human papillomavirus (HPV) is the leading cause of cervical cancer, a new survey finds.

    The survey findings also showed that more than 70% of American adults don't know that the common sexually transmitted infection can cause anal, penile and oral cancers.

    The findings come...

    CDC Recommends Catch-Up HPV Vaccination for Young Adults

    Young adults up through the age of 26 should now get the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, U.S. health officials recommended Thursday.

    Until now, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention had said this age group could get the vaccine, which prevents several cancers caused by HPV, but it is now saying this group should get the vaccine as a catch-up. The vaccine had a...

    HPV Vaccine Making Headway Against Cancer-Causing Virus Worldwide

    HPV vaccination programs significantly reduce human papillomavirus infections and precancerous cervical lesions, a new global review finds.

    Vaccination protects against the HPV strains that cause the majority of cervical cancers.

    Researchers analyzed 65 studies that included data collected over eight years from more than 60 million people in 14 high-income countries.

    ...

    Not All Cervical Cancer Rates Are Declining

    A type of cervical cancer that's less sensitive to Pap testing is increasing among white women in the United States, new research shows.

    An overall decline in cervical cancer rates in recent decades has been driven by decreases in squamous cell carcinomas. Most of the rest of cervical cancer cases are adenocarcinomas, which are less likely to be detected by Pap testing and are mainly ...

    HPV Vaccine Driving Down Cervical Pre-Cancer Rates

    The human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine is largely responsible for a decline in precancerous cervical lesions among young women in the United States, a new government report shows.

    The number of these precancerous lesions detected during screening went down from an estimated 216,000 cases in 2008 to 196,000 cases in 2016, researchers from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Preven...

    Why the HPV Vaccine Is More Important Than Ever

    HPV, the human papillomavirus, is the most common sexually transmitted infection in the United States, with 14 million new cases each year.

    While most people are able to clear the virus on their own, certain strains of HPV lead to cancer years after exposure. In fact, HPV-related cancers affect more than 30,000 Americans every year.

    The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and...

    Some Boys Are Having Sex Before 13

    Talking to your children about sex can be awkward, but new research suggests that parents need to have those conversations much earlier than they do.

    In two national surveys, investigators found that between 4% and 8% of boys reported having sex before they were 13. That number varied greatly depending on where the boys lived. In San Francisco, just 5% of boys said they h...

    More Evidence HPV Vaccine Cuts Cervical Cancer Rate

    Scotland is already seeing a payoff for vaccinating adolescent girls for human papillomavirus (HPV).

    Since the vaccine became routine about a decade ago, cervical cancer cases in young Scottish women have plummeted, a new study reports.

    HPV is one of the most common sexually transmitted infections. Vaccination protects against HPV types 16 and 18, which cause 70% of cer...

    How HIV Might Influence HPV Vaccination Rates

    Does being at high risk for HIV mean you're less likely to get the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine?

    New research suggests that's so.

    HIV is the virus that causes AIDS, while HPV can cause cervical, anal and other cancers.

    HPV infection is common, and healthy people often clear it from the body without developing cancer. But HIV infection weakens the immune syste...

    Cervical 'Microbiome' Could Help Predict Cancer Risk

    The community of bacteria or "microbiome" in a woman's cervix might be a harbinger of her risk for cervical cancer, a new study suggests.

    For the study, researchers used genetic analysis to identify bacteria present in samples from 144 Tanzanian women who had cervical cancer screenings between March 2015 and February 2016.

    Of the women in the study, 126 had tested positive f...

    Most Nations May Be Rid of Cervical Cancer By 2100

    Rapid expansion of HPV vaccination and cervical cancer screening could eliminate the cancer as a major health problem in many countries by the end of the century, a new study claims.

    HPV (human papillomavirus) causes most cases of cervical cancer, and the researchers determined that more than 13 million cases of cervical cancer worldwide could be prevented in the coming decades.

    ...

    HPV Infections Most Tied to Cancer Are in Decline, and Vaccines May Be Why

    Infections with two strains of the sexually transmitted human papillomavirus (HPV) are showing marked declines among American women, and rising vaccination rates could be driving the trend.

    That's the finding from a new study involving thousands of U.S. women who tested positive for precancerous conditions of the cervix.

    Infection with HPV is by far the leading cause of cerv...

    Hands Don't Spread HPV, Study Finds

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is easily transmitted during sex, but it is unlikely to be passed by the hands, Canadian researchers report.

    The virus, which infects the skin and genitals, is a cause of several types of cancer in both men and women, including cervical cancer, as well as tumors of the vagina, penis, anus and throat.

    Because HPV strains on your hand usually match t...

    HPV Might Be Behind Vocal Cord Cancers in Young

    Recent increases in vocal cord cancers among younger, nonsmoking Americans may be explained by the spread of human papilloma virus (HPV), researchers report.

    "Over the past 150 years, vocal cord, or glottic cancer, has been almost exclusively a disease associated with smoking and almost entirely seen in patients over 40 years old," explained study senior author Dr. Steven Zeitels. He ...

    Study Ties Cancer-Causing HPV to Heart Disease, Too

    Certain strains of HPV are known to cause cervical cancer and other types of tumors. Now, a new study raises the possibility that they might also contribute to heart disease.

    Researchers found that among over 63,000 women, those infected with "high-risk" strains of human papillomavirus (HPV) were somewhat more likely to develop heart disease or suffer a stroke over the next several ye...

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