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Lifting of Federal Ban on Gun Research Funding Has Spurred More Studies

U.S. research into gun violence has started to expand following the ending of a two-decade drought of federal funding for such studies, a new report finds.

Firearms violence studies had been stymied by severe restrictions on federal funding adopted by Congress in 1996, the researchers said.

But those restrictions began to loosen in the mid-2010s, and in 2020 Congress began appropria...

As Blizzards Bear Down, Stay Safe From Carbon Monoxide Dangers

With blizzards and possible power outages threatening much of America this week, some dangers might not be immediately obvious: carbon monoxide poisoning, fires and electric shock.

“I urge consumers to follow CPSC's safety tips to prepare ahead of storms to prevent loss of life in a storm's aftermath," said Alex Ho...

New Antibiotic Slays Deadly Superbug in Early Trial

Researchers report that a new type of antibiotic has proved its mettle against a deadly superbug.

Acinetobacter baumannii, a bacteria goes by the nickname CRAB, can trigger serious infections in the lungs, urinary tract and blood, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Unfortunately, it's resistant to a class of powerful broad-spectrum antibiotics calle...

Your New Year's Eve Safety Checklist

Millions of revelers hit the road after New Year's Eve celebrations and the inevitability of impaired drivers make the holiday one of the nation's deadliest.

High blood-alcohol levels are a factor in more than 50% of crashes on New Year's Day, the American Safety Council warns. Law enforcement officers will be on alert, with checkpoints and roadblocks in many places to check drivers for s...

Small Magnetic Balls Sold at Walmart Recalled Over Swallowing Dangers

Tiny, powerful magnetic balls sold exclusively online at Walmart as building blocks and stress relievers have been recalled for swallowing dangers, the U.S. Consumer Products Safety Commission (CPSC) said Thursday.

In announcing the recall, the commission pointed to thousands of hospitalizations and at least seven deaths linked to similar products.

Swallowing magnets is dangerous be...

FDA Warns of Counterfeit Ozempic

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has uncovered counterfeit Ozempic shots in the legitimate U.S. drug supply chain, and is warning patients to be on their guard.

The FDA said Thursday that it has seized thousands of counterfeit dos...

WHO Declares JN.1 a COVID Variant of Interest as It Spreads Widely

The new COVID variant known as JN.1 was named a "variant of interest" by the World Health Organization on Tuesday, which means health officials are now closely tracking its rapid spread across the globe.

So far, the highly mutated variant has not been shown to trigger more severe illness than previous incarnations of the coronavirus. Still, it is spreading faster than its ancestor, the BA...

Too Few Americans Are Getting Vaccinated for Flu, COVID & RSV, CDC Warns

Low vaccination rates for the flu, RSV and COVID-19 are putting Americans at higher risk for severe illness and hospitalization this winter, a new government alert warned Thursday.

There is an “urgent need” to boost vaccination rates as the trio of viruses spread through the country, the U.S. Centers of Disease Control and Prevention said.

“Low vaccination rates, coupled with ...

Salmonella Illnesses Tied to Cantaloupes Have Doubled: CDC

FRIDAY, Dec. 8, 2023 (Healthday News) -- A salmonella outbreak tied to tainted cantaloupes keeps expanding, with cases doubling since the last tally, U.S. health officials reported Thursday.

"Since the last update [on] November 30, 2023, an additional 113 people infected with this outbreak strain of salmonella have been reported from four additional states, resulting in a total case coun...

E-Scooter on Your Kids' Holiday Gift List? Experts Have Warnings, Safety Tips

An electric scooter might be on your kid's wish list for Christmas, but pediatricians say parents should think twice before buying one.

Even taking a child on a ride with an e-scooter is a dicey proposition, said Dr. Ashley Ebersole, a pediatrician with Nationwide Children's Hospital in Ohio.

...

It's Hunting Season: Keep Safety in Your Sights

TUESDAY, Dec. 5, 2023 (Healthday News) -- Hunting season has begun in many parts of the United States, with millions of Americans heading into the woods in hopes of bagging a big buck.

But with the season comes tragic accidents.

“Every year, within the first 72 hours of hunting season, we see hunting-related injuries,” said

  • Robin Foster HealthDay Reporter
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  • December 5, 2023
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  • Respiratory Illnesses in China Not Caused by New Virus, CDC Director Testifies

    FRIDAY, Dec. 1, 2023 (Healthday News) -- In testimony provided Thursday to members of Congress, the head of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said that a surge in respiratory illnesses in China is not being fueled by a new virus.

    Instead, the spike can be linked to existing viruses and bacteria, including COVID-19, the flu, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and Mycop...

    Most Men Taking Bodybuilding Supplements Don't Know They Can Harm Fertility

    Bodybuilders are largely unaware that the protein supplements they use to bulk up might harm their fertility, a new study shows.

    Four out of five male gym enthusiasts (79%) said they use protein supplements as part of their fitness plan, the poll found.

    But only 14% had considered how those supplements -- which contain high levels of the female hormone estrogen -- might impact their...

    CDC Advisors Recommend Masks in Hospitals Without Naming Type

    Advisors to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have voted to recommend that health providers wear masks during routine care for patients who are thought to be contagious.

    Still, health care workers were frustrated that the draft recommendation does not specify what kind of mask should be worn -- loose-fitting surgical masks or fitted, tightly woven N95 masks.

    The C...

    New Antibiotic Tackles Drug-Resistant Gonorrhea in Trial

    The first new antibiotic for gonorrhea -- the second most common sexually transmitted disease -- has shown promise in a clinical trial.

    That news should come as a relief to public health experts, because gonorrhea has become resistant to all but one of the existing antibiotics used to treat it.

    This new antibiotic, called zoliflodacin, was seen in the

  • Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • November 3, 2023
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  • Earthquakes Are Unpredictable: Plan Ahead to Lower the Danger

    When an earthquake struck the center of Morocco earlier this month, killing nearly 3,000 and injuring thousands more, no one was expecting it.

    That sudden rapid shaking of ground as the rocks underneath the earth shift can happen anywhere, but higher-risk areas in the United States include Alaska, California, Hawaii, Oregon, Puerto Rico, Washington and the entire Mississippi River Valley....

    Anxious Driver? There Are Ways to Ease Your Stress

    It's not unusual to experience driving anxiety. Living in cities with heavy traffic, five-lane highways and little public transportation can make it even harder.

    A psychologist offers some suggestions for easing those fears.

    “One of the biggest challenges centers around anxiety related to the trigger, and that can be exacerbated by a variety of things like weather, traffic or con...

    When Cities Get a Pro Sports Team, Flu Deaths Rise

    Bringing a professional sports team to a new city often includes a big taxpayer-funded stadium subsidy, but new research shows that has a health downside: a spike in flu deaths.

    “Most, if not all, of the sports venues in the cities we studied received direct and/or indirect public financing,” said researcher Brad Humph...

    Half of America's Beaches Have Unsafe Pollution Levels: Report

    A day at the beach can be fun with family and friends, but water pollution can ruin the experience.

    The problem is more widespread than many might think: In a new report, the Environment America Research & Policy Center, a nonprofit organization, found that half of U.S. beaches had potentially unsafe contamination levels in 2022.

    Among nearly 3,200 beaches nationwide that were teste...

    You've Suffered Whiplash: Know the Symptoms & Treatments

    Whiplash — an often underestimated injury that can strike in the aftermath of a collision — inflicts injury and pain on its unsuspecting victims.

    If you find yourself grappling with the relentless effects of whiplash, you're not alone. Numerous legal websites estimate that at least 3 million Americans per year sustain whiplash injuries.

    Here's what you should know about a whipla...

    Illicit Use of Ketamine Keeps Rising in U.S.

    Seizures of illicit ketamine by drug enforcement agents have surged throughout the United States, growing 349% from 2017 through 2022, a new study finds.

    Rising use of ketamine could increase the likelihood that people who use the drug recreationally may instead get a potentially harmful version of the substance, researchers say.

    “This dramatic rise in ketamine seizures by l...

    Hurricane Season Starts June 1. Protect Your Family From Carbon Monoxide Dangers

    The Atlantic hurricane season in the United States starts June 1, and some dangers might not be immediately obvious: carbon monoxide poisoning, fires and electric shock.

    “Hurricanes and major storms in the U.S. have increased in frequency and severity in recent years. This hurricane season may bring widespread destruction that could impact millions of Americans,” said

  • Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • May 22, 2023
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  • Biden Nominates Head of National Cancer Institute to Run NIH

    The U.S. National Institutes of Health could get a new leader in Dr. Monica Bertagnolli, the Boston cancer surgeon who's led the U.S. National Cancer Institute (NCI) since last fall.

    On Monday President Joe Biden formally nominated Bertagnolli to the post, which has be...

    You're More Likely to Die From Guns in a Small Town Than Big City

    Gun deaths in the United States are more likely in small towns than big cities, and suicides are a big reason why.

    Gun suicides are more common than gun homicides, according to a new study. Those suicides have played a large part in the increase in gun deaths over the past few decades.

    “Our study has found that the divide in total intentional firearm deaths between urban and rural...

    USDA Cracks Down on Salmonella in Breaded Stuffed Raw Chicken Products

    The U.S. Department of Agriculture plans to get tougher on Salmonella bacteria found in breaded, stuffed raw chicken products, the agency announced Tuesday.

    About 1.35 million people are infected with Salmonella bacteria each year in the United States, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

    Almost a quarter of the nation's Salmonella infections are caused by ...

    Biden to Nominate Head of National Cancer Institute to Run NIH

    The U.S. National Institutes of Health could get a new leader in Dr. Monica Bertagnolli, the Boston cancer surgeon who has led the U.S. National Cancer Institute (NCI) since last fall.

    The White House plans to nominate Bertagnolli to the post,...

    Report Finds Big Rise in U.S. Carbon Monoxide Deaths

    A new report from the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) reveals deaths from carbon monoxide poisoning are increasing in the United States.

    The report looked at carbon monoxide (CO) deaths from 2009 to 2019, finding 250 consumer product-related CO deaths in 2019, more than any other year.

    Generators and other engine-driven tools accounted for the largest percentage ...

    Big Changes Are Coming to U.S. Health Care as Pandemic Emergencies Expire

    Americans received unprecedented access to health care during the pandemic, including hassle-free public insurance and free tests, treatments and vaccines for COVID-19.

    Now, they need to prepare for most of that to unwind, experts say.

    “Essentially, Congress and the administration moved to a model of universal health coverage for COVID vaccines, treatments and tests” during the ...

    After Baby Formula Scandal, FDA Announces New Unit Focused on Food Safety

    Stung by recent food safety scandals -- most notably last year's infant formula shortage, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced Tuesday that it is creating a new unit devoted to food safety.

    The newly dubbed Human Foods Program will wield wide-ranging powers.

    "We're proposing the creation of a unified, newly envisioned organization, called the Human Foods Program, that el...

    It's Snow Season: Stay Safe on the Slopes

    Skiiers and snowboarders, take note: You're less likely to get hurt if you ease back into the winter sports season.

    “We see a lot of patients in the After-Hours Clinic (of the department of orthopaedic surgery) on their way back from skiing and snowboarding,” said Dr. Sabrina Sawl...

    Feds Urge Vaccination as 'Tripledemic' Hits More Americans

    Flu, RSV and COVID-19 are creating a perfect storm of respiratory disease that is overwhelming the nation's health care systems.

    Vaccination will be key to getting through the winter holidays with your health intact, U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Director Dr. Rochelle Walensky said during a m...

    Frozen Stuffed Chicken Products & Microwave Ovens: A Recipe for Salmonella

    After repeat U.S. outbreaks of salmonella tied to frozen, breaded and stuffed chicken products, researchers are now pointing to microwave cooking as a key driver of illness.

    Because they're breaded, the popular products — for example, chicken stuffed with broccoli and cheese, chicken cordon bleu, or chicken Kiev — can look cooked. But under that breading the meat is raw, noted researc...

    Monkeypox Renamed MPox Amid Racism Concerns

    Monkeypox still exists, but its name is being phased out over racism concerns.

    For the next year, the terms monkeypox and the new name mpox will be used interchangeably before the virus is permanently renamed mpox, the World Health Organization

  • Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • November 28, 2022
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  • Most Americans Admit to Driving While Drowsy: Poll

    Most people consider drowsy driving dangerous, but an estimated 37 million Americans still get behind the wheel at least once a year when they're so tired they can barely keep their eyes open.

    About six in 10 people admitted to drowsy driving in a new survey by the National Sleep Foundation (NSF).

    “Drowsy driving is impaired driving,” said Joseph Dzierzewski, the foundation's vi...

    Along Eastern Seaboard, Hurricanes Getting Bigger, Wetter

    The Atlantic seaboard could be in for faster-forming and wetter hurricanes, new research warns.

    Climate change is the overarching cause, experts say.

    As parts of the United States, Canada and Puerto Rico recover from powerful hurricanes

  • Cara Murez
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  • October 18, 2022
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  • 4.4 Million Americans Have Gotten Updated COVID Boosters

    At least 4.4 million Americans have received the updated COVID-19 booster shot.

    The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention posted the count Thursday as public health experts decried President Joe Biden's televised claim that "the pandemic is over."

    The White Hous...

    Do Taxes on Soda Really Lower Sugar Intake?

    New research suggests that good intentions may not always be enough when it comes to public health.

    According to the study of the consequences of Philadelphia's 2017 tax on sugar-sweete...

    Deadly 'Rainbow Fentanyl' Looks Like Candy, Could Entice Kids

    The U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) is warning the public that colorfully dyed fentanyl — dubbed "rainbow fentanyl" — is readily available across the United States.

    “Rainbow fentanyl — fentanyl pills and powder that come in a variety of bright colors, shapes, and sizes — is a deliberat...

    How Worried Should You Be About New Reports on Polio?

    Poliovirus detected in New York City wastewater last week put public health officials on high alert, as it indicates the potentially paralyzing virus is circulating widely in the area.

    But infectious disease experts say there's no need for families of fully vaccinated children to panic.

    "The inactivated p...

    TPOXX Is the Only Monkeypox Treatment -- If You Can Get It

    What if a rare viral illness with the potential to cause excruciating pain was in fact treatable, but the only drug for that use was nearly impossible to get, despite being in plentiful supply?

    That is precisely the dilemma now confronting thousands of monkeypox patients across the United States.

    "I was ...

    Safer Roadways Could Save 540,000 Lives a Year Worldwide

    Traffic accidents kill about 1.35 million people around the world each year.

    As the United Nations convenes a meeting on global road safety, new research suggests that if nations focused on key safety measures, about 540,000 lives a year could be saved.

    "The death toll from traffic injuries around the world is far too high," said study author Dr. Adnan Hyder, a professor at the Milk...

    Many Parents Ignore Fireworks Safety

    Many U.S. parents don't take proper precautions to protect their children from fireworks-related burns and injuries, claims a new survey released just ahead of the Fourth of July.

    The poll of more than 2,000 parents of children ages 3-18 was conducted this spring and found that more than half sa...

    Kids Can Suffer Severe Injuries at Trampoline Parks

    Bouncing on a trampoline is always risky, but kids are more likely to suffer serious injuries at a trampoline center than at home, according to researchers who are calling for mandatory safety standards at the centers.

    U.S. emergency departments treat nearly 100,000 children a year for

  • By Robert Preidt HealthDay Reporter
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  • June 14, 2022
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  • Feds Warn of Bedrails That Can Entrap; 3 Deaths Reported

    At least three elderly Americans suffocated after getting trapped in Mobility Transfer Systems adult portable bedrails, and the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) says anyone who has the rails should stop using them immediately.

    The

  • By Robert Preidt HealthDay Reporter
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  • June 3, 2022
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  • 1 Dirty Pool, Many Cases of E. Coli: Summer's Swimming Danger

    As the weather warms and families flock to pools, dirty water may dampen the fun.

    Swimmers at a Pennsylvania community pool learned that the hard way when in June 2021 more than a dozen kids were seriously sickened by two types of bacteria, E. coli and

  • Steven Reinberg HealthDay Reporter
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  • May 23, 2022
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  • Mystery of Hepatitis Cases in Kids Deepens as CDC Probe Continues

    Evidence continues to mount that a specific strain of adenovirus could be implicated in a wave of American children who've developed acute hepatitis of unknown origin, U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention officials said Friday.

    "The evidence is accumulating that there's a role for adenovirus, particularly adenovirus 41," Dr. Jay Butler, the CDC's deputy director for infectious ...

    U.S. Pedestrians Dying at Highest Rate in 40 Years

    U.S. pedestrian deaths in 2021 were the highest in four decades, with an average of 20 deaths every day, according to the Governors Highway Safety Association.

    An estimated 7,485 pedestrians were killed in 2021, which was 12% more than in 2020, preliminary data show.

    The findings are "heartbreaking and unacceptable," said Jonathan Adkins, executive director of the highway safety ass...

    COVID Rules Don't Apply: Narcissists Shun Masks, Vaccines

    Narcissists' belief that it's 'all about them' can make them less likely to wear a mask or get vaccinated during the pandemic, a new study shows.

    Researchers analyzed data gathered from 1,100 U.S. adults in March 2021. They were asked about their mask use and vaccination views and behaviors, and they also completed assessments to measure their levels of

  • By Robert Preidt HealthDay Reporter
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  • May 16, 2022
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  • Experts Weigh in on CDC's New Forecasting Center for Infectious Diseases

    Back in December, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention held a detailed briefing to warn public health officials about an emerging COVID variant dubbed Omicron.

    Officials were incredibly specific, said Lori Tremmel Freeman, CEO of the National Association of County and City Health Officials, predicting that Omicron would enter the United States in four weeks and grow in inte...

    Winter Storms Bring Carbon Monoxide Danger to Homes

    With winter storms roaring through much of the United States this week, millions of Americans may face power outages that could put them at risk of carbon monoxide poisoning and fires as they try to keep warm, the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission warns.

    When the power goes out, many people use portable generators or other devices for heat and power, but improper use of such equipme...