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Salsa Is Smart: Latin Dance May Boost Your Aging Brain

Latin dance classes may be a great workout and social outlet, but new research suggests that learning the intricate steps of the salsa, samba and merengue may also improve your memory.

In the study, a Latin dance program was offered to more than 300 Spanish speakers over four years at 12 different sites in Chic...

Women Can Dance Themselves to Better Health After Menopause

Better health and self-image might just be a samba or some funky moves away.

That's true for postmenopausal women who, a new study says, can dance their way to better physical and emotional health.

"In addition to the positive effects on physical, metabolic and mental health aspects, dance promotes a moment of leisure, fun, socialization, self-knowledge and many other b...

Shall You Dance? Study Finds Dancing Helps Seniors Avoid Falls

Preventing falls in older age could be as fun as dancing them away, new research shows.

Researchers found a 31% reduction in falls and a 37% reduction in fall risk for those aged 65 and older when reviewing clinical trials on "dance-based mind-motor activities" from around the world.

"We were positively surprised by the consistency of our results," said study author ...

Dance Injuries Jump in United States

Dance-related injuries treated at U.S. emergency departments increased by nearly one-quarter in recent years, a new study reveals.

Between 2014 and 2018, there was a 22.5% rise in such injuries, with more than 4,150 cases seen in ERs nationwide during that time.

Strains and sprains accounted for almost half of the injuries, according to the National Athletic Trainers' As...

Ask Grandma to Dance to Boost Her Mood And Strengthen Your Bonds

If you're a grandparent, shaking a leg with your grandchild might benefit both of you.

That's the upshot of a new study from Israel, where researchers examined how dancing together affected 16 grandmas and granddaughters. The takeaway: It can encourage exercise and deepen ties between the two generations.

Dancing "promoted physical activity even when the body was fatigued an...

Even a Little Activity Keeps Aging Brains From Shrinking, Study Shows

Take a walk, weed your garden, go for a swim or dance -- it could keep your brain from shrinking as you age, a new study suggests.

Being physically active may keep your brain four years younger than the rest of you, which might help prevent or slow the progression of dementias like Alzheimer's disease, researchers say.

"We recently published a paper using information of bo...

Variety is Key for the Fittest Americans

Very fit American adults enjoy a wider range of physical activities than those who are less active, a new study finds.

The findings could help point to ways to boost physical activity in adults, according to the researchers.

Data gathered from more than 9,800 adults nationwide between 2003 and 2006 showed that those who were active had done at least two different activities...

'Hot' Yoga, Hula Dance Your Way to Healthy Blood Pressure

Moderate exercise is known to improve blood pressure -- and that may include activities that are more exotic than a brisk walk, two preliminary studies suggest.

In one, researchers found that "hot" yoga classes lowered blood pressure in a small group of people with modestly elevated numbers. In the other, hula dancing showed the same benefit for people who had stubbornly high blood pr...

Dance Your Way to Better Health

Two very different studies show that dancing is more than just fun. It can keep your mind sharp and your heart healthy.

The first was done in the United Kingdom and published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

Researchers pooled results from 11 surveys that included a total of 49,000 people. The investigators compared the health effects of walking and da...

TV Watching May Be Most Unhealthy Type of Sitting: Study

Next time you're ready to hit the sofa for an evening of TV, think twice -- it just might kill you.

Though too much sitting has long been linked to health risks, a new study suggests all sitting isn't the same -- and sitting in front of the TV after dinner for long hours at a stretch is especially unhealthy.

In fact, those who did just that increased their risk for heart at...