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20 Oct

Teenagers Are Quitting HS Sports Due to Body Image Concerns Driven by Social Media

More teens are quitting HS sports saying they don’t look right for the sports based on what they see in the media and social media, according to a new study.

19 Oct

COVID-19 Linked to Increased Risk of Guillain-Barré Syndrome, a Rare but Serious Autoimmune Disorder, New Study Finds

In a new study, participants recently infected with COVID-19 were six times more likely to develop Guillain-Barré syndrome, where the immune system attacks the nerves.

18 Oct

Adult ADHD Linked to Increased Risk of Dementia

A new study finds adults with ADHD are nearly 3 times more likely to develop dementia compared to those without the condition.

Move to Electric Vehicles Could Prevent Millions of Child Asthma Attacks Each Year

Move to Electric Vehicles Could Prevent Millions of Child Asthma Attacks Each Year

If all cars and trucks sold in America were "zero emission" by 2040 and the country's electric grid was also powered by clean energy, nearly 2.8 million child asthma attacks would be prevented annually, a new report finds.

The American Lung Association (ALA) report also estimates that with cleaner air, 508 infant lives would also be save...

  • Ernie Mundell HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 21, 2024
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This Election Year, Health Care Costs Top Voter Concerns: Poll

This Election Year, Health Care Costs Top Voter Concerns: Poll

Unexpected medical bills and high health care costs are dominating an election where kitchen table economic problems weigh heavily on voter's minds, a new KFF poll has found.

Voters struggling to pay their monthly bills are most eager to hear presidential candidates talk about economic and health care issues, according to the latest KFF He...

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 21, 2024
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WHO Reports 79% Increase in Measles Cases Worldwide

WHO Reports 79% Increase in Measles Cases Worldwide

Measles cases around the globe have climbed 79%, with over 300,000 cases reported last year, World Health Organization officials said Tuesday.

The U.N. health agency said it did not yet have a tally for measles deaths in 2023, but it expects that number will also rise.

"In 2022, the number of deaths increased by 43%, according to our...

  • Robin Foster HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 21, 2024
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Alabama Supreme Court Rules Frozen Embryos Are Children

Alabama Supreme Court Rules Frozen Embryos Are Children

In a ruling that could drastically limit future infertility care, the Alabama Supreme Court has ruled that frozen embryos can be considered children under state law.

In the decision, judges turned to what it called anti-abortion language in that state's constitution and concluded that an 1872 state law that allows parents to sue over the d...

  • Robin Foster HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 21, 2024
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Mercury Levels in Tuna Haven't Budged Since 1971

Mercury Levels in Tuna Haven't Budged Since 1971

Mercury levels in tuna haven't changed since 1971, despite efforts to reduce emissions of the toxic metal into the environment, researchers report.

Their analysis of nearly 3,000 tuna samples caught in the Pacific, Atlantic and Indian Oceans between 1971 and 2022 revealed stable mercury concentrations in tuna during those five decades.

...

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 21, 2024
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Menthols Ban Would Slash U.S. Smoking Rates: Study

Menthols Ban Would Slash U.S. Smoking Rates: Study

A ban on menthol cigarettes would likely lead to a meaningful reduction in smoking rates, a new review argues.

Almost a quarter of menthol smokers quit smoking altogether after menthol cigarettes were banned in their country or community, researchers report Feb. 21 in the journal Nicotine & Tobacco Research.

“This revi...

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 21, 2024
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Cutting Out Meat Might Help Prevent Snoring: Study

Cutting Out Meat Might Help Prevent Snoring: Study

A person’s diet can influence their risk of obstructive sleep apnea, a new study says.

Those who eat a healthy plant-based diet rich in vegetables, fruit, whole grains and nuts are less likely to suffer sleep apnea, according to findings published Feb. 20 in the journal ERJ Open Research.

On the other hand, people who eat ...

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 21, 2024
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Parents Scrambling After Asthma Inhaler Flovent Removed From Market

Parents Scrambling After Asthma Inhaler Flovent Removed From Market

A popular asthma inhaler was discontinued on Jan. 1, and the business move has left families scrambling to find a replacement for their kids.

Flovent was one of the most commonly prescribed drugs for childhood asthma, but maker GSK took it off shelves to replace it with a generic version, fluticasone.

The problem is that many insuran...

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 21, 2024
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Remains Show Prehistoric Peoples Cared for Those With Down Syndrome

Remains Show Prehistoric Peoples Cared for Those With Down Syndrome

Rare gene-driven defects such as Down syndrome have occurred among human beings for many thousands of years, a new analysis of ancient DNA has revealed.

Not only did the birth defects exist, but these infants were often buried with care by their community. That suggests they were included as part of the community despite their differences,...

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 21, 2024
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Out-of-Pocket Costs Are Tough on Americans With Diabetes

Out-of-Pocket Costs Are Tough on Americans With Diabetes

People with diabetes have to spend a ton of money to stay healthy, a new study reports.

Total and out-of-pocket costs for diabetics run hundreds to thousands of dollars more than regular medical expenses for people without diabetes, researchers found.

Type 1 diabetes costs nearly $25,700 a year to properly manage, with out-of-pocket ...

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 21, 2024
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Healthy Living Can Prevent Irritable Bowel Syndrome

Healthy Living Can Prevent Irritable Bowel Syndrome

Folks who follow a healthy lifestyle are less likely to wind up with a case of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), a new study claims.

The more healthy behaviors in which a person regularly engaged, the lower their risk of IBS, researchers reported Feb. 20 in the journal Gut.

Not smoking, vigorous exercise and getting enough sle...

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 21, 2024
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Treating Vaginal Dryness Around and After Menopause

Treating Vaginal Dryness Around and After Menopause

Postmenopausal or peri-menopausal women are often hampered by vaginal dryness, which can put the brakes on a healthy sex life.

It doesn't have to stay that way, experts advised. Numerous products are available to help maintain vaginal lubrication.

"After and around the time of menopause, your body makes less estrogen," Dr. Cynthia Ab...

  • Ernie Mundell HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 21, 2024
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Which Surgery for Stress Urinary Incontinence Is Best for You?

Which Surgery for Stress Urinary Incontinence Is Best for You?

If you're female and you lose bladder control upon exertion -- sneezing, coughing, laughing, lifting something heavy -- you may have stress urinary incontinence.

As many women know, the condition is no joke and it may keep you from doing the things you love.

There are solutions, however, some of them surgical. Here, experts at the M...

  • Ernie Mundell HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 21, 2024
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Annual Mammograms Starting at 40 Saves The Most Lives

Annual Mammograms Starting at 40 Saves The Most Lives

Researchers hope a new study will end the debate over the best age to start breast cancer screening and how often to do it.

"The biggest takeaway point of our study is that annual screening beginning at 40 and continuing to at least age 79 gives … the most cancer deaths averted, and the most years of life gained," said lead researcher Dr...

  • Carole Tanzer Miller HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 20, 2024
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EPA Will Spend $5.8 Billion to Help Clean Up U.S. Drinking Water

EPA Will Spend $5.8 Billion to Help Clean Up U.S. Drinking Water

Nearly $6 billion in funding will soon be spread through every U.S. state and territory as part of a massive, ongoing effort to clean up the nation's water supply, the Biden Administration announced Tuesday.

EPA Adminstrator Michael Regan and Vice President Kamala Harris will travel to Pittsburgh on Tuesday to announce the latest infusion ...

  • Robin Foster HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 20, 2024
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It's Tougher for Non-White Americans to Get Opioid Addiction Drug

It's Tougher for Non-White Americans to Get Opioid Addiction Drug

Americans addicted to opioids who need the anti-addiction med buprenorphine are far more likely to find it if they live in a predominantly white neighborhood, new research finds.

“Access is substantially better in areas that are very white," said study lead author Coleman Drake, an assistant professor of health policy and management at P...

  • Ernie Mundell HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 20, 2024
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Too Much Niacin May Be Bad for the Heart

Too Much Niacin May Be Bad for the Heart

Niacin is an essential B vitamin, but new research reveals that too much of it may harm your heart.

Found in many foods that millions of Americans eat, excessive amounts of niacin can trigger inflammation and damage blood vessels, scientists report in the Feb. 19 issue of the journal Nature Medicine.

"The average person sho...

  • Robin Foster HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 20, 2024
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Preventive Mastectomies May Save Lives of Women With Breast Cancer Genes

Preventive Mastectomies May Save Lives of Women With Breast Cancer Genes

Women who carry certain mutations in their BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes know they are at heightened odds for breast cancer.

Now, Canadian research suggests that for some patients a "risk-reducing" preventive mastectomy may cut the odds of dying from breast cancer later.

“The decision to have a risk-reducing mastectomy is often difficult fo...

  • Ernie Mundell HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 20, 2024
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Anger Won't Help You Get Ahead in the Workplace

Anger Won't Help You Get Ahead in the Workplace

Being an angry hard-charger won't win you any points in the workplace, new research has found.

Prior evidence had suggested that workers who express anger are judged to be competent and hold a higher status, the researchers noted.

But the new studies refute those earlier findings, according to researchers from Hebrew University of Je...

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 20, 2024
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Gene-Based Tests Could Predict Your Odds for Common Illnesses

Gene-Based Tests Could Predict Your Odds for Common Illnesses

Accurate genetic tests for 10 common diseases are nearly ready for everyday use in doctor's offices, a new study says.

Gene scans for 10 common illnesses have been honed to the point that they now are being road-tested in clinical research, according to a team at the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard.

The tests evaluate a person's s...

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 20, 2024
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