Get Healthy!

Results for search "Tobacco: Cigarette Smoking".

17 Mar

Taxing Cigarettes Reduces Infant Death Rate, Study Finds

Raising cigarette taxes may lead to significant reductions in infant mortality, according to a new study.

Health News Results - 186

Smoking Weed Could Be Tougher on Your Lungs Than Cigarettes: Study

TUESDAY, Nov. 15, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- While marijuana legalization in some U.S. states and Canada may send a message that weed is harmless, that's not necessarily so, according to a new study that found lung damage was more common in marijuana smokers than tobacco users.

Research into marijuana's impact on the lungs is just getting started, because weed wasn't lega...

California Voters Ban Flavored Tobacco, and a Cigarette Maker Is Suing

Only one day after California voters approved allowing a state law banning flavored tobacco products to take effect, a tobacco giant has sued to prevent it.

R.J. Reynolds on Wednesday filed a federal lawsuit challenging Propositio...

Over 3 Million U.S. School Kids Now Vaping or Smoking

Despite continued efforts by health advocates and U.S. public health officials, a huge number of middle and high school students are still using addictive tobacco products, most often vaping products.

A new study released by two federal agencies on Thursday estimated a total of 3.08 million ...

Low-Nicotine Cigarettes Won't Leave Smokers Agitated, Study Finds

FRIDAY, Nov. 4, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has proposed limiting the amount of nicotine in cigarettes to minimally addictive levels, but there's been concern that the drop in nicotine could exacerbate anxieties in smokers who might already battle mood issues.

However, a

  • Steven Reinberg HealthDay Reporter
  • |
  • November 4, 2022
  • |
  • Full Page
  • Pregnancy May Have Women Cutting Back on Smoking Before They Know They've Conceived

    Pregnancy can be a big motivator for women to stop smoking. Now a new study suggests that at least some pregnant smokers start cutting back even before they know they've conceived.

    The findings, researchers say, suggest there may be biological mechanisms during pregnancy that can bl...

    Menthols Make Up 40% of U.S. Cigarette Sales; Ban Could Have Huge Impact

    A proposed ban on menthol cigarettes could have a significant impact on smoking rates, especially among minorities, new U.S. research suggests.

    Adult smokers who are younger, have mental health problems and are from racial/ethnic minority groups are more likely to use menthol cigarettes than other groups, according to a study from Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health and Th...

    Under 21? Many N.J. Stores Will Still Sell You Cigarettes

    Though it is illegal nationwide to sell tobacco products to anyone under age 21, many New Jersey stores still do, an undercover study revealed.

    More than 40% of store visits by 18- to 20-year-olds in New Jersey resulted in purchase of cigarettes, cigars and other tobacco products,

  • By Sydney Murphy HealthDay Reporter
  • |
  • October 6, 2022
  • |
  • Full Page
  • Smoking Costs U.S. Economy Almost $900 Billion a Year

    Smoking isn't only costly in terms of health risks, it also cost the U.S. economy $891 billion in 2020.

    That was almost 10 times the cigarette industry's $92 billion revenue, according to the authors of a new American Cancer Society study.

    "Economic losses from cigarette smoking far outweigh any economic benefit from the tobacco industry -- wages, and salaries of those employed by t...

    Men Exposed to Cigarette Smoke in Childhood More Likely to Have Asthmatic Kids

    Smoking around your child is unhealthy, but it could also harm your future grandchildren, a new study finds.

    Children are more likely to develop asthma if their father was exposed to secondhand smoke as a child, according to researchers from...

    Teens More Likely to Vape If Parent Smokes

    Parents who smoke should know that their kids are more likely to vape and try smoking.

    Those teens were 55% more likely to try e-cigarettes than those of nonsmoking parents and 51% more likely to have tried traditional cigar...

    Smoking Can Really Weaken the Heart

    Smoking is even worse for your heart than you might already think, new Danish research warns.

    "It is well known that smoking causes blocked arteries, leading to coronary heart disease and stroke," said researcher Dr. Eva Holt, of Herlev and Gentofte Hospital in Copenh...

    Why Coffee & Cigarette Is a Morning Ritual for Millions

    Smokers in the throes of nicotine withdrawal when they wake up in the morning may crave not just a cigarette but a cup of coffee along with it.

    Science can explain that.

    Researchers have identified two compounds in coffee that directly affect certain nicotine receptors in...

    Pot Users Less Likely to Think Cigarettes Are Unhealthy: Study

    Could cannabis end up being a gateway drug for cigarettes?

    Possibly, said researchers from Columbia University, who found that adults who use pot daily do not perceive smoking a pack a day as being as harmful as those who do not use pot do.

    "In the context of rec...

    Data Shows 2 Biggest Factors for Cancer Risk

    Smoking and older age are the two most important risk factors for cancer, a new, large study shows.

    The researchers also said doctors should look at excess body fat, family history and several other factors to help patients decide if they need additional

  • By Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
  • |
  • August 8, 2022
  • |
  • Full Page
  • Fewer Smokers Tried to Quit During COVID Pandemic

    Fewer people tried to quit smoking as the COVID-19 pandemic began, and this continued for at least a year, according to a new U.S. study.

    The American Cancer Society detailed pandemic smoking behavior in the report, while stressing the need to re-engage smokers in

  • By Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
  • |
  • August 8, 2022
  • |
  • Full Page
  • Myths, Ignorance Persist Around Lung Cancer: Poll

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States, but doctors have had access to a screening tool for nearly a decade that can catch it for early treatment.

    Unfortunately, neither of those facts has sunk in for many Americans, according to a new survey from the American Lung Association (ALA).

    Only 29% of Americans know that

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
  • |
  • August 1, 2022
  • |
  • Full Page
  • Many Smokers Who Want to Quit Just End Up Vaping, Too

    Many smokers eager to quit embrace electronic cigarettes as a tool for kicking the habit, but a new study warns the move may raise the risk for becoming addicted to both cigarettes and vaping.

    The finding follows a look at the experience of nearly 112,000 smokers who sought outpatie...

    Social Media Has Big Impact on People Taking Up Smoking, Vaping

    The potent influence of social media may include tobacco use.

    By analyzing 29 previously published studies, researchers found that people who viewed social media that contained tobacco content were more than twice as likely to report using tobacco and were more likely to use it in the future, compared to those who never v...

    FDA Temporarily Suspends Ban on Juul E-Cigarettes

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Tuesday temporarily suspended its ban on e-cigarettes sold by Juul Labs while the company while appeals the agency's action.

    The FDA Center for Tobacco Products wrote on Twitter that "the agency has determined that there are scienti...

    Biden to Announce Nicotine-Reduction Rule for Tobacco Companies

    A new rule that would require tobacco companies to slash nicotine levels in cigarettes could be issued Tuesday by the Biden administration.

    The rule, which would have an unprecedented effect in lowering smoking-related deaths, would be unveiled as part of a compilation of planned federal regulatory actions released twice a year, an individual with knowledge of the rule who spoke on the co...

    Another Smoking Hazard for Men: Brittle Bones

    You can add more risk of broken bones to the long list of health harms that smoking poses to men.

    Along with cancer and respiratory diseases, men who smoke have a significantly increased risk of osteoporosis,

  • By Robert Preidt HealthDay Reporter
  • |
  • June 10, 2022
  • |
  • Full Page
  • Smoking-Plus-Vaping No Healthier Than Smoking on Its Own

    Some smokers use e-cigarettes to try to kick the habit, but new research shows mixing smoking and vaping is no better for your heart health than just smoking.

    Among 24,000 men and women, smoking cigarettes and e-cigarettes didn't reduce the risk of heart attack, heart failure, stroke or any ...

    FDA Proposes Ban on Menthol Cigarettes, Flavored Cigars

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Thursday released proposed rules - first announced a year ago - to ban menthol cigarettes and flavored cigars.

    "The proposed rules would help prevent children from becoming the next generation of smokers and help adult smokers quit," U.S. Health and Human Services Secretary Xavier Becerra said in an FDA

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
  • |
  • April 28, 2022
  • |
  • Full Page
  • 'Brain Zap' Technology May Help Hardcore Smokers Quit

    Smoking is said by some to be the hardest addiction to break, and certain people might benefit from brain stimulation to quit, French researchers suggest.

    Smokers who received noninvasive brain stimulation -- using low-intensi...

    Smoking Rates Drop for Americans Battling Depression, Substance Abuse

    Folks who struggle with depression and substance use disorders often tend to be smokers, but a new study finds that smoking rates among these vulnerable Americans have fallen significantly.

    "This study shows us that at a population-level,...

    Smoking During Pregnancy May Not Raise ADHD Risk in Kids After All

    Smoking during pregnancy does not directly cause attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children, according to a new paper that challenges a widely held belief.

    "Our systematic review shows that there is no causal effect between maternal prenatal smoking and offspring ADHD diagnosis," said lead...

    Why Do Some Smokers Never Get Lung Cancer?

    Strong natural protection against cancer-causing mutations may explain why some longtime smokers don't develop lung cancer, according to a new study.

    Researchers compared mutations in cells lining the lungs from 14 never-smokers, ages 11 to 86, and 19 smokers, ages 44 to 81. The smokers had used tobacco up to 116 pack years. One pack year equals 1 pack of cigarettes smoked every day for a...

    For Smokers With Heart Trouble, Quitting Equals the Benefit of 3 Meds: Study

    Quitting smoking can give heart disease patients nearly five additional years of life without heart problems, according to a new study.

    "Kicking the habit appears to be as effective as taking three medications for preventing heart attacks and strokes in those with a prior heart attack or procedure to open blocked arteries," said study author Dr. Tinka van Trier, of Amsterdam University Me...

    Bong Use at Home Quickly Fills Air With Toxins

    Smoking pot through a bong doesn't protect the nonsmokers in the room from the dangers of secondhand smoke, a new study warns.

    Bongs have been touted as a safe way to protect nonsmokers from secondhand marijuana smoke. But it can expose them to extremely high concentrations of fine particulate matter - five to 1...

    U.S. Smoking, Vaping Rates Fell in First Year of Pandemic: CDC

    Consider it a silver lining, courtesy of the coronavirus: A new government report reveals that both cigarette smoking and electronic cigarette use droppe...

    Young Pot Smokers May Be at Higher Odds for Repeat Strokes

    Young adult pot smokers who've suffered a stroke are more likely to have another stroke if they keep toking, a new study finds.

    Research has already linked heavy cannabis use with an increased risk of

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
  • |
  • February 3, 2022
  • |
  • Full Page
  • You Don't Have to Smoke to Get Lung Cancer

    Tobacco use is far and away the leading cause of lung cancer, but non-smokers are also at risk, experts say.

    People who smoke have the highest risk, and smokeless tobacco is also a threat. About 90% of lung cancer cases could be prevented by eliminating tobacco use, according to the World Health Organization...

    Vaping Might Worsen COVID-19 Symptoms

    If you vape and catch COVID-19, you may feel a whole lot worse than people who come down with the virus but don't use electronic cigarettes, researchers say.

    When compared to folks with COVID-19 who didn't use e-cigarettes, those who did were more likely to report chest pain, c...

    Why Quitting Smoking Might Be a Bit Tougher for Women

    Quitting smoking is a daunting challenge for anyone, but a new international study suggests that women may struggle more than men to kick the habit.

    Women were less likely than men to be successful on their first day of trying to quit, a critical predictor of long-term success, researchers found, although the team also discovered that larger warning labels on cigarette packs might change ...

    You Don't Have to Be a Smoker to Get Lung Cancer

    Think you're safe from lung cancer because you've never smoked? Think again.

    While cigarette smoking is the main cause of lung cancer, it's possible to get the disease without ever lighting up.

    "Anyone with lungs can get lung cancer," said Dr. Missak Haigentz Jr., chief of Thoracic and Head and Neck Medical Oncology at Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey in New Brunswick.

    ...

    Four Factors in Midlife Predict a Healthy Old Age for Women

    Examining a woman's health in midlife can predict her health decades later, researchers say.

    Four specific factors -- higher body mass index (BMI), smoking, arthritis and depressive symptoms -- at age 55 are associated with clinically important declines in physical health 10 years later, a new study reports.

    "Age 55 to 65 may be a critical decade," said study co-author Dr. Daniel So...

    Quitting Smoking Ups Survival After Lung Cancer Diagnosis

    For smokers, new research suggests it really is never too late to quit.

    The study found that folks who kick their habit after a lung cancer diagnosis will likely live longer than those who continue lighting up.

    Investigators from Italy concluded that lung cancer patients who stop smoking at or around the time of their diagnosis can look forward to survival times nearly a third (29%...

    Resolved to Quit Smoking This Year? Experts Offer Tips

    If giving up tobacco is one of your New Year's resolutions, know that it won't be easy but don't give up. Fifty million ex-smokers in the United States are proof that it can be done.

    "More than 70% of smokers want to quit smoking and 40% will make an attempt this year, but only between 4% and 7% can quit without support," Jennifer Folkenroth, national senior director of tobacco programs w...

    New Zealand Aims for Zero Smokers in a Generation: Could Plan Work Elsewhere?

    Nearly all countries agree: Smoking is bad, and getting people to kick the habit is a worthy public health goal.

    But no country has ever attempted what New Zealand is about to try: an outright ban on all cigarette sales.

    The plan is to let those who already smoke retain the right to keep buying cigarettes if they wish, but as of 2023, anyone under 15 would be prohibited for life fro...

    Could Vaping Help Smokers Quit, Even When They Aren't Trying To?

    Some smokers who take up vaping may give up tobacco cigarettes altogether -- without ever intending to, a new study suggests.

    The researchers see this as a hopeful sign that daily use of e-cigarettes

    A Little Cash May Help Women Quit Smoking During Pregnancy: Study

    Quitting smoking is especially important during pregnancy, and now a new study suggests that when it comes to kicking the habit, cash may be just the incentive some women need.

    The study results suggest progressive financial rewards for smoking abstinence "could be implemented in the routine health care of pregnant smokers," the French researchers said. Dr. Ivan Berlin of Hôpital Pitié-...

    Vaping Can Trigger Gene Changes in Cells: Study

    For those who think vaping is safer than smoking, think again.

    A new study warns that vaping triggers the same gene regulation changes that smoking does, so it may raise the risk of cancer and other serious diseases.

    "Our study, for the first time, investigates the biological effects of vaping in adult e-cigarette users, while simultaneously accounting for their past smoking exposur...

    Vaping Could Weaken Your Bones, Study Finds

    The evidence against vaping is mounting, and a new study now links e-cigarettes with an increased risk for broken bones.

    Over time, vaping appears to increase the risk for fracture of the hip, spine and wrist by 46%, according to the findings. Researchers said these fractures happen from falls while standing and even from lower heights such as sitting.

    "My research has painted anot...

    About 4 in 10 Stroke Survivors Who Smoke Don't Quit the Habit

    About 4 in 10 stroke survivors who were smokers still puff away after their stroke, which puts them at increased risk for another stroke or heart disease, a new study shows.

    "If you told a stroke neurologist that 40% of their patients don't have their blood pressure controlled or weren't taking their aspirin or their cholesterol-lowering medication, I think they would be very disappointed...

    Too Often, Fatal Heart Attack or Stroke Is First Sign of Heart Trouble in Smokers

    A fatal heart attack or stroke is often the first indication of heart disease in middle-aged smokers, according to a new study.

    It also found that heart disease is the leading complication among smokers when compared with deaths from other causes -- including lung cancer. In addition, smoking is associated with developing heart disease at a younger age and shortening a person's life by as...

    In Canada, Ban on Menthol Cigarettes Had More Smokers Quitting

    If the U.S. Food and Drug Administration wants to know whether it should follow through on its proposed menthol cigarette ban, it need only look to Canada for an answer.

    A new study finds that Canada's ban on menthol cigarettes seemed to drive more smokers to quit, with overall cigarette sales dipping after the law took hold.

    Researchers found that after menthol ban went into effect...

    Why Are Young Black Americans Becoming Less Heart-Healthy?

    Young, Black Americans are experiencing significant spikes in obesity, type 2 diabetes and smoking, all risk factors for heart attack and stroke.

    Between 2007 and 2017 -- before the COVID-19 pandemic and the concerns it has created -- hospitalized Black Americans aged 18 to 44 had sharp increases in these risks. They were also having higher rates of health complications and poor hospital ...

    Vaping Worse Than Smoking for Boosting Odds for Stroke at Young Age

    Adults who vape could suffer a stroke at least a decade younger than those who smoke tobacco, a new study has found.

    E-cigarette users have a 15% higher risk of stroke at a younger age than traditional tobacco smokers, according to preliminary findings.

    "The median age to have a stroke was 48 years of age for e-cigarette users compared to 59 years of age for traditional tobacco smok...

    Quit Smoking Before 45 & Wipe Out 87% of Lung Cancer Risk

    Smokers who kick the habit before age 45 can nearly eliminate their excess risk of dying from lung or other cancers, a new study estimates.

    It's well-established that after smokers quit, their risk of tobacco-related cancers drops substantially over time.

    Researchers said the new findings underscore the power of quitting as early as possible. Among more than 400,000 Americans they f...

    Show All Health News Results